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Calendar: 1842

1842

Bailey, W(illiam) A.
( )

To Catherine Seton
( )

He is going to give her an extract from the letters of Roosevelts to grandmother just received thinking that Aunt might not like to show it to Catherine herself. (One extract follows). After arriving and making a general survey of the city he settled down in a retired part of the city to think over the problem which had been puzzling him. His recent contract with fast living had secularized his thoughts to such an extent that his first impulse was to try to ignore his doubts and forget them. But he could not. His doubts had become convictions and he felt it impossible and wrong for him to remain as he was. He made his decision in the presence of God who knows and with care to use all those means a Christian should to obtain God's guidance. He made up his mind to join the Catholic Church. He is going to make a spiritual retreat of abstinence and prayer for a week and if he finds no change in his sentiments will feel it his duty to join them. He is writing his Godmother because he feels bound to inform her of this decision. It is the hardest task he has ever had to perform both on account of his loneliness and his realization of the disapprobation and unkind thoughts that many will have whose learning and virtue he respects. He will not speak of the reasons which have influenced him and asks only that she, Grandfather, and those who love, judge him with charity and in the understanding that he is sincere. He has not found the common opinion among his visitors on the condition of religion in Catholic countries and especially in Rome at all substantiate. He has observed closely, and the whole air in Rome is deeply religious. Most visitors have contact only with the residents of their own nationality in Rome and never get to know any Italians other than innkeepers and "valets des places." They enter the churches only to see paintings or to attend great crowded ceremonies. Typical of them all were the Americans who came with him from Naples. Not one entered the churches except to see paintings or attend crowded ceremonies. They never visited any respectable Italian family or inquired about the institutions of charity and instruction. Yet they will feel able to deliver judgments on the character and religion of the people. The Italians and the romans in particular, are a standard people. He quotes a "learned writer" that Rome is the city most full of faith and piety. He has had opportunity to find out about the institutions of the city and is surprised at their numbers and excellence. The rich and the powerful attend upon the poor and afflicted. (End of the extract). William Bailey asks Catherine to keep it secret that she has seen this excerpt until Father receives a letter from Rosy, which should be soon, as he promised one after his week-long retreat and the vessel bringing this one had a long passage.
II-l-a A.L.S. 1p. Royal 10vo.
1


1842

Dugué, F(rancois Joseph Enoul Livaudais)
Jefferson Parish, Louisiana

Nine licenses signed by Dugué authorizing Father (Constantine) Maenhaut (in two instances), and Father (Louis) Moni to marry (the following persons):

March 10, William Radford and Catherine McQuade;
April 1, Joseph Wilker and Catherine Snitiff;
April 17, James McCormick and Catherine Dowty;
May 13, Joseph Schamber and Salomé Nesse;
May 31, William H. Titus and Maria Donally, (written in pencil) Donalin;
June 10, John Lawrence and Mary Lynch;
July 2, Peter FitzSimmons and Brigite McWire;
September 15, Antonio Gants and Margaret Oal;
November 26, Francois Perrillien and Eliza Bourc.

V-4-m Licenses S. 11pp. 4to.
22


1842

Maurian, Charles, Parish Judge
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

Licenses signed by Maurian, (a few signed by) J. Bermudez, parish judge pro. tem., granting license to Father (Louis) Moni, curate of St. Louis Church, (some to) Father (Edward) D'Hauw, (one to) Father J(ames) I(gnatius) Mullen, rector of St. Patrick's; (one to)Gallien Tréval, associate judge of the city court, (and some to) Bishop (Anthony) Blanc to marry (the following persons):
January 4, Frantz Georgens and Eliza Klinghammer;
January 7, Philip Lützenberg and Rosina Allerstörffer;
January 7, Lucien Florentan(?) and Adeline Theresa Price; January 7, Henry Shafy(?) and Sarah Johnson, widow of Charles Due;
January 7, John McNamara and Rose Curry;
January 10, George Washington Crown and Ellen McHugh;
January 10, Jeremiah Kennelly and Alice O'Neil, widow of Ja(me)s Donlin;
January 11, John O'Brian and Emelie Lussera(?), widow of Peter Dewen;
January 15, William Byrne and Catherine Ward;
January 21, Valentin Engelhart and Margareta Schmidt;
January 22, Thomas McKenna and Catherine Lehey, widow of Patrick Sullivan;
January 24, Michael Münch and Catherine Müller;
January 25, Valentin Martin and Anna Maria Joseph;
January 25, Pierre Poursine and Clara Remoussin;
January 27, Silvester Quinn and Bridget Murray;
January 27, William Rogers and Catherine McCrink; widow of Patrick Meehan;
January 29, Thomas Monk and Elizabeth O'Connor;
February 4, Alexander Beton and Ellen Murphy, widow of Thomas Lawler;
February 5, August Wetzel and Barbara Schuber;
February 5, James McCabe and Sarah Kelly;
February 12, Maurice Shea and Mary Casey;
February 15, Philip Arnetta and Johanna Crowley, widow of Cornelius Sullivan;
February 15, Thomas O'Harring and Catherine Larkin, widow of Michael Donavan;
March 2, John McMahon and Bridget Hart, widow of Th(oma)s Mulligan;
March 5, Patrick Dalahant and Catherine Coke, widow of James Flynn;
March 8, Peter Eiswirth and Catherine Stenger;
March 15, Michael O'Brian and Ellen Dwyer, widow of M. Harrington;
March 19, Edward Fitzgerald and Mary Waldron;
March 26, Francis O'Neil and Ann Mulhall;
March 28, Mathew Daly and Mary McGrath, widow of Sydney Abel;
March 28, James McGill and Hannah Griffin;
March 29, Henry Charter and Margaret Gammond;
March 30, Richard McCabe and Alice Lamb;
April 2, Philippe Milaudon and Marie Agathe Abat;
April 5, John B. Dogherty and Bridget Doyle, widow of John Maguire;
April 5, Antoine Dupeyré and Eugénie Angaud;
April 7, James Murray and Maria Brothers;
April 18, Mathias Lee and Catherine Schenker;
April 20, Thomas Twomey and Mary Fullerton;
April 23, John Sullivan and Julia Myhan;
April 23, Thomas Burke and Mary McManus, widow of J. O'Brian;
April 25, Michail Coffee and Johanna Lester, widow of Joseph Murphy;
April 26, John Sweeney and Ann McManus, widow of Patrick McKiernan;
April 27, William Barry and Catherine Connelly, widow of W(illia)m May;
April 29, Charles Cox and Catherine McGoey;
April 29, Christian Cass and Elizabeth Donnelly;
April 30, Owen Kieran and Ann Callaghan;
May 2, Johannes Pfeffer and Margareta Scherer;
May 3, Hypolite Peralta and Laura Coulon Jumonville;
May 5, William Schmidt and Maria Muller;
May 9, Armand Montreuil and Genevieve Constance Delery; (on the back of this license is written) Barthelemy Montreuil, Jeanne Modeste Dutillet, Charles Delery, Aimée Dutillet;
May 12, John Henesy and Ann Murphy, widow of John Rose; May 13, Dennis Sullivan and Honoria Halloran;
May 14, John Boswood and Ann Quick, widow of James Lynch; May 18, James Griffin and Catherine McGraw;
May 27, James Taylor and Ann Clarke;
May 30, Hieronimus Hack and Ann Sander, widow of Michael Bresson;
May 30, William McLaughlin and Ann Dougherty;
June 1, Francis Duffy and Mary Monaghan, widow of Matthew Driscoll;
June 2, Martin Hogan and Bridget McGran;
June 6, Tho(ma)s Peniston and Amelie Allard Duplantier; June 7, Jean Nicolas Claudel and Euphrosie Conrad;
June 7, John McFee and Catherine Smith, widow of James Bateson;
June 8, Peter Higgins and Mary Ann Hamilton, widow of John Cornelius;
June 8, Robert Carlin and Margaret (McGirk), widow of Jeremiah McGirk;
June 9, Edward King and Ellen Dillon;
June 10, Archibald Page and Ann Gray;
June 11, John Smith Dawson Ogle and Celicia Brown;
June 17, James Railey and Mary Barry;
June 18, Jules Augustin Rousseau and Elmire Poupart;
June 23, Frederick Letzelter and Emma Grenner;
June 24, John Byrne and Maria Donlin;
July 2, Pierre Becker and Margaret Braun;
July 5, Francis Wood and Mary Maguire;
July 6, John Watkins and Sarah Ann Vizard, widow of F. Burke; July 11, John Bennett and Lucretia Blake;
July 12, Edward White and Margaret Codey, widow of David Mulchy;
July 16, Theodore Verret and Marie Azélie Foucher;
July 18, Thomas Landy and Mary Englisby;
July 23, James Masterson and Rosana Donlin;
July 27, Francois Ruiz Alpuente and Mathilde Antoinette Hepburn; July 27, Thomas Calgan and Margaret Owen;
August 1, John Poynton and Elizabeth Simon;
August 1, W(illia)m Creane and Betty Gallagher, widow of John Finlin;
August 4, Stephen Allen and Brigit Hanassy, widow of Jackson; August 8, Mathew McAuliff and Mary Mahan;
August 8, Joseph Lesueur and Anne Claire O'Reilly;
August 11, John Cole and Sarah Murphy, widow of Hugh McCarthy;
August 11, Patrick Fallon and Helen Rilkinton, widow of Hugh McNally
August 12, Joseph Whitmore and Mary Jones, widow of John Kerner;
August 17, Magin Bernadas and Celestine Leonise Beltran; August 23, James Daly and Mary McQuade, widow of James Dougherty;
August 27, Victor Visinier and Marie Eulalie Angèle Peyroux; September 3, Thomas Williams and Mary Scaney, widow of William Gibney;
September 7, Patrick Coy and Rosana Hardy, widow of Sam(ue)l Bertheisa;
September 8, John McClane and Sarah Finch;
September 8, Henry Jones and Catharine Donavan;
September 9, William Petterson and Eliza Buggy;
September 15, Samuel B. Ellison and Susan Crimmins; September 15, Arthur Kelly and Sarah Healy, widow of Michael Carsen; September 21, Charles Louer and Mary Hag;
October 1, Robert Hart and Austine Austin;
October 21, Edourd Lavergne and Marie Auguste;
October 24, Lucien Dubois and Marie Louise Pedesclaux; November 5, John O'Neil and Elizabeth Haskins;
November 11, William Watson and Lucy Weyl, widow of Algernon Sidney Green;
November 17, Thomas Maly and Isabella Daly, widow of Patrick Daly;
November 18, Henry Enoul Dugué Livaudais and Marie Celestine Drew;
November 19, Marc Dodart and Laure Margaret Sel;
November 20, Lawrence Rush and Mary Fulham, widow of L. Skelley;
November 22, William McAtee and Anora Duffy;
November 23, Patrick Cummiskey and Ann Dunn;
November 23, Benoit Antoine and Adele Jamet;
November 24, Robert Nicholson and Catharine Brady;
November 24, James Finnan and Catharine Dinnigan;
November 25, John B(aptis)te Monié and Josephine Montaine; November 28, Francois Assant and Sophia Beck;
November 29, Jean George Assant and Eliza Burns;
November 30, Alexander Jameson and Suzan Bradley;
December 3, Joseph Victor and Marie Joseph;
December 7, Edouard Francois Correjalles and Feliciane Tilano, widow of Tho(ma)s Aug(usti)n Obiol;
December 8, Francois Bacone and Pauline Eugénie Dieu;
December 8, Joseph Beaulieu and Candida Casanovas, widow of William Holmes Cobb;
December 10, Jacques Henry and Josephine Py;
December 12, Michael Donohu(e) and Julia O'Bryan;
December 13, John William Parr and Mary Ann McIlvaine; December 14, Peter Corr and Emilia Burns, widow of Patrick Duffy;
December 15, Dominique Guerin and Cecile Maillot;
December 15, Lewis Lambert Bown and Marie Lilia Daquin; December 16, W(illia)m A. Nott and Pauline Emma Canonge; December 16, Nicolas Vigey and Marie Thereze Marechal; December 24, John Clayton and Mary Higgins;
December 26, Joseph Purcell and Eliza Neale, widow of W(illia)m Connor;
December 27, Thomas Starck and Margaret Power, widow of Dennis Callaghan;
December 27, Owen Kelly and Mary Murphy;
December 28, Charles Sagory and Suzanna Tricou;
December 30, Henry Fleckner and Catherine Paulen;
December 30, Francois Rimailho and Jeanne Desirée Cazaux (on the back of this license): Charles, son of Charles Chaudurier(?) and Elène Dubois, born September 29, godparents Charles and Marie Genois;
December 31, William E. Kennedy and Charlotte H. Peirce; December 31, James Gallagher and Jane Hammond.

V-4-m 150 licenses
341


1842

New York Ladies Seaman's Friends Society
(New York, New York)

Constitution and notes of the Society.

I-l-f Notebook 4to.
0


1842(?) ( )

Rhett, R. B(arnwell)
( )

To (Orestes A.) Brownson
( )

Brownson's letter to Lewis which was shown to Rhett induces the latter to write the present letter. Rhett encloses the proceedings of the Whig party which nominated Henry Clay and Jefferson Davis. Brownson should read carefully the resolution relating to (Martin) Van Buren. If Van Buren does become the candidate, the party will have to take the defensive position. South Carolina can go anyway. The Whig's hope for success rests in the nomination of Martin Van Buren. A criticism of Van Buren is given by Rhett. People will vote against the man while they sympathize with the party. The party will have to defend the appropriations and expenditures during his administration. On the other issue of 1840, the party must take the part of apology or justification. Rhett doubts their chance of success. If they do succeed, there is little chance of bringing the government back to its ancient simplicity and economy. Van Buren as the Whigs' candidate hinders the party's fighting as aggressors. The Democrat party needs reformation but Van Buren has not the genius of a reformer. There is only one man in the party who possesses such qualities. Brownson knows who it is. Rhett would like to see Brownson write a series of essays for the Boston Pilot on the subject.

I-3-f A.L.S. (Signature removed) 4pp. 8vo.
2


(1842) ( )
Tyler, R.A.
( )

To Orestes A. Brownson
(Chelsea, Massachusetts)

Miss Tyler recalls the lines of poetry which were upon Byron's portrait. The speech was not made at Brownson. Miss Tyler supposes Brownson laughed at the touse she made about losing a word in her last letter. Miss Tyler admits that she loses words in her conversation but seldom while writing. Her sentences always come to her and make her feel like copying. Miss Tyler thinks she ought to apologize for her repeated intrusion but she would not know how to begin.

I-3-f A.L.S. (Incomplete) 2pp. 8vo.
1


1842 Jan 1

(Louisiana) New Orleans Post Office
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

Receipt for $6 from Bishop (Anthony) Blanc for box rent to January 1, 1843. Signed by M.(?) Musson(?).

V-4-m Receipt S. 1p. 32mo.
2


1842 Jan 2

(Chanche), Bishop John Joseph
Natchez, (Mississippi)

to Bishop (Anthony) Blanc
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

Father (Joseph N.) Brogard leaves today for the new situation to which Blanc destines him. (Chanche) is obliged to him for having so cheerfully consented to remain that long. (Chanche) hopes he will find a mission more suitable for his health. (Chanche) has nobody yet to take his place. This morning he received a letter from the Bishop of Vincennes giving Father (Claude) Francois his exeat and allowing (Chanche) to make use of his services. He is not qualified to attend this congregation but (Chanche) has a notion of trying to do something for the black people. Perhaps Francois might succeed in that mission. (Chanche) has some hopes of soon laying the cornerstone of the church. He sends some letters given to him in Baltimore and asks Blanc to forward them to Mobile. He is waiting for Blanc's invitation to the consecration. What has become of Father Odin?

V-4-m A.L.S. 3pp. 4to.
4


1842 Jan 2

Labadie, N(icholas) D.
Galveston, Texas

to Bishop (Anthony) Blanc
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

Blanc's letter of December 14 is at hand. They know as little as Blanc as to the exact time Father (John Mary) Odin, (C.M.) will return among them. On September 15 Labadie received a letter from Odin stating that he had been sick on the Labacca but would leave September 6 for St. Antonio. Labadie has just returned from his plantation where he spent all December. It is presumed that Odin is at Austin. As soon as Odin lands among them, the first house he goes to will be Labadie's. Labadie will give him the packages and no doubt Blanc's requests will be immediately attended to. Odin is wanted and truly he cannot be spared. Their little church is completed, that is, enclosed. Odin will have to have an altar made. The articles sent by Father (Louis) Moni are in the building.

V-4-m A.L.S. 3pp. 4to.
4


1842 Jan 3

(Belinaye), Marquis de (la)
London, (England)

To Bishop (Anthony) Blanc
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

(Belinaye) expresses his gratitude and acknowledges receipt of Blanc's letter of November 15. His friend, Baron Capelle sent Blanc on (December) 3, the letter of the Prefect of Bordeaux confirming his preceding one of September 17 to the French Chargé d'Affaires. (Belinaye) sends a copy of that previous letter. It will make Blanc no longer doubt the return of the unfortunate child to New Orleans and the continued infamy of that scoundrel. The two letters of the Prefect of Gironde are conclusive. (Belinaye) thought he should warn Blanc about this man; he did so by writing to (Peter) Conrey. When she disappeared they cold not ask the sources which could put them in contact with her without telling how it was. If (Belinaye) told everything he knows about him and from whom he learned it, Blanc would be disgusted. And could he justify himself in having hidden from her whose uncle he is, all that blights the life of this scoundrel? What Blanc said on this subject troubles (Belinaye) greatly. Although he cannot see again nor communicate with the ladies who let this man enter the home of an old friend, (Belinaye) does not think they contributed at all to the return of his victim. (Belinaye) again asks Blanc's intercession as well as that of Conrey, to extricate this unfortunate child from her shame.

A.L.S. (French)

Copied on the same paper:

--------
1841 Sep 17

Sers, Prefect of Gironde
Bordeaux, (France)

To Baron de Bourqueney
London, (England)

As soon as he received Bourqueney's letter of the 9th and its enclosure concerning Madame de Beaumont he hastened to get the necessary information from Messrs. Claussmann of Bordeaux. Here are the results: "Madame de Beaumont remained only a few days in Paris after her arrival in April. She returned to Bordeaux and on May 13 left again for New Orleans by the Talma, Captain Cayol. While at Bordeaux she lived quietly in a boarding house run by respectable ladies named Dufour who when questioned were disposed to give information about her for it seemed they had received news. The boat arrived July 3; Madame de Beaumont, pregnant 7 or 8 months, went on board. Dr. Chabaud, well known in New Orleans was on board. He took care of her and could give information." Messrs. Claussmann know nothing of the mysterious circumstances; Madame de Beaumont was alone and said only that her husband lived, not in New Orleans, but in the interior. She attributed her abrupt return to America to the poor reception given her by her aunt in Paris.

Copy

V-4-m A.L.S. (French) pp.. 4to.
10


1842 Jan 3

Griffin, J.H.
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

To Father (Stephen) Rousselon
(New Orleans, Louisiana)

Receipt for $2.20 for freight and primage on the "Caledonia."
V-4-m A. Receipt S. 2pp. 32mo.
1


1842 Jan 4

Moni, Father L(ouis)
(New Orleans, Louisiana)

A receipt for $17.03 received from Bishop (Anthony) Blanc for postage for himself, Rousselon, Vezian, M(a)enhaut, Leon, Martin and Gauve.

V-4-m A. Receipt S. (French) 2pp. 12mo.
1


1842 Jan 6

Doherty. John J.
Frederick, Maryland

to Bishop John Baptist Purcell
of Cincinnati, Ohio

He received Purcell's letter and had intended to answer sooner but he mislaid his intended letter. Instead of waiting until spring as Purcell suggested he is making the trip west now because the theological course being arranged for the most advanced members at Rose Hill College he found that the matter they were taking now was what he had already. He has stood the trip thus far in good health and will tarry at Frederick for a retreat under the direction of Father Mullady. He will go to Purcell when he finishes his retreat. Mr. McClosky gave him the money he asked.

II-4-h A.L.S. 2pp. 8vo.
4


1842 Jan 6

O'Connor, Father M(ichael)
Pittsburg, (Pennsylvania)

To Bishop John Baptist Purcell
of Cincinnati, Ohio

O'Connor apologizes for not answering Purcell's letter. Purcell has probably learned that he nearly visited him in the company of the Bishop (Peter Richard Kenrick) but must defer the visit. Purcell has asked his opinion on certain questions connected with the Temperance Movement. He does not regard the violation of the pledge as a sin, and the present fidelity of the Irish to the pledge is a trait of Irish character. Great good is to be expected from the spread of the temperance cause but that does not make the promise bind under pain of sin, except in case of scandal or false conscience. He does not express these opinions publicly although he says nothing to the contrary. The erroneous opinion of those who think the pledge binds under sin does not make it an oath. Those who seem so anxious to announce the fact that the pledge binds in this way will find drunkenness stalking the land. There are some objections to the temperance movement: contact with Protestants, dangers resulting from relapse or of losing sight of the proper principles. But for those who preach against the society when it has been established by the bishops, he thinks there is no punishment too severe. Union on this point is very important. To aid the cause he suggests that the Holy See be petitioned to grant an indulgence for members of the society. A bishop must apply for it and O'Connor suggests that Purcell do it. With the petition there must be a statement of principles in accordance with established maxims. O'Connor has asked Kenrick to order 200 copies of the German catechism, but has heard nothing of them. He finds complaint in Pittsburg and Philadelphia that Digby is too learned. He suggests that the English of the quotations be inserted in the footnotes.
P.S. Father (Anthony) Deydier is yet with them laid up with bilious fever.

II-4-h A.L.S. 4pp. 8vo.
4


1842 Jan 7

Rosseau, Octave S.
St. Bernard Parish, Louisiana

Father Jean Caretta or any other priest of the dioceses of the State of Louisiana is hereby authorized to marry Reville Villeri and Elizabeth Adèle Ducros.

V-4-m A.D.S. (French) 1p. Folio
3


1842 Jan 9

(Loras), Bishop Mathias
Dubuque, (Iowa)

To Bishop (Anthony) Blanc
New Orleans, Louisiana

After the little rush of the holidays which they celebrated with a midnight Mass and 100 Communions, (Loras) will relax a minute with one of his most sincere friends. The 18 ordos have arrived and the 13 intentions taken care of. Next June he will talk of St. Cessien. (Loras) cannot express his satisfaction for Blanc's fine undertaking at St. Claude (Street). (Loras) has wanted for a long time to see a new church of St. Augustine started in New Orleans. Blanc's worthy trustees will no doubt open their eyes. Blanc pleases (Loras) in telling him that he was not done an ill turn at Lyons; he does not think that he merited it. All their attention is turned toward the Indians. It is a difficult undertaking. Their young missionaries astonish him with their zeal. They have hopes of getting help from the government. They have no good English catechism. (Loras) proposes to translate the Lyons catechism with the help of an American teacher who runs their school. He could have 1000 copies printed in Philadelphia for $100. The five parts with morning and evening prayers and those of Mass and Vespers would make a very useful book. Would Blanc take 250 copies at $25? If Bishop Portier is at Blanc's will he propose that Portier do the same? (Loras) sends his regards to Fathers Herisse and Moni.
P.S. At the first good opportunity (Loras)'s watch could be sent to Father (James) Fontbonne at St. Louis so it would reach (Loras).
V-4-m A.L.S. (French) 4pp. 4to.
3


1842 Jan 12

McCaffrey, Father James
McConnellsville, Ohio

to Bishop John Baptist Purcell
of Cincinnati, Ohio

Received Purcell's of Dec. 10, and was grieved to hear of the unfortunate occurrence in Brown County resulting in the
derangement of Mr. Mullony. Judge Hayward and thirteen others have taken the pledge of total abstinence. The Judge has also succeeded in getting a lot for the church. The lot will cost about $400, and has a frame building on it that can be fitted into a church for $200 more. Asks the bishop's advice. They can collect money to fit up the building but not for buying the lot. Has started a "Marietta Catholic Temperance Society." Asks the bishop for some pledges and medals. Father Vogler of Pittsburgh was there a few days ago selling his German publication. Understands that Father Henni wants to see him. Miss Mary Odell a Telegraph subscriber offers to care for the church should it be built in McConnellsville.
P.S. McCaffrey has told Judge Hayward of Purcell's invitation to Cincinnati, and he says he will accept if the state legislature does not call him to investigate some banks.

II-4-h A.L.S. 3pp. 8vo.
5


1842 Jan 14

(Hailandière), Bishop Cel(estin de la)
Vincennes, (Indiana)

to Bishop A(nthony) Blanc
New Orleans, L(ouisian)a

(Hailandière) is distressed by what Father (Stanislaus) Buteux wrote. Buteux is overwhelmed with debts on his churches; one burned and it is almost two years since he placed the first stone to rebuild it. He has not been able to raise the walls over a foot. Since (Hailandière) has been bishop of Vincennes, Buteux is the only priest he has given permission to take up a collection in New Orleans. He forbid Father (Francis M.) Masquelet to make any collections and if he changed in his case it was only because Blanc wished him to remain. Fathers (Anthony) Deydier and (Louis) Neyron did not try to collect in New Orleans for the expenses of their trip or even stop there. And all this time, many priests from other dioceses who had less need than those of Indiana were allowed to collect. And Blanc sends back the only priest (Hailandière) has sent! This favor will probably be the last one (Hailandière) will ask as bishop. He fears he is going to go bankrupt. Blanc can do as he pleases about Buteux. He asks Blanc to put Buteux in touch with the Sisters and tell him of his experiences with them. Buteux has an idea of the religious life which is not a true one. As for Bishop (Michael) Portier's note, Blanc has forgotten that (Hailandière) sent it in payment for provisions. Blanc's letter of December 30, 1840 will bear witness to that. Bishop (Benedict Joseph) Flaget, at Louisville, has been dangerously ill; he is better. They have just learned of Father (Maurice) Berel's death.

V-4-m A.L.S. (French) 2pp. 4to.
9


1842 Jan 15

Gardner, Melzan
Richmond, V(irgini)a

to O(restes) A. Brownson
Boston, Mass(achusetts)

Contrary to his expectations when he left Boston, his present position is not as he wished. The prospect of the establishment of a newspaper at Washington is dubious. He says that the probabilities are that Van Buren will be re-nominated as the candidate of the Democratic party. Fisk is negotiating for the purchase of a paper at Petersburg, (Virginia) and in probably three weeks will have a daily and a tri- weekly there and a weekly at Richmond - on all of which Gardner's assistance will be expected. He supposes himself unknown to (John C.) Calhoun's friends in Washington and so cannot look there for intelligence as to the prospect of a movement there on his behalf. (James) Buchanan is making good headway in Pennsylvania. Mr. Fisk desires him to say that the cares and perplexities incident to a change of location have prevented his writing to Brownson.
(Note: There is a copy of this in another hand)

I-3-f A.L.S. 3pp. 8vo.
4


1842 Jan 17

Loras, Bishop Mathias
Dubuque, (Iowa)

To Bishop (Anthony) Blanc
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

A printed copy of Loras' pastoral address. Father J(ames) Causse is the secretary. (Loras adds at the bottom of the address): "Your friend wishes to receive yours."

V-4-m Printed L. 2pp. Folio
2


1842 Jan 18

Brownson, O(restes) A.
( )

To W(illia)m D. Kelly
( )

Kelly may make his arrangements for the three other lectures on such evenings as will suit his convenience, only allowing Brownson to be in New York on next Tuesday evening. His lecture last night had a slim attendance, but produced a favorable impression.
(Gift of Daniel R. Barnes, June 18, 1968).

I-3-c Transcript (original in University of Virginia Library) 1p. 4to. 1


1842 Jan 18

Horstmann, Father J. William
Glandorf, Ohio

to Bishop John Baptist Purcell
of Cincinnati, Ohio

His health offers him hope yet of serving in the vineyard of the Lord, but this hope has been increased by the arrival of Father George Boehne a beloved disciple of his from Europe. Horstmann now is pleased that this young man will enable his people to have a pastor even in his sickness or death and at the same time will enable him to take care of the faithful in Wapakoneta. He sends the testimonials of Boehne asking that Purcell give him faculties for the present until rested from his journey from Europe he will be able to visit Purcell in person. So far this is three defenders of the faith with Bishop Lupke.
II-4-h A.L.S. 1p. 8vo. (Latin)
5


184(2) Jan 19

(Chanche), Bishop John Joseph
Natchez, (Mississippi)

To Bishop (Anthony) Blanc
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

(Chanche) sends a little bundle which he received from Baltimore. Blanc's not answering his letter which he wrote by Father (Joseph N.) Brogard induced (Chanche) to hope Blanc would be in Natchez. May he still hope? (Chanche) expects to lay the corner stone of their church some time next week. (Chanche) has not received the articles brought by Mr. Brunet; he might send them in care of Mr. Julienne.
V-4-m A.L.S. 3pp. 4to.
4


1842 Jan 20

Cenas, Hilary Breton
New Orleans, Louisiana

Bishop Antoine Blanc, Thomas Hale, and Martin H. Devereux as trustees of St. Patrick's Church appeared before Cenas, a notary, and declared that for $800 Charles O'Hara had bought Pew No. 25 subject to the conditions (set forth in this document). This was done in the presence of Ernest Granet and August Commandeur. The original was signed by (all above). Cenas certifies on August 25, 1842, the foregoing to be a true copy of the original. (On the back of the document in pencil): Sold to Blanc January 1. 1845(?) For $430.
V-4-m A.S. 2pp. Folio
7


1842 Jan 20

Dumartrait, A(drien)
St. Martinville, (Louisiana)

to Bishop A(nthony) Blanc
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

On the absence of the president of the trustees, Dumartrait acknowledges Blanc's letter of the 10th which Father (Giles F.) Martin gave him on the 15th, informing them that Martin had been named pastor. They have arranged the salary as it was established by his predecessor, Father (Charles Henry Boutelou de) St. Aubin. Father (Peter Francis) Beauprez fulfilled his duties as pastor pro tem to their satisfaction. Blanc will have heard of the death of Father (Maurice) Berel. They gave him the last respects owed to so virtuous a priest. Soon the place where he is buried will be enclosed and a monument erected. The new church is getting on but will not be finished until next summer, the fabrique has already borrowed 5000 piastres and 3000 more will be needed to finish it.

V-4-m A.L.S. (French) 3pp. 4to.
6


1842 Jan 21

Tschenhenss, C.SS.R., Father Francis X.
Norwalk, Ohio

to Bishop John Baptist Purcell
of Cincinnati, Ohio

Excuses his delay in writing because of his mission work. Had hoped that Father John Newman would meet him and give him an account of the affairs in the congregation but understands that he affrightened Purcell with idle fears. Assures Purcell that the Redemptorists earnestly desire to serve in the diocese and that his superior having called Father Newman back to Baltimore has promised to send another priest and a brother to aid him next year, and is willing to accept the care of the new church in Cincinnati. Tschenhenss, himself will not leave Norwalk until another German priest comes because a schism would undoubtedly result. Suggests that they will need more centers if they are to remain in the diocese, suggesting that Tiffin be given them. Speaks of the affairs of the parish and the raising of funds. Father (Joseph) Fregang's parties continue to join, but they will never recover from the effect of his doings. Speaks of the neighboring congregations, St. Boniface and Sacred Heart. At Mansfield he received a lady into the church. Hopes to erect a chapel there, also in Bloomtown. He had endeavored to settle the dispute in Bloom Township, Seneca County, but some have appealed to Father (Joseph) McNamee. Mr. Peterson has written to him that Fregang is trying to be incorporated by the State legislature as a Catholic clergyman. Suggests that Purcell make a declaration to the state that he is no longer a Roman Catholic clergyman. Also since some people imagine that if Fregang will build a church Purcell will accept him. Tschenhenss suggests that Purcell make a declaration of the position of Fregang and a retraction of his falsehoods.

II-4-h A.L.S. 3pp. 8vo.
8


1842 Jan 23

Labadie, N(icholas) D.
Galveston, (Texas)

To Bishop (Anthony) Blanc
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

Labadie met a friend just from Austin who informed him that Father (John Mary) Odin, (C.M.) was still in St. Antonio, as he understood, very low and much doubt was entertained as regards his recovery. Labadie has made every inquiry in his power and this is the most correct news he has received. He will write to Odin; he hopes he has recovered for hie is too useful to be snatched away from them.
V-4-m A.L.S. 2pp. 4to.
2


1842 Jan 23

(McFarland, John A.)
Tiffin, O(hio)

To (Francis P. McFarland, Mt. St. Mary's
Emmittsburgh, Maryland)

He is pleased to know that Francis's health is good. He fancies that he has recovered his health but is not able to withstand as well the changes of weather. There are several cases of measles and several have died from them. He is glad to hear from his old friend Mr. Clark. Since Francis asked him for some verse he obliges with two stanzas of six lines each about enduring adversity. (The letter is incomplete).
I-1-a A.L. (Incomplete) 2pp. 4to.
1


1842 Jan 24

Acton, Cardinal C.
Rome, Italy

to Bishop John Baptist Purcell
of Cincinnati, Ohio

The progress of the church in America is a source of joy to him and he hopes that in the new position to which he has just been placed he may be able to be of service to the United States. Asks that Purcell pray for him that he may bear his burden.

II-4-h A.L.S. 1p. 8vo.
1


1842 Jan 24

McLaughlin, Father Peter
Cleveland, Ohio

to Bishop John Baptist Purcell
of Cincinnati, Ohio

Is surprised and sorry that his letter caused Purcell trouble as he has learned from Purcell's letter. Will pay Mrs. Golden and will do anything else Purcell demands to make amends. Explains the lack of collections from the mission, the expenses that he has had to undergo and the utter lack of funds which he now lays before the bishop when he would have done so in the last letter but for fear of censure. Speaks of his faults and his need of direction, especially from Purcell. P.S. Has other things to write about but will first await Purcell's answer.

II-4-h A.L.S. 3pp. 8vo.
3


1842 Jan 24

Mina, Father Ve. M(odest)e and Father (Joseph) Billon, St. John Baptist
(Second German Coast, Louisiana)

To Father St(ephen) Rousselon
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

Joseph Bourgeois, wishing to marry Marie Céline
Champagne, asks for a dispensation. Both live in St. Charles Parish, First German Coast. Mina received Rousselon's letter of the 22nd and hastens to send the baptismal certificate requested (no enclosure). Billon joins in sending respects.

V-4-m A.L.S. (French) 2pp. 4to.
4


1842 Jan 26

Levin, Lewis C.; Crist, George; Parham, Joseph C.

To O(restes) A. Brownson
Boston, Massachusetts

This committee was chosen at a meeting of the Jefferson Society of Reformed Drinkers of the Northern Liberties to invite Brownson to give a lecture to the society on the subject of temperance. A collection will then be taken up to replenish their exhausted treasury.

I-3-f A.L.S. 1p. 8vo.
2


1842 Jan 26

Machebeuf, Father Joseph P.
Sandusky City, Ohio

to Bishop John Baptist Purcell
of Cincinnati, Ohio

On his return from the mission at Soupoint? River he was pleased to find Purcell's letter containing the promise. He sends this answer by Mr. John Beaty who is going to Cincinnati. The contract for the roof, etc., has not been let because the committee at the expectation of Mr. Farrell refused to sign. Thinks that Purcell's donation will aid. Suggests that Purcell deposit the money in Cincinnati and send an order to draw on the bank of Sandusky. Thinks that if Purcell saw the church he would double his promised help. Described the inscription to be put on the stone at the entrance but leaves the conscription to Purcell. Father Louis De Goësbriand, he did not say joined the total abstinence but was opposed to it.
P.S. Father (Peter) McLaughlin was there last week and will return to give a course of lectures if Purcell approves. Machebeuf asks Purcell to make the decision.

II-4-h A.L.S. 3pp. 8vo.
5


1842 Jan 28

Eberlée, Therése
Nazareth, (Kentucky)

To Bishop Anthony Blanc
New Orleans, L(ouisian)a

She was in the Dominican House only 14 days; she found it was not her vocation to remain. She walked to Nazareth because she had no money. The superioress received her well; Eberlée told her the truth quite frankly, that she came from St. Magdalen's, Springfield, Kentucky, what happened to the letter, etc. Eberlée has no vocation for a spiritual community nor to marry. She believes God asks her to live in the world, to teach, and to give good example. She asks Blanc to lend her $4 so that she can return to the city to look for a job. She will work until she has enough to reach a seaport and return to Europe.
V-4-m A.L.S. (German) 4pp. 4to.
2


1842 Jan 28

Lefevre, Peter Paul, Coad. Bishop Detroit
Detroit, Michigan

to Bishop John Baptist Purcell
of Cincinnati, Ohio

In thanking Purcell for his congratulations on his being made bishop he states that he would not accept the burdens of his office without obedience and hopes that God will give him the grace to carry on. The diocese of Detroit he finds in a deplorable condition. The land especially, of which Bishop (Frederick) Résé had boasted, he finds in terrible condition. All are held only in trust. The taxes, are several years in arrears, some have been forfeited for taxes, much is owed on them. Lefevre does not know what to do, and asks Purcell for advice. The first bit of suffering he met with was the news that two priests, Fathers Morrissey and Boheme were suspended and that the latter had added to his fault. On Christmas he preached to the French Congregation at St. Anne's and with his seminarians and over 200 of the congregation took the total abstinence pledge. At the Irish parish, Trinity, under Father Martin Kundig there are 600 members. On Saturday, the 22nd, all the college buildings of St. Philip Neri were burned. Has heard that Father (Bernard) O'Cavanaugh is returning to the diocese. But he hopes not at least until he has done penance. Extends to Purcell whatever powers he possesses should Purcell find himself with the limits of the Detroit diocese.
P.S. Sends regards to Father Edward Purcell but says that he cannot receive at present any postulant for the seminary.

II-4-h A.L.S. 2pp. 8vo.
8


1842 Jan 29

Bonnecaze, L.
Baton Rouge, (Louisiana)

to Bishop Anthony Blanc
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

P. Hicky, president of the trustees, has requested Bonnecaze to reply to Blanc's letter of the 8th. He is happy to announce that they have placed Father (Joseph N.) Brogard in charge of the church at Baton Rouge. They thank Blanc for giving them so distinguished a pastor; they will shoe him all the consideration he merits. (P,S.) Bonnecaze will soon come down with Léontine; they will pay Blanc a visit.

V-4-m A.L.S. (French) 3pp. 4to.
4


1842 Jan 29

O'Connor, Father M(ichael)
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania

to Bishop John Baptist Purcell
of Cincinnati, Ohio

Writes to thank Purcell for his invitation to speak for the orphans, and to decline. Circumstances prevent his acceptance and if they did not he does not feel that he has anything worth traveling 400 miles to say. Apologizes for his delay. Has received word from Father T. McCarthy of Mallow and all are well.
P.S. Asks Purcell about applying for an indulgence in connection with their temperance work.

II-4-h A.L.S. 1p. 8vo.
3


1842 Jan 31

(Chanche), Bishop John Joseph
Natchez, (Mississippi)

to Bishop (Anthony) Blanc
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

(Chanche) sees that Blanc is determined not to come to Natchez. In his last favour, Blanc mentioned sending a priest for the laying of the cornerstone but Blanc resists all these inspirations. About that so much talked of crosier, is Blanc going to let )Chanche) officiate without a crosier? If he were Blanc's confessor he would give him as a penance to bring it to Natchez himself. Good old Father (Jean Claude) Francois and (Chanche) will have to do the best they can. They will have to delay the ceremony until sometime next week. Will Blanc drop him a word on the regulations for Lent hitherto practiced in this diocese. No one has come to his assistance, it is well Francois is there. He has opened through Francois a mission among the Blacks. These poor people (Negroes) have been thus far absolutely abandoned. (Chanche) had asked Blanc in one of his letters to tell him the name of the curé de Notre Dame des Victoires at Paris. Blanc is to give (Chanche's) respects to Bishop Portier if he is with him.

V-4-m A.L.S. 4pp. 4to.
4


(1842) (Feb)

(Peabody, Elizabeth P.?)
( )

To (Orestes A. Brownson
Boston, Massachusetts)

In looking through her papers (Peabody) has found an attempt she made to find the original facts out of which grew the doctrine of the Church concerning the Trinity. She has copied it to prove to Brownson that while she was associated with the Unitarians, she still acknowledged (Brownson's) doctrine of the theory. There are, however, some points that puzzle her and if (Brownson) can explain them to her she will be glad. (Note added) February, 1842: The above paper was written some time since last October. She does not know whether it was given to the one to whom it was addressed. No answer was given. She sees now where the error was which brought her to a stop. It is false that they are taught by God manifested in man in some degree.
I-3-f A.L. 4pp. 4to.
2


1842 Feb 2

DeGoesbriand, Father Louis
Louisville, Ohio

to Bishop John Baptist Purcell
of Cincinnati, Ohio

He awaited Purcell's of January 11, before he answered. He cannot give much information about Father (John) Newman at Randolph since he has not seen him since Purcell's departure from Canton. However, he understands that he has given communion to 100. He speaks of the value of having a German priest visit the Germans in the neighboring missions, and asks Purcell if he can hope for a visit from one. Mr. Johnson and his wife have begun the "confessions" with Father (Mathias) Wurtz. He is investigating the temperance society and its obligations. He receives the Telegraph regularly despite the doings of Protestant postmasters. Some are attempting to build a church without his approbation and in a place not central, while he is endeavoring to build one at Louisville. However since they may fail he will not write more at length. The rest of the congregation is tranquil. He asks Purcell's blessing. (Note on back of letter about John Washington 22 months, son of John Tenley and Hanna Burke).
II-4-h A.L.S. 3pp. 8vo. (French)
6


1842 Feb 2

Kenrick, Peter Richard, Coad., St. Louis
St. Louis, Missouri

to Bishop John Baptist Purcell
of Cincinnati, Ohio

Using the return of Mr. Conahan to Cincinnati to thank Purcell for his kindness while Kenrick was passing through Cincinnati, and to tell him about the St. Louis diocese. He arrived there December 28, having spent Christmas at Cape Girardeau, (Missouri), where the number of the congregation almost equals that of the Vincentians, who have started their novitiate there. All happy especially the English speaking at his arrival. There had been no one speaking English assigned to them. Has arranged to have at least two who speak English. The Cathedral did not disappoint him because he had been warned but he finds that it cost $90,000, most of which is unpaid. The missions are not well supplied with priests and he has constant calls for more clergymen. Needs also German priests 4,000 or 5,000 Germans in St. Louis but he has not one German priest. Suggests that Purcell lend him one. Hopes to start a society to further religious discussion. Sends his regards to his friends.

II-4-h A.L.S. 3pp. 8vo.
6


1842 Feb 2

McLaughlin, Father Peter
Cleveland, Ohio

to Bishop John Baptist Purcell
of Cincinnati, Ohio

Is very grateful for Purcell's of January 29. Has organized a church building society. There is much enthusiasm for the cathedral at Cincinnati at Cleveland, Cuyahoga and Carlisle, and Liverpool has ceased to be disunited. One man came with credentials from the Trustees and a magistrate to collect money. He was beaten by some Germans and became penitent. They have sent McLaughlin a deed but he has instructed them to draw upon one acceptable to Purcell. They want him to visit them but as Father (Basil) Shorb used to visit them he does not know whether he has jurisdiction. Wants to know about stole fees, attendance at funerals, joining a Sabbath observance society, total abstinence Sunday, the age of admission to communion.. Speaks of the transient nature of the people there and at Cuyahoga Falls, The Furnae, Painsville and Vermillion. Speaks of the fallen away and the increased return. Mentions certain converts.

II-4-h A.L.S. 3pp. 8vo.
7


1842 Feb 3

Connelly, Pierce
Gracemere, (Louisiana)

To Bishop (Anthony) Blanc
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

His sister Mary (Peacock) or rather "Sister Peacock" gives them no hope of soon seeing Blanc there in Grand Coteau. As dear Nelie (Cornelia Peacock Connelly) just said, they have a great deal to say to him. Connelly is trying to make arrangements to take Mercer (Connelly) to England in the early part of the summer. He has left it entirely to Lord (John Talbot) Shrewsbury to decide where Mercer shall go. By means of Madame (Elizabeth) Galitzin's goodness, Connelly's wife, with the baby May, is almost in the convent but still it is impossible for him to leave without disposing of the house he lives in. He will probably be not much less than a year away. He has asked $4500 but only $500 cash and the rest at 8% interest so long as the principal could be secured so that in case anything should happen to him and his wife there might be a little provision for Master Pierce Francis (Connelly). Dr. Smith considers the house fully worth that. Connelly is sorry Father (Joseph) Sol(l)er, (S.J.) does not think it well to buy it. Connelly's brother's wife (Angelica Connelly) is still with them and will soon make her First Communion. Their St. Charles Library has about 150 books. In Lord Shrewsbury's letter, dated Rome, November 12, he tells of another Anglican clergyman who has been received into the Church, Reverend Wockerbar of Litchfield. In the box of books addressed to Father de Theux for the library were two packages which Mr. Caserly requested be sent to the bishop's house, one is for Father Darron. Connelly hopes it contains the May number of the Dublin Review in which are some of the churches the great architect Pugin is now building in England, one at the sole expense of Lord Shrewsbury. Connelly asks to be remembered to Fathers Rousselon, Maenhaut, and Moni.

V-4-m A.L.S. 4pp. 4to.
10


1842 Feb 3

Machebeuf, Father Joseph P.
Sandusky City, Ohio

to Bishop John Baptist Purcell
of Cincinnati, Ohio

Is very grateful for Purcell'[s letters and says that if he caused alarm to Purcell by intimating his desire to join a religious community the thought was merely one in dejection and fear at the evils that surrounded him. The church which could not be started last Fall is now twenty feet high and all the materials are ready and he hopes there will be a church ready in the Spring. He has subscribed $50, and has already paid nearly $40. Father F. X. Tschenhenss, and Father Amadeus Rappe are visiting with him. Father (Joseph) McNamee was also doing well when he visited him in Tiffin the other day. Mr. Rappe is always doing wonders in Toledo and Maumee. Machebeuf will also go to Lower Sandusky for two Sundays. Mr. Farrell cannot give his daughter more than $20 now. Has received the church music book. Has a man in the parish who used to play and sing in Detroit and hopes to teach a choir but they have not books at all for the present.
II-4-g A.L.S. 3pp. 8vo.
9


1842 Feb 4

Odin, C.M., Father J(ohn) M(ary)
Galveston, (Texas)

To Bishop A(nthony) Blanc
New Orleans, L(ouisian)a

Odin has just arrived and learning that a boat is to leave tomorrow for New Orleans he hastens to send news. He left San Antonio the Monday after Christmas and barely escaped the arrows of the Comanches and on the third day he almost fell into the hands of a band of robbers. Along the way he visited a great number of Catholic families. What difficulties to overcome in this country! As he was writing this, (Michael?) Menard brought Blanc's letters of last October and November. Odin was far from expecting the sad news Blanc communicated; he hopes His Holiness has deigned to dispense him from an honor of which he feels unworthy and a burden which he is incapable of bearing. Odin cannot set out tomorrow; he will leave by the next boat. Death has taken Father (George Haydon) Hayden.
V-4-m A.L.S. (French) 3pp. 4to.
3


1842 Feb 5

(Hailandière), Cel(estin de la), Bishop of Vincennes
Terre Haute, (Indiana)

To Bishop A(nthony) Blanc
New Orleans, Louisiana

(Hailandière) has Blanc's letter of January 4. Blanc will have received (Hailandière's) asking him to permit Father (Stanislaus) Buteux to try a little collection at New Orleans. (Hailandière) has no opposition to Father (Francis M.) Masquelet's remaining until Easter for devotions for the Germans of whom Blanc spoke. An absence of 8 months in a district 75 miles long can only be harmful but (Hailandière) is happy to make the sacrifice but he could not let Masquelet stay longer. If a priest of his diocese, also a German, who has not been able to come to an agreement with the old priest who is like the founder of New Alsace, could suit Blanc, (Hailandière) would experience less difficulty. His name is Father Con(rad) Schneiderjans of New Oldenburg. (Hailandière) is busy at Terre Haute at the motherhouse of the Sisters of Providence. He gave the habit to 2; there are 20 including the novices and candidates. (Hailandière) believes he has also told Blanc that they have begun an establishment of Brothers (of the Holy Cross). There are already 10 including their superior who is a priest. (Hailandière) asks Blanc to send some one there who can make use of all this.

V-4-m A.L.S. (French) 3pp. 4to.
7


1842 Feb 5

(Purcell), Bishop J(ohn) B(aptist)
Cin(cinnati, Ohio)

To Bishop Ant(hony) Blanc
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

Their episcopal burdens will be the battering ram to get through the gates of heaven. Dubourg, De Neckere, Fenwick and David await them across the same difficulties through which they passed. Has Blanc done what is commanded by Rome in regard to a will? Purcell has not but he will always be a docile child of the Holy Father. Blanc is not to speak to anyone about what Purcell wrote about the man from Richmond; he is a bachelor and Irish, 60 years old. If he is not found this money will go to the church at Cincinnati. Purcell's Father (Edmond Purcell) has been given a leave of some twenty days. Blanc is to receive him with his customary kindness.

V-4-m A.L.S. (French) 3pp. 4to.
2


1842 Feb 5

Smith, L.J.
New Iberia, (Louisiana)

to Bishop (Anthony) Blanc
N(New) Orleans, L(ouisian)a

Their curé's annual visit has furnished Smith with an occasion of addressing Blanc on the subject of their church affairs. He begs leave to suggest a few alterations in the temporal administration. Last April the wardens received and settled the accounts of their late treasurer, St. Marc Darby but there appears to be no disposition on their part to join with Smith to take the responsibility of mortgaging the property to a bank. They wish to abandon it to Mrs. St. Marc; she is too much embarrassed to think of it. As Father (Julian) Priour will inform Blanc there must be some assistance for him and Smith to accomplish the object. Smith's plan is to mortgage the establishment now worth at least $20,000 to the Citizen's bank for $5,500. They can lay by sufficient every year from pew rent to meet the interest and pay their pastor. Their precise situation is: The church of St. Peter to amount and interest paid for construction, etc. of church, presbytery, graveyard, etc. $7,000; amount due Priour $500; amount that can be collected $2,300 leaving a balance of $5,200. Were Blanc to have an act of sale passed to him Smith has no doubt all would be well and the debt finally liquidated. With Blanc's influence and Col(onel) Olin(?)'s and Smith's, there would be no question. Smith will be Blanc's agent for the financial part. If Blanc could visit them it would accomplish wonders. The whole country is well pleased with their pastor; Smith saw 60 persons on one day go to Communion, a greater number than he has witnessed before in all Attakapas during 22 year's residence.
V-4-m A.L.S. 4pp. 4to.
5


1842 Feb 7

Dumartrait, A(drien)
St. Martinsville, (Louisiana)

To Bishop A(nthony) Blanc
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

The letter Blanc sent to Father (Giles F.) Martin, dated January 10, the receipt of which Dumartrait acknowledged on the 20th, was presented today to the administrators who have authorized Dumartrait to thank Blanc for his choice of Martin to serve their church, replacing Father (Charles Henry Boutelou de) St. Aubin and of which Martin was put in charge on January 15. Martin having agreed to receive the same fees as his predecessor, the fabrique is sure that harmony will be preserved.

V-4-m A.L.S. (French) 2pp. 4to.
3


1842 Feb 7

Tschenhenss, C.SS.R., Father Francis X.
Norwalk, Ohio

to Bishop John Baptist Purcell
of Cincinnati, Ohio

Has received a letter from Baltimore to the effect that Father (John) Newman has entered the Redemptorists, also that Father Bayer has likewise joined them. The superior and Purcell have admonished him about getting into law suits. He feels that he cannot help it. It happened while he was on a long mission, the committee having been so much persecuted sought to prevent themselves from being attacked any more on the question of the church debts, by the schismatical party of Father (Joseph) Freygang. Speaks about certain conversions. Met Father Machebeuf and Rappe at Sandusky City.
P.S. Speaks of the deed of the church of St. Michael at Thompson, which has not been recorded and needs to be made over. Also that of Sacred Heart at Richlawn. Asks for German catechisms. Church of Freygang incorporated by the state legislature.

II-4-h A.L.S. 3pp. 8vo.
6


1842 Feb 13

Owen, Richard
New Harmony, Indiana

to O(restes) A. Brownson
Boston, Massachusetts

Although he is not personally acquainted with Brownson, he wishes to obtain information regarding the details of the Common School system in the Atlantic States. His brother, Robert Dale Owen, suggested to him that Brownson probably would take the time to answer the letter. Owen (Richard) recommends a place of education to be extended equally over the United States, beginning with a National Normal School, to which each state might send students in a certain proportion, each state to proceed then to establish State Norman Schools. Students leaving the Normal Schools should be bound to teach in their own county under principles made by the National Normal School. The general funds were to consist of the accumulated interest of the Smithsonian Legacy. To him it has always appeared that too little attention is paid to the physical and moral training of the pupils, particularly the physical. He recognizes the manual labor system of Switzerland as being very efficient. He would appreciate any suggestions connected with Education that Brownson can give him.
I-3-f A.L.S. 4pp. 8vo.
3


1842 Feb 14

McCabe, Martha
Thibodeaux, (Louisiana)

To Bishop (Anthony) Blanc
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

(Martha addresses Blanc as) Mr. Dear Godfather.
She wrote about two months ago but concluded it was lost. Father (Charles Henry Boutelou de) St. Aubin leaves in a few days and she avails herself of it. They are all very much pleased with their parish ministers. The family are all well except Mary who fatigued herself nursing their sick neighbors. Their family is delighted at the thoughts of Father (Charles M.) Menard speaking English.

V-4-m A.L.S. 2pp. 4to.
3


1842 Feb 15(?)

Cohen, Benjamin W.
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

To Bishop (Anthony) Blank(!)
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

Having succeeded in establishing a Vaccine Institution in this city Cohen offers to take the different orphan asylums over which Blanc has jurisdiction, free of any expenses. He already has the Poydras Asylum under his charge and has vaccinated over 40 children. Smallpox having appeared in several parts of the city it should receive the earliest attention.

V-4-m A.L.S. 2pp. 4to.
2


1842 Feb 15

Escoffier
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

Receipted bill for $30 which Father (Stephen) Rousselon owed Escoffier for repairing a painting in the Ursuline church.
V-4-m A. Receipt S. (French) 1p. 16mo.
2


1842 Feb 16

Timon, C.M., Father John, St. Mary's Seminary
Perryville, Missouri

to Bishop John Baptist Purcell
of Cincinnati, Ohio

Received Purcell's of January 31. Recommends the prayers of Purcell that the Vincentians, take over the Cincinnati seminary to God. Will later visit with Purcell and discuss the matter. Suggests that the seminary should be closer to Cincinnati so that the seminarians could take part in the ceremonies. The land is of secondary consideration because the Vincentians could not accept it in their own name even if they took over the seminary. Thinks Mr. Day has sufficient talent but not much. Has a poor character which is not easily bent, partly because of their combination of college and seminary and partly because of his intimacy with Father John Healy. Still suggests that Purcell might try Daly if he needs subjects. Speaks of Mr. W. Hopes that Purcell can do something about him. Has also written to Bishop Kenrick of St. Louis about him. Timon starts tomorrow to attend the consecration of Bishop (John) Odin, C.M.. at New Orleans, and will return at Easter.

II-4-h A.L.S. 2pp. 8vo.
7


1842 Feb 20

Etienne. (C.M.), Father (Jean-Baptiste)
Paris, (France)

To Father (Bonaventure) Armengol
Assumption-La Fourche, Louisiana

Although Etienne has not written for a long time, he is very much interested in the work confided to Armengol. The last circular sent to Armengol told him of their position here. Today their position is less painful, he hopes they will soon come out of this crisis. Armengol's letter of December 22 to Father (Jean-Baptiste) Nozo, C.M.) was not only given to (Father Marc-Antoine) Poussou, (C.M.), it was given to the council and Etienne was commissioned to reply to it. They have been delighted by the good news in his letter. Armengol asked:
1. To be authorized to receive 10,000 francs as a loan, to be repaid at Paris. But he does not say when nor if Father (John) Timon, (C.M.) has approved the use he proposes to make of it. Timon has already used all the funds allowed this year for America. Armengol is to consult with Timon.

2. Armengol asks to be authorized to keep his Mass stipends to give to his parents. It has been arranged with Timon that no priest in America is to keep the stipends but that a certain sum will be given to those whose parents need it. Timon, on his return to America, will have told Armengol of the resolutions passed by the Council that each mission have its administration and resources according to their rule and that the local superior will have all the rights belonging to his office.
V-4-m A.L.S. (French) 3pp. 4to.
4


1842 Feb 21

(Portier) Michael, Bishop of
Mobile, (Alabama)

To Bishop A(nthony) Blanc
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

(Portier) will be pleased to assist at the consecration of Bishop (John Mary) Odin and will prepare the sermon Blanc asks for. (Portier) pities Madame Butler all the more since she followed the course, in spite of his advice, which could only take her further from the goal she proposed. (Portier) does not wish to be troubled any longer by this affair and the young person will leave the convent when her quarter is finished, not to return. (Portier) this year has had more trials and afflictions than since the beginning of his episcopate. Blanc can judge from the enclosed letter (no enclosure) which (Portier) asks him to read and to send to the one it is destined for if Blanc deems it advisable. (Portier) does not think he has given the right to attack his reputation and thereby deprive him of the only good he esteems. Blanc is to read the letter and if in his judgment it should not be sent, and if (Portier) ought to remain under the weight of this ignominy, he will offer up this cross and be silent.

V-4-m A.L.S. (French) 2pp. 4to.
3


1842 Feb 21

(Rosati), Joseph, Bishop of St. Louis
Port-au-Prince, (Haiti)

To Bishop A(nthony) Blanc
New Orleans, Louisiana

The affairs of religion will soon be settled in this country. A concordat has been drawn up and signed; (Rosati) leaves today in Le Berceau to go to Rome by way of Brest, Paris, Marseilles, and Civitavecchia. He hopes to be there in two months and he hopes the Holy Father will accept the plan. The President of Haiti will send a power of attorney to Rome next month. (Rosati) needs Father (Constantine) Maenhaut; he has written him to leave as soon as possible for France and Rome. (Rosati) hopes Blanc will not oppose this; he counts on Blanc's zeal to make Maenhaut determine to do so.
V-4-m A.L.S. (French) 2pp. 4to.
3


1842 Feb 22

(Milde) Vincent Edward, Archbishop of Vienna, President of the Leopoldine Association
Vienna, Austria

to Bishop (Peter Paul Lefevere)
Detroit, Michigan

The funds collected by the members of the Leopoldine Association during the past year allows them to give some to the dioceses of North America, As President of the Association (Milde) has to see that the intentions of the donors are carried out in the distribution. For the German Catholics of (Lefevere's) diocese he transmits the sum of 5,000 florins. N.C. voted in the session of February 14, to be paid through Baron Rothschild of New York. For this purpose he asks (Lefevere) to accept the sum in American dollars. He urges (Lefevere) to draw up accounts of the state of religion in his diocese for arousing the lethargy of the members of the Association. Father Joseph Salzbacher of the metropolitan church and director of the Association is coming to America towards the end of April and (Milde) asks cooperation for him especially in gathering information. (Note: answered July 15, 1842).
III-2-g L.S. (Latin) 2pp. 8vo.
3


1842 Feb 22

Milde, Vincent Edward, Archbishop of Vienna, President of the Leopoldine Association
Vienna, Austria

to Bishop John Baptist Purcell
of Cincinnati, Ohio

The charity of the people of Vienna shown in what Leopoldine Association has raised for the American dioceses. As President of the Association the archbishop has to see that the money is properly distributed and used for the missions especially among the German people of America. At a session on February 14, in Vienna, the Association set aside 3000 florins for Cincinnati. Asks that Purcell write and tell him how much the money which has been sent by Rothschilds to New York amounts in American dollars. Also urges Purcell to write accounts of the diocese so that they may appear in the printed reports of the Association. Recommends also to Purcell Father Joseph Salzbacher of Vienna who will visit America about April as a member of the Association, suggesting that he help Purcell in preparing a report for the Association.

II-4--h A.L.S. 2pp. 8vo. (Latin)
5


1842 Feb 23

Kenrick, Peter Richard (Coadjutor), Bishop of St. Louis St. Louis M(iss)o(uri).

To Bishop (Peter Paul) Lefevere
Detroit, M(ichiga)n

Kenrick sympathizes with Lefevere in his many trials but has no doubt that God will enable him to remedy the evils of the past and make religion flourish. He is edified by Lefevere's zeal to eradicate intemperance. He refers to his own pastoral, accompanying the letter, in which he approves of temperance societies and mentions the work started in that line by Father (George) Hamilton. Things were in a neglected condition when Kenrick arrived (in St. Louis). He has made so many changes that he fears Bishop (Joseph) Rosati will be surprised. Father (Edmund) Saulnier has quit the diocese, and is replaced by Father (James) Fontbonne. The transparencies have been removed from the windows of the church, which were a nuisance. More important, English sermons have been substituted for French at Sunday Mass. Kenrick knows Lefevere would not blame him for this if he were aware of the circumstances. In six months the English congregation would abandon the cathedral when the Jesuits open their new church; in that event Rosati would be a bankrupt. His debts are upwards of $50,000. The ten small houses which Rosati built near the site of Trinity Church are untenanted. Kenrick wants to know when to expect Lefevere in the spring as he intends to visit Arkansas early in the season.

III-2-g A.L.S. 4pp. 8vo,
5


1842 Feb 23

(Kenrick), Francis Patrick, B(isho)p of Arath and Coadj(utor) of Phil(adelphia)
(Philadelphia, Pennsylvania)

To Bishop Peter Paul Lefevere
Detroit, Michigan

Kenrick is happy that the affairs of Detroit are likely to be settled to Lefevere's satisfaction; he thinks that the Sacred Congregation should be informed of the actual state of things, and that Lefevere should seek from B(isho)p (Frederick) Résé the most ample kind of power of attorney with regard to Résé's real and personal estate in Detroit. If Lefevere gets the power of attorney he can consult with legal authority about seeking the return of church property now in other hands. Kenrick advises on taking possession of Church property. He sympathizes with Lefevere in his afflictions but is confident that consolations await him. He has not heard of C.C. ( ) for many years.
P.S. Kenrick has just given Father B( ) McCabe his exeat. If he comes to Detroit, Kenrick says he is imprudent and inconsistent and solicitous about money. B(isho)p (Joseph) Rosati arrived safe at Port au Prince (Haiti).

III-2-g A.L.S. 3pp. 8vo.
5


1842 Feb 26

Bellune, Duchesse de
Versailles, (France)

To Bishop (Anthony Blanc
New Orleans, Louisiana)

She received his answer to her letter of November 15. From what he writes he sees that the family of M(iss) I(zabel) was certain of her return to America. She has acted only for the good of her husband and family. If hate had not blinded the family and they had acted together, it is more than likely that this young lady would not be where she is at present. They accuse her husband of a second trip which Bellune believes is not correct in comparing the dates of his arrival at N. and that of his departure. If (Blanc) has received her letter from Havre he sees that Bellune asks him not to give her husband the money she had placed at his disposal in her preceding letter as his draft in October took all their funds. She has received several letters from her husband. In one he said that if he could find a refuge for I(zabel) and if Bellune would send him 5000 francs, in two months he would be in Europe. She told him that she would authorize a draft only when she saw him. (Blanc) is not to tell anyone except Baron Burthe. If I(zabel) would trust herself to Bellune she would do all she could for her. Since Bellune does not know her husband's plans she does not wish him to have any money except in case he decides to use it in the way he has promised.
P.S. (Blanc) is not to communicate her husband's plan to the correspondent of I(zabel's) family.

V-4-n A.L.S. (French) 8pp. 12mo.
3


1842 Feb 26

Fransonius, Cardinal J. Ph.
Rome, Italy

to Bishop John Baptist Purcell
of Cincinnati, Ohio

Includes the letter of Pope Gregory XVI dated February 22, asking prayers for the church in Spain. (Printed Form)

II-4-h D.S. 1p. 8vo. (Latin)
2


1842 Feb 26

Lamy, Father John
Newark, Ohio

to Bishop John Baptist Purcell
of Cincinnati, Ohio

Mr. Cornelius McCarthy has given the deed for the lot for the church. Lamy quotes the deed about Purcell's rights and asks if according to the deed a part of the lot could be sold in case that were the only way a church cold be built. Asks for two altar stones, so that he would be prepared in case he broke the one he now has. Julius Brent's mother will soon be a good Catholic. Has been very anxious to learn about religion since her sone went to college.

II-4-h A.L.S. 2pp. 8vo.
3


1842 Feb 26

McCaffrey, Father James
Beverly, Ohio

to Bishop John Baptist Purcell
of Cincinnati, Ohio

At the request of Mr. John McCune he writes this letter asking Purcell to tell Mrs. Rogers that Mr. McCune's wife, Mrs. Rogers daughter, had died Friday the 25th in her confinement. She was resigned and had the best medical care. Asks that this note be made in the Telegraph. Mrs. McCune asked that her mother come and take care of the children and Mr. McCune seconds her request. The funeral was held at Meigscreek and was well attended. Asks that the courtesy of the Protestants be mentioned in the Telegraph. McCaffrey has not been feeling well.
P.S. Mr. Rogers returning to Cincinnati stopped at Beverly. Mrs. Rogers is to be told this. Mr. McCune desires 10 or 12 copies of the Telegraph containing the notice.

II-4-h A.L.S. 3pp. 8vo.
3


1842 Feb 28

Hughes, B(isho)p John, Coadj(utor and) Adm(inistrator) of N(ew) Y(ork)
New York, (New York)

To (Bishop Peter Paul Lefevere, Coadjutor and Administrator of Detroit)
(Detroit, Michigan)

Hughes has complied with Lefevere's request regarding the letter to the Archbishop (Vincent Edward Milde) of Vienna. Lefevere may be at a disadvantage as the Archbishop has a strong prejudice against Bishop (Frederick) Résé and his affairs. Lefevere has found enough to learn that the office of bishop is not a sinecure. Hughes trusts Lefevere will pay a visit after he gets things in order. Father ( ) O'Cavanagh called on Hughes who advised him to enter some religious house. Hughes thinks that the man cannot do much harm. Hughes had a letter from B(isho)p (Joseph) Rosati who thinks well of prospects of his mission to Haiti.

III-2-g A.L.S. 1p. 8vo.
6


1842 Feb 28

Ludington, D(aphne) A.
Sweden, (New York)

To O(restes) A. Brownson
Boston, Massachusetts

She says it is a long time since she saw him, and if it were not for his books she would think he had forgotten her. She expected him to write, and later to visit, but supposes he had more important business. She received all his books save one which someone took from the post office under the pretext of delivering it to her. As far as she has read there are strong arguments presented by him she admits. James has read them more than she has and for a time was interested in the religion of the Catholics. As for her, she must either seek a new religion or continue in the one she now professes. She trusts that God will set her right, but urges Brownson not to have hard feelings against her because she cannot see as he sees. She says all the family was ill at some time this winter, but all are well now. She thanks Brownson for his kindness and asks him to write.

I-3-f A.L.S. 3pp. 8vo.
1


1842 Feb 28

Rappe, Father Amadeus L.
Toledo, Ohio

to Bishop John Baptist Purcell
of Cincinnati, Ohio

Asks Purcell to inform the Superior of the Sisters of Notre Dame that he had understood that they could found a house in Toledo and has secured a house for that purpose. Since they say that they have not been authorized to found any such house he has had to change his plans, and feels that the donor of the lot has had to make other plans for his two girls. Suggests that the Sisters make arrangements with their superiors that would allow them to found such houses when the need arose. Feels the need of a convent. Has a First Communion class, and several converts. Desires 100 books of controversy. Has made the first payment on the debt, but was sorry to see Purcell's own distress. The Protestants need a church. He will sell the clock first, rather than let them have his church again. Asks for Purcell's blessing. Is delighted with the Telegraph.

II-4-h A.L.S. 3pp. 8vo.
4


1842 Feb 28

Walter, W.J.
Philadelphia, (Pennsylvania)

To Bishop (Anthony) Blanc
New Orleans, L(ouisian)a

The lively interest Blanc takes in Walter's "Catholic Family Library" gives Walter confidence. Blanc will remember that in the Council in Baltimore, $600 was loaned to Walter from the "Book Fund" for carrying on the above work. Nos. 2 and 3 appeared of which Mary of Scots formed the subject. He had hoped the sale of this book would liquidate his debt; instead it has cleared little more than $100. A second edition of "Sir Thomas More" was demanded and a call was made for a volume of "Selections" from the works of the Chancellor. Involved in debt, Walter was unable to fulfill his promise. (Fielding) Lucas, (Jr.) of Baltimore was named as willing to carry on his work. All Lucas allows him is $75 for 1000 copies. However Walter consented and the volumes have appeared. Walter has a family to support and such compensation will not enable him to do so or to make good his obligations to the Book Fund. When he was induced by Mr. Martinez to accompany him to Washington, Walter was in receipt of about $200 per month for tuition in New Orleans. His duty to his family will compel him to return to his former employ. In the meantime he has accepted the office of clerk at $40 per month. In over-hours he has brought out the volume of "Selected Translations" from St. Chrysostom but this is too severe a task for his health and eyesight. The remedy is to publish his own books with his own subscription list. 2000 names at $1.50 a year would enable him to carry out his plans. He asks Blanc whether a quota of two hundred names can be found in his diocese. He has addressed the same query to Blanc's brother prelates. His "Life and Times of Cardinal Wolsey" and of "Cardinal Pole" are nearly ready.
P.S. At the moment of dispatching his letter, he has a satisfactory reply from Bishop (John) Hughes in which he says he hastens to offer his encouragement and should he receive enough encouragement to proceed, Hughes would send $100 in advance.

V-4-m A.L.S. 4pp. Folio
5


1842 Mar 1

Bineaud, (Francois)
Fausse Rivière, (Louisiana)

To Bishop Anthony Blanc
N(ew) Orleans, (Louisiana)

Terance Samson, at whose house Bineaud lives, and Bineaud ask Blanc to send them the page of the "Bee" with the act of amendment of the corporation of St. Francis Church at Pointe Coupée. They have urgent need of it in the interests of Father (Jean) Martin, their pastor. It concerns the election of trustees which was held last Saturday. It is to be addressed to Bineaud, schoolmaster at Samson's. Mr. and Mrs. Samson send their respects.

A.L.S. (French) 2pp.

Enclosure:

Other residents ask Bineaud to inform (Blanc) of the present trustees. Three of the old ones have resigned, Gustave Delamare, Jean Laurent and Pierre Bonenchau. The new ones are: Laurent (Chitz) Chutz, ex-president and author of troubles existing up to this day; Valeri le doux, one of the ones who looted the church at Fausse Rivière on June 21; J(ea)n B(aptis)te Bergeron. The election was a plot and these new trustees wished to give Martin the key to the presbytery. Martin refused it. Other residents propose making up a petition in his favor.

Note (French) 2pp.

V-4-m A.L.S. Note (French) 4pp. 8vo. & 16mo.
11


1842 Mar 1

Lartigue
Assumption, (Louisiana)

To Bishop (Anthony) Leblanc(!)
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

Lartique of Maubourguet in France, who had the honor of speaking to (Blanc) three years ago on his coming to Louisiana, having spent one year in Ascencion parish as a teacher and for two years having conducted the public school in the second district of Assumption parish, addresses (Blanc) for a second time. Lartique wishes to enter the seminary near him to receive Holy Orders in due time if (Blanc) finds him worthy. He will furnish papers attesting to his conduct in Europe from an early age. He asks (Blanc) to send a reply to Paincourtville before the end of the month so that if it is negative he can keep his place.

V-4-m A.L.S. (French) 3pp. 4to.
1


1842 Mar 2

Kenrick, Peter Richard, Coad. Bishop
St. Louis, Missouri

to Bishop John Baptist Purcell
of Cincinnati, Ohio

Profits by a return of the bearer to Pittsburgh to send Purcell this letter. Before Purcell's letter he had heard of Father (Clement) Hammer's visit to New Orleans, and regrets that Purcell was deprived of his services as well as that of Father Edward Purcell. In case Purcell crosses the ocean he hopes that he will try to get German priests for him and he would pay for any additional expense involved. Speaks of the need of German speaking priests and suggests the possibility of a German seminary. Otherwise he fears that the growing German population will be deprived of religion. Has instituted a Temperance society but not like the administrator of Detroit. Has discontinued the French sermons because they were driving the people from the church. Bishop Rosati had let himself be influenced by the Creoles into keeping them. All the French can speak English now and if they did not come to church, the Cathedral would be lost with its debts, since they were so dependent on the Sunday collections. Rosati will not cordially approve but Kenrick says he has filled the Cathedral, almost an unusual occurrence in the history of St. Louis Cathedral. The debt is $50,000. Trinity church foundation has been laid but he does not know when the superstructure will be built. Has removed the coverings from the windows of the church and allowed in more light and air. Mr. Biddle is about to build a female asylum, and he has some not very clear prospects for a seminary.

II-4-h A.L.S. 4pp. 8vo.
7


1842 Mar 2

Ledoux, Valery
Pointe Coupée, (Louisiana)

to Bishop Ant(hony) Blanc
New Orleans, Louisiana

They have never needed Blanc's presence in their parish as they do now. Religious harmony is totally destroyed; no one but Blanc can remedy it. Will they be condemned to spend the season of the Passion without services? Ledoux offers Blanc his house, a horse and carriage and a servant for his use. The presbytery needs repairs and the trustees wish to make them without delay. Father (Jean) Martin, who has not lived in it for almost a year, is opposed to giving them the keys. So they will be obliged to use the rights given them by law; Blanc's intervention would avoid this.

V-4-m A.L.S. (French) 3pp. 4to.
3


1842 Mar 4

Peirce, Isaac B.
Trenton Falls, (New York)

To O(restes) A. Brownson
Chelsea, Massachusetts

He apologizes for not answering Brownson's letter, and thanks him for the January number of "The Quarterly." He says it is the only one he received since 1840. He liked the two leading articles on theology and wishes he were privileged to spend an evening with him now and then to discuss these interesting themes. He is disgusted where he is. After 25 years of faithful work the people want a young, fashionable minister. If it were not for his Newport friends he would be totally unemployed as a minister. He has supported himself and his two daughters. He would like to move to New England thinking he will try again to find employment there. He asks Brownson if he knows any wealthy friends who would like to back him to the extent of one or two hundred dollars a year. He has some views for a new church which he would like Brownson to see when he communicates them to paper. Also a manuscript hymn book. He will bring them along when he comes to New England. He has labored on his farm through the year. He doesn't mind the hard work, but he would like to get his daughters out of it so they may pursue a suitable livelihood in keeping school.
I-3-f A.L.S. 4pp. 8vo.
1


1842 Mar 9

Juncker, Father H(enry) D.
Chillicothe, Ohio

to Bishop John Baptist Purcell
of Cincinnati, Ohio

Undertakes to write in English. Has formed a Temperance circulating library society, towards which each member gives six cents. Lists the books which he has already placed in this Library of Catholic books. Suggests that Bishop Purcell contribute towards the library. Hopes that Father (Joseph) Ferneding will come soon as some of the parishioners would rather confess to a stranger. Asks for some incense and asks about the interpretation of the marriage laws of the recent council. (Included in this is a letter to Purcell from) W. Marshall Anderson offering to have the Temperance Society Library act as agents for Catholic books. Suggests as advised by Father Juncker what books they feel they should have. Some notes of Purcell on the back about Luke Borgman, etc.

II-4-h A.L.S. 4pp. 8vo.
6


1842 Mar 10

Gale, Levi H.
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

A receipt for $9.39 from Father (Stephen) Rousselon for freight from Havre on the Clinton. C. Fassy(?) signs for Gale.
V-4-m Receipt 1p. 32mo.
2


1842 Mar 15

Latapie, S.
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

To Father (Bonaventure) Armengol
(Assumption, Louisiana)

A bill for $112.41 for groceries. (Armengol writes in the margin asking) Father (Stephen) Rousselon to pay it. E. Dreux receipts the till for Latapie. Rousselon (writes on the back): Seminary.
V-4-m Bill (French) 2pp. 8vo.
3


1842 Mar 16

Sanduie, Fred(eri)c, Treasurer
Lyons, (France)

To (Peter Paul) Lefevere, Bishop (of Zela)
Detroit, (Michigan)

Sanduie informs Lefevere that following the allocation given his missions by the councils of the Propagation of the Faith he is authorized to draw on Messrs V. Guerin and sons of Lyons a sum of 760 francs 75 c(entim)es in a draft payable on sight. In accordance with the accounting regulations of the Lyons council Sanduie sends under this cover the said draft. Lefevere is to fill it out putting in the date and, in all letters, the date above his signature. The Council's banker is obliged to pay only on a draft detached from the council's book to stubs like the one here joined.
P.S. The gifts forming the amount of the draft here joined are, for Lefevere 605.-75, for Father (Florimond) Bonduel 105.--, for Mr. Vaerlop 50.--, totaling 760.-75.

III-2-g L.S. (French) 1p. 8vo.
3


1842 Mar 19

Wheland, David, Seminary of St. Sulpice
Paris, France

to Bishop John Baptist Purcell
of Cincinnati, Ohio

Expresses his gratitude for Purcell's letter. Has met the new seminarian O'Meally who will write to Purcell himself about his experiences. Thanks his brother for the plug of tobacco he sent. Does not expect to sing the lamentations. Is pleased that he is well remembered at Cincinnati. He has become better accustomed to the trials of the seminary but fears to spend two more winters there. Speaks of the severe discipline of St. Sulpice. Speaks of the examinations which have just passed with a compliment from M. Carbon. M. Garnier still speaks English. Father (Joseph) Carriere, S.S. was surprised that Purcell had not received the books. Is sorry that Purcell has had to suspend work on the new cathedral. Bishop Vincent Whelan wrote to him that he was making alterations in his cathedral in Richmond and hopes to start a seminary. He has even suggested that David might have to take charge of it. Sends his remembrances to his friends.

II-4-h A.L.S. 4pp. 8vo.
6


1842 Mar 19

Wood, James F.
Rome, Italy

to Bishop John Baptist Purcell
of Cincinnati, Ohio

Has received Purcell's of December 29. Explains his delay in answering because of his attempts to get an answer from the Superior General of the Franciscans about the two Bavarian Franciscans who were to have gone to Cincinnati. After his first failure he wrote again and received word that because of the disturbed conditions in the Bavarian province the missionaries could not be sent. Wood, however, did not tell the cardinal of Purcell's proposed visit to Europe to get German missionaries. Has been sorry to hear of the recent disturbances in Cincinnati and of the mobs against the banks, although he has enjoyed the funny scenes described by Father Edward Purcell. Young Mr. Collet leaves for St. Louis and by him he hopes to send letters to his family. Asks that Purcell give certain funds to his mother since a friend whom he called upon has failed to answer. Feels that he should learn German but the press of other classes prohibits this. Thinks he may ask to spend some months after this third year in Germany among the people to learn the language. Is grieved at the actions of Mr. Montfort. Feels that Father (Ferdinand) Kuhr is doing little to reestablish his character. Speaks of the jubilee published on the settlement of the difficulty in Spain. Has mentioned to Father (John) Grassi the need of certain teachers in the college of St. Francis Savier in Cincinnati but he offered little hope.

II-4-h A.L.S. 4pp. 8vo.
7


1842 Mar 17

Leonard, J(?)
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

To Bishop (Anthony) Leblanc(!)
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

Leonard, parish judge of Plaquemine, received (Blanc's) letter of the 9th about Mrs. Jane Kelly. (Blanc) can be assured that Leonard will do all that is expected of him, according to law, for her to have her son and return to New York. (Blanc's) recommendation is a certain guarantee for this lady; Leonard has promised her to conclude her affair as soon as possible.

V-4-m A.L.S. (French) 2pp. 4to.
2


1842 Mar 20

Laurans, J(ean)
Pointe Coupée, (Louisiana)

to Bishop Ant(hony) Blanc
New Orleans, Louisiana

At the last meeting of the trustees of St. Francis Church, a resolution was taken to inform Blanc of their desire to see harmony and peace restored in their parish. Therefore Laurans asks him to dispense them from paying Father (Jean) Martin the immense amount he lays claim to and for which he has instituted court proceedings. It is absolutely necessary for the trustees to wait for the decision of the court before paying any sum whatsoever. Trustees elected later could hold their predecessors responsible for the money which in Laurans's opinion is not legitimately due to Martin. Blanc will no doubt reply that the trustees did not inform him of the withdrawal on December 31, 1835 of the decree of July 1, 1834, which had allowed $1000 a year to Martin but Martin should have informed Blanc for the contract was destroyed with his consent. Are they responsible for the faults of their predecessors and are they condemned to see their churches abandoned and their children growing up in ignorance? They beg Blanc to come and put an end to this state of things. Laurans offers Blanc his house, a carriage, and a servant for his stay in their parish.

V-4-m A.L.S. (French) 3pp. 4to.
3


1842 Mar 22

Ledoux, Valery
Point Coupée, (Louisiana)

to Bishop Ant(hony) Blanc
New Orleans, Louisiana

Ledoux has had Blanc's letter of the 13th since the 14th. Ledoux believes that the sentiments of the other members of the corporation are the same as those expressed in the letter of the 2nd of this month; that is, to establish union, peace, and understanding between the pastor and parishioners. Ledoux hopes that the contents of this letter will be such that Blanc will feel justified to intervene. The silence which their predecessors kept about Blanc's last letter was not because they were not disposed to return what their predecessors had taken but rather because they thought they did not have the right to return it. Toward the end of 1835 the trustees withdrew from Father (Jean) Martin $1000 which they had agreed to allow him. Ledoux admits that they were wrong in adopting this measure without previous communication with Blanc. In March or April, 1837 Martin instituted a law suit against the trustees to reclaim the $1000 and other sums due him. As a consequence the trustees have always doubted their right to make any arrangement with Martin while the case was still in court. In 1838 or '39 Martin proposed to arrange things by arbitration but he refused to accept the decision. Ledoux hopes that Blanc will never be obliged to interdict their churches. If the trustees think they can govern the church they are wrong. He himself is far from entertaining such an idea. The trustees have not had a meeting since Ledoux received Blanc's letter; he hopes at the next meeting to show it to them and do all he can to achieve the end they all desire.

V-4-m A.L.S. (French) 4pp. 4to.
3


1842 Mar 23

Paisant
Baton Rouge, (Louisiana)

To Bishop (Anthony) Leblanc(!)
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

Paisant begs (Blanc's) pardon for bothering him so many times to recall what he promised about Father (Joseph) Evrard. Paisant has not yet received what Evrard owes him for his work. The present pastor has just told him that Evrard is at New Orleans and so Paisant asks Blanc to help him collect it.
(P.S.) Blanc is to see that Paisant himself or the pastor gets it.
V-4-m A.L.S. (French) 2pp. 4to.
2


1842 Mar 25

Olislayons de Meylandt, M.J.
Tournay, (France)

To Bishop (Peter Paul Lefevere)
(Detroit, Michigan)

With pleasure he remembers the Bishop and tells him how much the people of Tournay rejoice in his elevation, more for their interest in the missions than for him because the Bishop assumes a new burden not beyond his powers but one which will fatigue him and increase his reward in heaven. He sends two embroidered cushions made by the students of St. Andre who have charged him to send them. These ladies have also the ingenious idea of having a lottery of the little work of their novices for the missions. Although forced to sell the chances at a high price, they made 605 francs 75 centimes which will be included in the allocation sent from Paris. Olislayons recommends to Lefevere Father (Florimond) Bonduel who is working at Green Bay, (Wisconsin)> He has received a letter from him and Bishop (Frederick) Résé has told him in Paris that Bonduel is a very energetic missionary. He asks Lefevere's prayers for his aunt Madame de Theux de Meylandt who died three days ago. She had ten children. She lost seven of whom five were students. Among the other three were Father de Theux, the Jesuit and Count de Theux, the Minister of State. Madam Olislayons and her niece send their regards and ask his prayers.

III-2-g A.L.S. (French) 3pp. 8vo.
4


1842 Mar 27

DeGoesbriand, Father Louis
Louisville, Ohio

to Bishop John Baptist Purcell
of Cincinnati, Ohio

Takes the occasion of the bearers going to Cincinnati to send the news to Purcell. The young man goes to Cincinnati on receiving the news that his sister, and another girl by the name of Lamielle have renounced their faith. DeGoesbriand hopes the news is false because they had the faith when they left Louisville. Recommends them to the zeal of Purcell. Has received a letter from M. Galais saying that Father Carriere has sent a box to Purcell for him. DeGoesbriand says he has not received it. Mr. Galais also said that he delayed his letter to Purcell because he hoped to have a subject for the diocese but since there were some difficulties he waited until they had been cleared away. Asks for the chalice, stone, etc. for the church of St. Genevieve. Also asks about the holy oils, also about the ornaments which the Sisters of Notre Dame were to make for him. Suggests that the bearer offers occasion for sending things. Has sent M. Gallais [Galais] a translation of Mr. Anderson's letter. Has received a letter from his Father who is resigned to their separation but hopes now that they will meet in heaven. Recommends him to Purcell's prayers.

II-4-h A.L.S. 2pp. 8vo. (French)
3


1842 Mar 27

Kenrick, Peter Richard, Coadjutor Bishop of St. Louis St. Louis, Missouri

to Bishop John Baptist Purcell
of Cincinnati, Ohio

Takes advantage of the return of Mr. Conahan to Cincinnati to answer Purcell's letter. He is disposed to accept Jordan but cannot at once authorize him to go to the Barrens. The Seminary of St. Mary has been a failure at the Barrens and the superiors of the Vincentians know it themselves. They think that the seminary should be in the city and away from the college. Feels inclined to ask the people of St. Louis to erect a seminary and think he will announce this plan next Sunday. Thinks to build it on the site of the old chapel. It has already cost Bishop (Joseph) Rosati $3000 and also $16,000. Another reason is that he has been informed that for a new orphan asylum which must be built, a new site has been given elsewhere. When it is removed, that will leave room for an extended seminary. Hopes that Purcell will not go to Europe this summer because he fears disturbances, because of the good will now prevailing in Cincinnati towards Catholicity. Is pleased that Purcell has purchased and paid for considerable of the materials for his new church. Rev. (Clement) Hammer seems to like St. Louis. Kenrick intends to accompany him into Arkansas. Gives Purcell the reason for removing the transparencies from the Cathedral windows and describes the reactions to his change in the language of the sermons so that Purcell will not believe that he acted without adequate motives.
II-4-h A.L.S. 4pp. 8vo.
7


1842 Mar 27

Lynch, Anne C.
Providence, (Rhode Island)

To O(restes) A. Brownson
Boston, Massachusetts

She has delayed her reply through the fact that she has had a young lady staying with her for painting lessons. The young lady who she thinks will be eminently successful as a miniature painter. So if she does not succeed herself in taking the pictures of her friends she shall be able to collect her gallery through the young lady. She intends to have a portrait gallery of her friends and favorite authoresses. She will burn them as they fall off and play renegade. She thanks Brownson for his argument on immortality. She believes in it herself although not, perhaps, in the same way. She knows she cannot be annihilated, but she must pass into the great Soul of all or into some other manifestation of Him. And to her, this is a sublime destiny. She hears that Mrs. Park is performing wonders in the way of Magnetism and wonders has he seen any of her experiments. She is anxiously awaiting the latest "Quarterly." She hopes to be able to visit Boston in the Spring, so she can see how the Philosophy is coming on.

I-3-f A.L.S. 3pp. 8vo.
2


1842 Mar 28

Capelle, B(aron)
London, (England)

To Bishop (Anthony Blanc
New Orleans, Louisiana)

On last December 3, Capelle replied to (Blanc's) answer to his first letter out of respect for (Blanc's)interest so strangely abused by a man who doubtless has no right to (Blanc's) charitable confidence and who made (Blanc) believe that he had separated from his victim in order to send her back to her family. But now it seems apparent he has carried her off a second time. It is important that (Blanc) make sure of this. Capelle's testimony comes from a former minister of the French king, now in exile in London and is guaranteed by the Cardinal of (Blanc's) native city. (Blanc) must have been convinced by the letter, enclosed in Capelle's reply, from the prefect of Bordeaux telling such a positive way of the return of the pretended Madame de Beaumont to New Orleans. Capelle hopes for a few lines from (Blanc) however discouraging they may be to this respectable and unfortunate family.
V-4-m A.L.S. (French) 4pp. 4to.
2


1842 Mar 31

(Eccleston), Archbishop Samuel
Baltimore, (Maryland)

To Bishop (Anthony) Blanc
New Orleans, L(ouisian)a

(Eccleston) submits the following note of the printer of the Provincial Councils and Rituals. By appointment of the Holy See, the publication has been made under the direction of Bishop (Joseph) Rosati. The Compendium Rituales Romani is priced from 60 cents a copy to $2 (according to the binding and number of copies ordered); Concilia Provincialia from 60 cents to 75 cents. The Ritual is ready now; the Councils will be ready about the middle of April. These works, published by order of the last Provincial Council (1840), scarcely need (Eccleston's) recommendation.
(P.S.) Orders are to be addressed to John Murphy, printer.
V-4-m L.S. 3pp. 4to.
4


1842 Mar 31

(Eccleston), Samuel, Archbishop of Baltimore
Baltimore, Maryland

to Bishop John Baptist Purcell
of Cincinnati, Ohio

Submits the announcements of the printer, John Murphy, concerning the publication of and prices of the Compendium Ritualis Romani, and the Concilia Provincilia, prepared under the supervision of Bishop (Joseph) Rosati. The Ritual is ready and the Concilia will be ready in April. The small Rituals will be ready about the first of June. The orders are desired as soon as possible and are to be sent to Murphy.

II-4-h L.S. 2pp. 8vo.
4


1842 Mar 31

(Rosati), Joseph, Bishop of St. Louis
on board Le Berceau at Brest, (France)

To Bishop A(nthony) Blanc
New Orleans, Louisiana

(Rosati) wrote from Port-au-Prince telling that God had blessed his mission, that he would return to Rome to complete what he had begun, that he had absolute need of Father (Constantine) Maenhaut at Rome and asking him to come as soon as possible. Fearing that his letter may not have reached Blanc he repeats the same request. They left Port-au-Prince on February 22 and arrived here on Easter. He could not have been treated better. Father Cessant is lodged with the officers who like the Captain are true French gentlemen. The pastor of Brest came to see (Rosati) yesterday and offered his house. (Rosati) cannot stay long; they will leave tonight for Paris. After two weeks he will go to Marseilles and from there to Civitavecchia by steamboat. He does not believe he can return to the United States before Autumn. If he can be of use to Blanc in Rome, he is to address his letters to Propaganda.

V-4-m A.L.S. (French) 3pp. 12mo.
3


1842 Mar 31

(Rosati), Joseph, Bishop of St. Louis
On board Le Berceau near Brest, (France)

To Father John Timon
Perryville, Missouri

(Rosati) has already informed Timon of the good success of his mission to Haiti; this has rendered indispensable his return to Rome to meet there the envoyé of Haiti for the conclusion of their affair. (Rosati) found this ship of war at Port-au-Prince and has been very respectfully treated by all. The Captain lodged him in some of his apartments; Father Cessant has been with the officers. They left Port-au-Prince on February 22 and arrived here on Easter. This morning they landed at Brest. The pastor and all the clergy were at the landing. After dinner (Rosati) paid a visit to Admiral Privel, Commander in Chief of the navy at Brest. The admiral came to the parish house to invite (Rosati) to a dinner next Monday and was very sorry to hear that he was going to start tonight. Next Sunday they will arrive in Paris and remain there two weeks. Then they set out for Marseilles, from there to Civita Vecchia by steamboat. He may not be able to return to the U(nited) States before fall. He hopes a bishop will soon be appointed for Haiti. The Haitian government will assist him to clear the Island of the wolves who under the clothing of shepherds are destroying the flock there. He must have many holy clergy to fill their places. As Spanish is the only language understood in a great portion of the Island, (Rosati) thinks the gentlemen of that nation could do an immense good there. He hopes he will succeed in obtaining some of them. Is Bishop Odin consecrated? Timon is to write (Rosati) at Rome.
V-4-m A.L.S. 4pp. 12mo.
4


1842 Apr

(Eccleston), Samuel, Arch(bisho)p of Balt(imore)
Baltimore, (Maryland)

To Bishop (Peter Paul Lefevere)
(Detroit, Michigan)

Shortly before the death of Bishop (John) England of Charleston (South Carolina), Eccleston received a letter written by England's direction. An extract from it follows: In t he event of England's death, Father Richard S. Baker is to be administrator as Vicar Capitular until the nomination of a successor in that nomination, England desires that Baker be principally named, adding the names of Fathers John Barry and Jeremiah F. O'Neil to supply the requisite number. Eccleston is not acquainted with the priests mentioned but considers England's recommendation as all sufficient. Orders for the Ritual, etc., are to be directed to "John Murphy, Printer, Baltimore."
III-2-g A (partial) L.S. 2pp. 8vo.
6


1842 Apr 1

(Everett, Alexander H.)
Jefferson College, Louisiana

to O(restes) A. Brownson
Chelsea, Massachusetts

He is much obliged for Brownson's courteous and partial remarks in regard to him. He claims no merit for having treated with respect and attention a countryman whom European intellectuals consider entitled to their highest intellectual distinctions. He has sought Brownson's acquaintance for nothing but the pleasure of his conversation and has long hoped that chance would throw them into the same circles. He regrets that the college has not the means of tempting him into Louisiana by offering him a chair in Philosophy. A permanent situation of this kind would permit him to pursue his studies with more advantage. The result of Brownson's attempt to defend the system of (Victor) Cousin was the same as his own a few years ago. He was strongly biased in favor of Kent, but when he reconsidered the subject he found himself adhering to Locke rather than refuting him. There is not much to object to in Locke, he thinks, except his one great error in doubting the reality of moral sentiments. He looks forward with impatience to the coming out of Brownson's work. As to his won he is engaged in making arrangements for bringing out some of his articles and addresses.

I-3-f Signature cut out 4pp. 8vo.
3


1842 Apr 1

Moni, Father L(ouis)
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

A receipt for $28.18 received from Bishop (Anthony) Blanc for postage for himself, Rousselon, Marivault, Vezian, Buteux, Perché, and the Sisters of Charity.

V-4-m A. Receipt S. (French) 1p. 8vo.
1


1842 Apr 1

Quemper, I(sa)dore A(ntoi)ne
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

Quemper received from Father Constantin(e) Maenhaut five piastres for payment in full up to this date for R(oma?)no Fernandez.
V-4-m A. Bill S. (French) 1p. 16mo.
2


1840 Apr 3

(Chanche), Bishop John Joseph
Natchez, (Mississippi)

to Bishop (Anthony) Blanc
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

(Chanche) a few days ago received a letter from Father (Augustin) de Angelis of Blanc's diocese requesting permission to spend some time at Pascagoula, Mississippi. De Angelis says he owns some property there and that he will build a church on it if (Chanche) will allow it. (Chanche) wishes to submit the subject to Blanc that he may tell him what is best to be done. Bishop Michael Portier spoke of some property at Pascagoula in the hands of a clergyman in Blanc's diocese. It was well that (Chanche) will not stop at Donaldsonville; he would not have gotten here for Sunday. He has commenced the church in very bad times but he did not foresee them. No money is to be got here of any kind. He sold some blue backs yesterday at 40 per cent. This is bad news for Father (Stephen) Rousselon. (Chanche) thinks he will sell Rousselon's $70 tomorrow.

V-4-m A.L.S. 3pp. 4to.
6


1842 Apr 5

McLaughlin, Father Peter
Cleveland, Ohio

to Bishop John Baptist Purcell
of Cincinnati, Ohio

Has many things to speak about. Asks if he may go to Detroit to renew his oil stocks. Asks for the privilege of binating on Sunday because of the crowds that attend his church. Asks about the participation of Catholics in temperance celebrations on the 4th of July when that includes part of a service in a Protestant church. Speaks of an offer for part of the town school money for his school provided that no religious exercise be held in the school. Speaks of the very high esteem in which the Catholics are held in Cleveland, being considered the fashionable church in the town. Has a prominent convert whose name is Converse. Had a fine St. Patrick's day celebration but not as solemn as that of Purcell. Has not had much time to take care of Liverpool. Has left the decision as to which church they will go to, up to Purcell. Will send the deed for the brick church whenever Purcell asks for it. Speaks of the number of communicants during Easter week at Liverpool, Carlisle, Cleveland and St. Mary's, in all about 550 communicants. Speaks of the sermons he has preached. As to the golden case he will be content with whatever results. The church has been improved since Purcell's visit, especially by the gift of some paintings.
P.S. Asks Purcell to tell Father Collins that he cannot find Mrs. Hynes. The bearer, Mr. Charles Waldron, is waiting.

II-4-h A.L.S. 4pp. 8vo.
6


1842 Apr 5

Provosty, Aug(uste)
Pointe Coupée, (Louisiana)

To Bishop Anthony Blanc
N(ew) Orleans, Louisiana

Valery Ledoux, to whom Jean Laurens showed the letter Blanc wrote him lately, has just told Provosty that it was Blanc's intention to soon send a priest to assist Father (Jean) Martin to prepare for Confirmation. This gives Provosty the hope of being able to fulfill his religious duties at his marriage to Elis(abe)tha (?) Labry toward the end of this month.

V-4-m A.L.S. (French) 2pp. 4to.
5


1842 Apr 6

Bineaud, (Francois)
Fausse-Rivière, (Louisiana)

to Bishop Anthony Blanc
N(ew) Orleans, (Louisiana)

Bineaud writes about the scandalous scene which took place there on Easter. Constait Bedeau, one of the trustees, held a service something like the one held by the French Catholic Church in France. He dressed in a cassock and surplice accompanied by two others dressed the same. Many were present; Bedeau had announced Blanc's arrival for that day, saying that Blanc was coming to bring a priest for Father (Jean) Martin's place. Many believed it for Valeri le Doux, a new trustee, was supposed to have said that Blanc had announced it in a letter Blanc had written le Doux. They had Mass at Michael Olinde's on Palm Sunday, Holy Thursday, and Easter but those that were there were fearful and others did not come because they feared a disturbance. It recalled to Bineaud the time of the French Revolution of '89. Why does Blanc not come to stop the troubles which have existed for so long? What a consolation it would be for Bineaud who is now preparing 10 young people for First Communion, and for the pastor who will bring them together for that ceremony on Corpus Christi. Mrs. Térance Samson sends her respects and hopes that Blanc will come to see her. P.S. He has just been told that Blanc is to arrive on the 16th of next month to give Confirmation. Since the two churches have been profaned, Bineaud thinks that the first service Blanc will offer will be a High Mass of reparation.

V-4-m A.L.S. (French) 4pp. 8vo.
7


1842 Apr 6

Brassac, Father H(ercu)le
Paris, (France)

To Bishop A(nthony) Blanc
New Orleans, Louisiana

Blanc's letter of February 5 arrived four days ago. This delay was explained by a fog which prevented the mail from being put on the English steamer for Europe. He, too, was put out by the decision of Father de la Treiche about his trip to Louisiana. He thinks the principal reason that influenced him was the pecuniary advantages. If Brassac can find someone suitable he will do his best to send him but he is not hopeful. The bishops of France wish more than ever to keep their good subjects. Brassac rejoices with Blanc over the success of the seminary and the first results of his recruitment. It is time that the country began to furnish its own. In leaving Louisiana Brassac left some notes at the State Bank; the last two should be paid in the first days of May; one is for $5,000, the other for $500, signed by Marcel Ducros and endorsed by Rodolphe Ducros and Philippe Marsoudet. He sends his draft No. 1 enclosed for this sum and will send a duplicate on the English boat on the 19th. Blanc will oblige Brassac if he will send the money by the first steamboat. If part of this money, say half of it, would be of use to Blanc and in exchange Blanc would send a draft on the allocation made him by the Propagation of the Faith, allowing him 6 per cent, Brassac would be happy to be of use. He authorizes Blanc to do anything necessary in his name either to claim the money at the bank or to reclaim the mortgage which Ducros guaranteed. All his wealth is in this sum, $2000, given him in 1819 by Mrs. Smith in gratitude for services rendered. If his bank book is needed, Blanc is to ask Narcisse Landry at Ascension. Since Bishop (Joseph) Rosati is writing to Blanc, Brassac will say nothing about him except that he is well though a little thin from his trip to Santo Domingo.
(P.S.) Brassac encloses an order on Father (John Boullier, C.M.?) Bouillée payable at Brand and Landry which is to be added to the other draft.

V-4-m A.L.S. (French) 4pp. 4to.
9


1842 Apr 8

Capelle, B(aron)
London, (England)

To Bishop (Anthony Blanc
New Orleans, Louisiana)

Capelle thanks (Blanc) for his letter of February 23 and expresses his appreciation for his charity toward one who has so much to repent of if she were not still the victim of a perversity which has thrown her once and then again into an abyss of impenitence. The family does not seem ready to receive with the mother the child who would be a living testimony of the dishonor of which no trace must appear in England, a scandal for the two young sisters. The uncle awaits more calm before writing to (Blanc). Capelle saw by (Blanc's) letter that Madame de Bell(une) was redoubling her pleas to (Blanc) to aid her in bringing back her husband, the Father of eight children. But she does not foresee the destruction which would follow his return to France. The Father and uncle of his victim are only prevented in their vengeance by lack of the fortune lost in the revolution. Capelle has only one hope, that the young lady would come back alone to her grandmother, who idolizes her.

V-4-m A.L.S. (French) 4pp. 4to.
2


1842 Apr 9

Brassac, Father H(ercu)le
Paris, (France)

To The Cashier of the Louisiana State Bank
New Orleans, Louisiana

After May 8 next the cashier is to pay Bishop A(nthony) Blanc $5,500 and charge it to Brassac's account.

V-4-m A.D.S. 1p. 12mo.
2


1842 Apr 9

Martin, Mr. Louis
Point St. Ignace, (Michigan)

to Father (Florimend) Bonduel
Green Bay, Wisconsin (Territory)

The buildings which Bonduel began to build are all just as he left them. How they (at Point St. Ignace) should like to have him back! It is impossible to get any rent for Bonduel's farm from the Bourasau's and the others. Nothing from Bishop (Frederick) Résé's farm either as Mr. Carron will pay only Bonduel. The priest who is here celebrated Mass ten times last year, and this winter only twice. Martin does not think that is right. He also complains about the priest's ingratitude toward him notwithstanding what he has done for the Church. He claims the priest made him give a contract for the place before the church and school house. He is enclosing the paper in the letter for Bonduel to judge for himself. The school is done away with so Martin asks Bonduel for help in the education of his children, especially his oldest son who is not well and cannot do hard work. He is unable to pay but asks Bonduel to take his oldest son and teach him to read and write, or put him in some school. All the strayed flock send their best respects to their first Shepherd and beg him to come back. (In the papers of Bishop Peter Paul Lefevere of Detroit).

III-2-g A.L.S. 2pp. 8vo.
5


1842 Apr 10

Young, Father Joshue M.
Lancaster, Ohio

to Bishop John Baptist Purcell
of Cincinnati, Ohio

The bearer, Mr. Anderson, begs the care of the Bishop to make spiritual exercises since he cannot do so in Lancaster. Young says that Anderson has a better grasp upon his religion than he had at his own conversion. Gives the news of the town, about Mr. Garaghty, Mr. Boyle, Mr. Moore. Suggests that Father Edward Purcell gives a public address by appointment at Columbus, whenever he passes. He retains the Logan deed to procure a better one. Asks for German books if Purcell has any, since Father Juncker has suggested that he has some.
Note in Purcell's handwriting that James Moore, Mr. Newbold's brother 21, is a prisoner in Sante Fe, (Mexico) suggesting that the receiver of the note write to the Bishop of New Orleans to speak to the Mexican consul about him. (Also) "Maria Quatriana thirty in Illinois, May 17, 1842."

II-4-h A.L.S. 3pp. 8vo.
9


1842 Apr 12

Connelly, Pierce
Gracemere, (Louisiana)

To Bishop (Anthony) Blanc
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

Can it be possible that Connelly will have to set off for England without one day or one hour with Blanc? Father (Victor) Jamey tells him that it is doubtful when Blanc will be at Grand Coteau; God grant Blanc may pay them a visit before he goes to Natchitoches. All arrangements are made and Connelly expects to leave in the beginning of May so that Mercer (Connelly) may be under Madame (Elizabeth) de Galitzin's charge on the voyage. She leaves New York for England in the last of May. The (Jesuit) Fathers have taken the house and he is grateful especially to Father (Peter J.) Verhaegen, (S.J.) though they will not pledge even the $2500 Connelly asked. On the last Thursday of the month they have a public sale to dispose of their furniture and pictures and then his wife (Cornelia Peacock Connelly) will take up her abode with the Ladies of the S(acred) H(eart) in the little cottage until he sends for her. He has told the Fathers that he has no doubt Blanc will grant them the ground on which the cottage stands for 99 years but Madame (Maria) Cutts and he have not ventured to guaranty it for more than fifty. When Connelly gets to New Orleans he will come straight to Blanc.

V-4-m A.L.S. 3pp. 4to.
9


1842 Apr 13

Carriere, Father (Joseph)
Paris, France

to Bishop John Baptist Purcell
of Cincinnati, Ohio

Thanks Purcell for the news sent by Mr. O'Mealy. Carriere regards him as worthy of Purcell's interest and promises to try to take good care of him. The expenses have been reduced as much as possible and hopes that they may be reduced more as he approached the end of his studies. Lacking a favorable occasion he has not sent his third volume of work on justice but hopes to send it with the box to be sent by M. Galais to Father DeGoesbriand. Today he sends two compendia that he had published. He is working on a treatise on contracts which has not as yet been printed. Is contented with Purcell's praise of MM. Picot and Verna. The latter's son has been in the seminary but has had to return to Lyons for his health. He will be happy if Purcell goes to Germany because by that he hopes to see him in Paris. Bishop (Joseph) Rosati has been in Paris for some time. Carriere has not seen him but it appears that he has been more successful at Santo Domingo than Bishop England. The Association of the propagation is now considering the distribution of his funds but M. Brassac will send the results to Purcell.

II-4-h A.L.S. 2pp. 12mo. (French)
5


1842 Apr 14

McLaughlin, Father Peter
Cleveland, Ohio

to Bishop John Baptist Purcell
of Cincinnati, Ohio

Thanks Purcell for his letter of the 7th, and promises to do what ever Purcell wishes. Expects to have about 50 for confirmation including those from Vermillion, Carlisle, Painsville, Cuyahoga Falls. However he must know the exact day of Purcell's visit because those living away from Cleveland lack means of conveyance. Suggests that Purcell and Father (Martin) Henni, the Vicar General stay a week at his house on Water Street. Wants Purcell to decide whether it is easier to go to Detroit or to Father DeGoesbriand's for the oils etc. Speaks of the fervor of the congregation at Avon, and of the laxity of the men at Vermillion Furnace. He will be in Liverpool on the 25th. The Germans in Cleveland are happy because they made their Easter duty. Speaks of the affair with Mrs. Golden. The bill as presented is for $1000. His lawyers Boten and Kelly have conferred with him and he has agreed to pay her $416. She has presented to them bills for other sundries about which McLaughlin asks Purcell what to do.
P.S. His congregation is all day laborers, even the boys and girls. They could pay their debts until they received this Golden one. Mr. Golden had agreed not to trouble them.

II-4-h A.L.S. 4pp. 8vo.
10


1842 Apr 16

B(elinaye), Marquis de la
London, (England)

To Bishop (Anthony) Blanc
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

B(elinaye) asks pardon if his reply to Blanc's of February 7 reflected his agitation. He hardly spoke of the gratitude his whole family feels at Blanc's efforts to solace the anguish caused by the crime of the infamous (Victor) B(eauclerc). Blanc's last letter confirms what they already knew, her return. She is again in his hands. His own family and all who know him tell them to be on guard. This supposed separation and all he said to Blanc was calculated to allow him to escape punishment. They cannot consent to receive with her this living proof of her shame. The reason this crime has not been avenged is because of the means of a family almost ruined by two revolutions. If they were convinced that the young lady would separate forever from this scoundrel then only would they give her refuge and spare her the reproaches merited by her conduct. As to the being she would like to bring along, rather than to receive it, they would walk over the dead bodies of the eight children of this rascal. B(elinaye) asks Blanc to have regard for the feelings of an uncle whose whole life has been honorable, closely united by friendship with the family into which this man married. He has not ceased to be a good friend of the mother-in-law, wife and sister-in-laws. The latter were innocent of the facts all too well known by their mother, the Portuguese Vicomtesse de Juramento. (Belinaye) tried to help them in these difficult times. He gave help to their brother, who committed suicide since, to replace a sum he lost in gambling in Paris. Baron Capelle agreed to act as arbiter between B(eauclerc) and a business house in London for credit in the name of the Infante, Don Miguel of Portugal, who revoked all his powers in disgust. The Infante is in Rome; Blanc can easily learn from him what he thinks of his agent. B(elinaye) knew nothing of his past history until alarming letters came from his wife of the disappearance. Soon came the wife, his sister-in-law and his brother. These ladies had known for a long time that he was depraved although the wife was very attached to him. If Blanc wishes, B(elinaye) could tell many things about this man. P.S. In spite of their efforts, Blanc must have had some expenses in postage. B(elinaye) would like to reimburse him or to give the amount to some church.

V-4-m A.L.S. (French) 8pp. 4to.
4


1842 Apr 16

(Eccleston), Archbishop Samuel
Baltimore, (Maryland)

To Bishop (Anthony) Blanc
New Orleans, L(ouisian)a

Shortly before the death of Bishop (John) England of Charleston, (Eccleston) received a letter of which the following is an extract: "In the event of England's death the administration will remain in the hands of Father Richard S. Baker as Vicar Capitular until the nomination of a successor. In that nomination England desires that Baker be the person principally named. Father John Barry and Father Jeremiah F. O'Neil to be also named, not because he thinks them equally qualified but to supply the requisite number of names." (Eccleston) is not acquainted with the above mentioned but forwards their names in the order assigned. In (Eccleston)'s recent letter respecting the publication of the Ritual, etc. he should have mentioned the orders are to be forwarded to John Murphy, printer. (The first part of this letter is written in another hand).

V-4-m A.L.S. 3pp. 4to.
6


1842 Apr 16

(Eccleston), Samuel, Archbishop of Baltimore
Baltimore, Maryland

to Bishop John Baptist Purcell
of Cincinnati, Ohio

Shortly before his death Bishop (John) England of Charleston, S.C., sent a letter to Eccleston stating his desire that in the event of his death he wished Father Richard S. Baker to be administrator as Vicar Capitular until the nomination of a successor. In that nomination he also made Father Baker first choice with Father John Barry and Jeremiah F. O'Neal to be named to supply the required number. Eccleston says he is not acquainted with the men mentioned but that he will send the names to the Holy See as the dead bishop's
recommendations.
P.S. In his recent communication about the ritual he forgot to say that orders were to be addressed to John Murphy, Baltimore.

II-4-h A.L.S. 2pp. 8vo.
7


1842 Apr 17

Lanaux, Ph.
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

Permission for his Negress, Severine, to have her baby baptized.
V-4-m A.D.S. (French) 1p. 32mo.
0


1842 Apr 18

Brogard, Father J(oseph) N(icolas)
Baton Rouge, (Louisiana)

Answers to questions (constituting a census) of St. Joseph's Church of East Baton Rouge and (an account of the church finances and furnishings). Brogard's birth date is May 27, 1810; he was ordained September 29, 1838 in the Chapel of the Visitation, Georgetown, D.C.; appointed to St. Joseph's on January 1, 1842.
V-4-m A.D.S. (French) 3pp. 4to.
1


1842 Apr 20

David
Caracas, Venezuela

to Bishop Anthony Blanc
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

For a long time David has wanted to write to Blanc but he wanted first to see the Archbishop of Caracas who returned only the Monday of Holy Week. Mrs. David and Isabelle attended all the services at the Cathedral. Bishop (John Anthony) de la Pena plans to answer Blanc's letter; he will tell Blanc that Venezuela has an archbishop at Caracas and two bishops, one for Merida and one for Guiana. Their trip was very fine; Blanc's priests contributed not a little to it. He received a most flattering welcome from the President and other officials of Venezuela and he hopes to be of some use to his fellow countrymen. David signs as Consul General.
P.S. Mr. Germain will bring these lines.

V-5-e A.L.S. (French) 4pp. Folio
4


1842 Apr (20)

(Eccleston), Archbishop Samuel
Baltimore, (Maryland)

To Bishop (Anthony) Blanc
New Orleans, L(ouisian)a

Shortly before the death of Bishop (John ) England of Charleston (Eccleston) received a letter of which the following is an extract: "In the event of England's death, the administration will remain in the hands of Father Richard S. Baker as Vicar Capitular until the nomination of a successor. In that nomination he desires that baker be the person principally named. Father John Barry and Father Jeremiah F. O'Neil to be also named, not because he thinks them equally qualified but to supply the requisite number of names." (Eccleston) is not acquainted with these gentlemen but cannot further comply with the requisition of the 2nd Provincial Council than to forward their names to the Holy See. (The first part of the letter is written in a different hand).

V-4-m A.L.S. 3pp. 4to.
5


1842 Apr 20

St. Romes, J.C. de
(New Orleans, Louisiana)

To Bishop (Anthony) Blanc
(New Orleans, Louisiana)

A receipted bill for $6 for a six months subscription. J.B. Rochebrun signs as receiving payment for St. Romes.

V-4-m A. Bill S. 1p. 16mo.
2


1842 Apr 22

McFarland, J(ohn) A.
Wapakoneta, Ohio

to F(rancis) P. McFarland Mt. St. Mary's College
Emmittsburgh, M(arylan)d

In answer to his request for information about moneys received from him his Father lists the amount, the date received and by whom. The expenses of commencing housekeeping and farming in a new country are very great and without the money he has sent, besides the money his sister (who apparently writes most of the letter) gives, they would not have succeeded. They will shortly be able to repay him. The sister took the chills and fever and had to leave St. Mary's but she is getting well again. At Wapakoneta they have a German priest who comes two Sundays a month. They have a band for music in the church. They have had a backward spring and made little sugar. In time they expect to have good crops. In the spring election Mr. McFarland was elected a trustee and J.E. was made a supervisor.
I-l-a A.L.S. 2pp. 4to.
2


1842 Apr 24

McCaffrey, Father James
Marietta, Ohio

to Bishop John Baptist Purcell
of Cincinnati, Ohio

The bearer, Mr. James Waters, desires a letter of introduction to Purcell in order to help him find employment in Cincinnati. McCaffrey speaks of the progress of the total abstinence pledge in his missions. At Meigs Creek all the adults with the exception of one family took the pledge. He speaks also of the money given to Mr. Shirlock. Mr. Taggart wants to send his two boys to the college or seminary under the direction of Purcell. Thomas may make a worthy candidate for the holy ministry. McCaffrey has not received the holy oils yet. He leaves the next day for Guernsey and Monroe Counties. He is sorry that Father Edward Purcell did not stop on his way to or from Zanesville.
II-4-h A.L.S. 3pp. 8vo.
8


1842 Apr 25

Gardner, Melzan
Wethersfield, Rocky Hill, P.O. (Connecticut)

To O(restes) A. Brownson
Boston, Mass(achusetts)

His sojourn in Virginia ended in complete disappointment. Brownson no doubt shares in his chagrin that the friends of John C. Calhoun should lose the race to Martin Van Buren by difference. The connection that he had with the Republican paper terminate somewhat abruptly. He discusses his own and (Theophilus?) Fisk's attempt to establish a newspaper at Richmond, Virginia. He is promised assistance in attempting to obtain the appointment of Clerk of the Courts for Hartford County which pays $1500 to $1700 a year.
I-3-f A.L.S. 4pp. 8vo.
3


1842 Apr 26

(Purcell), Bishop J(ohn) B(aptist)
Cincinnati, (Ohio)

To Bishop (Anthony) Blanc or Father (Stephen) Roussillon(!) New Orleans, (Louisiana)

Maria Johnson, sister of Sister Angela is on her way to (New Orleans) and desires a letter to Blanc. (Purcell) endeavors to convince her that there will be no difficulty in her going into the convent to converse as much as she pleases with her sister. How they are all afflicted at the death of Bishop England! Father (Peter Francis) Beaupre(z) wants to come to (Purcell's) diocese; Blanc is to say what he recommends.

V-4-m A.L.S. 2pp. 4to.
5


1842 Apr 27

(Blanc), Ant(hony), Bishop of N(ew) Orleans
On board the DeSoto

to Father (Stephen) Rousselon
N(ew) Orleans, (Louisiana)

Tomorrow morning (Blanc) will probably land at Pointe Coupée. He spent 6 days at Natchitoches; he will then be able to go to Baton Rouge for the Sunday in the Octave. It is probably that he will return to (New Orleans) for Pentecost, at least if he does not go to the seminary. He will have to go up again before June for the parishes of Iberville, Ascension, etc. Father (Edward) D'Hauw will go on down because (Blanc) does not know how the two of them would be received at Pointe Coupée. (Blanc) does not know if D'Hauw will be able to do anything more; Father (V.) Jouanneau(l)t must be allowed to continue. Rousselon is to settle with D'Hauw for the advances made during their trip.

V-4-m A.L.S. (French) 2pp. Folio
5


1842 Apr 28

Kenrick, Peter Richard, Coadjutor Bishop of St. Louis Gov. Morehead, Mississippi

to Bishop John Baptist Purcell
of Cincinnati, Ohio

Kenrick sends this by the kindness of the clerk of the boat on his way to New Orleans. He has just learned casually of the death of Bishop (John) England of Charleston, whose loss he feels that all must feel. He speaks of the recent return of England from Ireland with reinforcements for what he considered the hope of his diocese, the Ursulines. During the rough passage he attended to the wants of his fellow passengers, and when he arrived in Philadelphia at the request of the bishop he gave a course of 15 or 16 lectures, of which Kenrick speaks highly. Kenrick has just returned from a visit to Arkansas at which he has had merely to "glance" because of a disappointment by a boat. He feels the need of a bishop there. At present there is but one priest, ordinarily two, who live off the Sisters of Loretto, who have houses at Little Rock and at the Post. Kenrick feels that this cannot be tolerated and that if there were a bishop who could speak English with some priests they could easily find support. The upper part of the state is filling up. Kenrick believes that Illinois also should have a bishop since the Bishop of St. Louis cannot take care of the people. He has decided to move the seminary to St. Louis on the site of the old chapel. When he has moved the seminary he will be ready to receive the gentleman who Purcell suggested. Has not heard of Bishop (Joseph) Rosati, except what he sees in the advocate.

II-4-h A.L.S. 4pp. 8vo.
14


1842 May 1

Berlié, Paul Joseph
Plaquemine, L(ouisia)na

to Bishop A(nthony) le Blanc(!)
New Orleans, Louisiana

A fine Catholic church has been built at Plaquemine but the means of the inhabitants and subscribers do not permit them to finish it. It lacks only the plastering of the vault, the altar, pews, and whitewashing. The people, who are almost all Catholic, seek diversion by going to the Protestant church on Sundays. Berlié has proposed giving a lecture or sort of sermon every Sunday. He writes to ask permission. Blanc has known Berlié for a long time; he gave him a letter of recommendation to enter St. Mary's of the Barrens seminary where he was for 2 years. For 4 years he was a pharmacist at (New Orleans) and 14 months ago established himself at Plaquemine where he has a store and also has relatives. He is distressed at seeing the church empty; at the least encouragement the people would take courage to finish it.
(P.S.) The bearer of this letter is Augustin Perron, a good Catholic. (P.S. 2) If Blanc replies, Berlié asks him to send a little address in the letter to the people of Plaquemine so that Berlié can read it to them on Sunday.
(P.S. 3) Perron cannot take the letter; Berlié will send it by boat.
V-4-m A.L.S. (French) 3pp. 4to.
3


1842 May 1

(Louisiana), New Orleans, Treasury of the 3rd Municipality New Orleans, (Louisiana)

A receipt for $9 from Bishop (Anthony) Blanc for 1841 taxes on Sq(uare?) 61, $2,000. Signed by Du Gany, treasurer.

V-4-m Receipt S. 2pp. 32mo.
2


1842 May 1

Lynch, Anne C.
Providence, (Rhode Island)

To O(restes) A. Brownson
Boston, Massachusetts

She does not feel as much interest in metaphysics as formerly. She thinks that men who introduce questions of great political value are more important than metaphysicians. She says that he has probably seen by the papers what is the state of politics in her section. She believes that when (Thomas W.) Dorr is inaugurated no violence is to be apprehended unless from a mob. A friend of hers said that Brownson is at the bottom of all this movement they are only carrying out his doctrines. Conservatives fear that suffrage (Women's Rights) will be unsuccessful. She does not object much to his saying that the lady poets are spoiling literature with their sentimentalizing. But she insists that the men are equally as bad, though there are exceptions on both sides.
I-3-f A.L.S. 3pp. 8vo.
2


1842 May 3

Bourgeois, Widow Jean B(aptis)te
Thibodauxville, (Louisiana)

To Sister (Francis) Regis, Orphan Asylum
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

Bourgeois has just heard that Sister has circulated evil reports about the conduct of her daughter Camilla (Bourgeois). It is not her intention to write reproaches or to blame Sister; she wishes only to give the habits and character of her daughter while she was under her care which are quite the opposite of capriciousness, rebellion, lying. The evil inclinations have taken root only since she has been at the convent; a bad friend can ruin a child. Bourgeois had the Bishop's permission to leave her there for three years; if Sister sends her to her she will send her back. In leaving her under Sister's care she gave her all her rights as a mother; if she is naughty it is better to correct her than send her away. Bourgeois sent her to be instructed in every respect, not as Sister says, to make her First Communion and Confirmation.

V-4-m A.L.S. (French) 3pp. 4to.
2


1842 May 3

(Chanche), Bishop John Joseph
Natchez, (Mississippi)

To Bishop (Anthony) Blanc
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

(Chanche) wrote some weeks ago about Father (Augustin) de Angelis who had expressed a wish of going to Pascagoula. As he is in Blanc's diocese (Chanche) would not correspond with de Angelis before he knew from Blanc that he might do so. He was anxious to know something about the property in his name which (Chanche) is induced to believe belongs to the church at that place. He asks Blanc to let him know what he thinks. The Church of America has suffered a severe loss in the death of Bishop (John) England; his lingering illness had made (Chanche) anticipate it. Archbishop (Samuel Eccleston) has written on the subject of his successor. (Chanche) knows nothing of Father (Richard S.) Baker. (Chanche) drew on Blanc for $150 in favor of Father (M.D.) O'Reily; on that day he could not even sell blue backs. The church is going on in spite of the times.
(P.S.) He received the frames(?) and crosier; he thanks Blanc and Father Rousselon.

V-4-m A.D.S. 4pp. 4to.
6


1842 May 3

Chanche, John Joseph, Bishop of Natchez
Natchez, Mississippi

to Bishop John Baptist Purcell
Of Cincinnati, Ohio

Has received Purcell's of March 29. John Foley has been arrested and is now in jail but more testimony may be required to convict him. Chanche suggests that Purcell and Bishop O'Connor send such testified writings on the subject as they have. When he goes to Vicksburg, which will be shortly, he will inquire about Frances I. Jamison. Has not yet seen Mrs. Col. Gordon. Many are returning to the practice of their faith. He regrets that Father Edward Purcell and Mr. and Mrs. Springer did not visit Natchez when they passed. He asks if Father Goesbriand has received a box for him and if he will send it by boat. Notes the loss of Bishop (John) England of Charleston and speaks of the great loss to the church. He has received a letter from the Archbishop about the successor but does not know the man. He speaks of an attempted repeal meeting that resulted in damage because of the conduct of Mooney. He will not go East but will remain on the battlefield. If he goes he will visit Cincinnati. Asks that Father Edward Purcell not pass by the next time without visiting Natchez.
II-4-h A.L.S. 3pp. 8vo.
7


1842 May 4

O'Sullivan, J(ohn) L.
New York, (New York)

To O(restes) A. Brownson
Boston, Massachusetts

Though he has never had the opportunity of a personal introduction to Brownson, he feels justified in addressing him as an acquaintance. He says that often we know better the man between whom and ourselves an ocean has rolled, than our next door neighbor with whom we have superficial relations. It has occurred to him that a mutually satisfactory arrangement may be reached about the two works they edit respectively. He has heard that Brownson wishes to resume his activity of viva voce preaching. So he thinks that Brownson's Boston Quarterly Review might advantageously be merged with the "Democratic Review" and thus concentrate their efforts for the cause in one review. Brownson would get better compensation and the "Democratic Review" would enlarge an already satisfactory
subscription list. He asks Brownson to consult his publishers and to let him know if they are favorably disposed towards the arrangements.
I-3-f A.L.S. 2pp. 8vo.
3


1842 May 6

Bailey, Thomas W.
Hudson, Ohio

to Bishop Anthony Blanc
New Orleans, Louisiana

It is hardly possible that Blanc can recollect who Bailey is but when at Vincennes, Blanc pledged himself as sponsor, should Bailey's parents die. It is now long since. Bailey left home a short time ago in search of an institution where he could get an education by means of good health and the joiner's trade. Aunt Evelina has died. It is now two years since Bailey left home; he has been here one term only. Bailey has always been told that Blanc christened him with his surname; Bailey calls it White and uses W. for the initial. Seeing Blanc's name in other reading prompted Bailey to write. A visit from Blanc to Vincennes would be hailed with joy.

V-4-m A.L.S. 4pp. 4to.
2


1842 May 7

Ilsley, John H.
Donaldsonville, (Louisiana)

To Bishop Ant(hony) LeBlanc(!) or Father (Matthew Bernard) Anduse(!)
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

Enclosed (no enclosure) is a copy of the answer Ilsley intends filing in the suit of the congregation of the roman Catholic Church of St. Francis of Pointe Coupée versus Father (Jean) Martin and also interrogatories to be answered by the Bishop, Anduse and such witnesses as may be able to give any information. The answer and interrogatories are to be submitted to Mr. Janin, counsel for the plaintiff, and then enclosed to Ilsley by mail on Thursday as he wishes to leave on Sunday for Pointe Coupée. The Bishop promised to prepare some important information. The Court meets the 18th.

V-4-m A.L.S. 2pp. 4to.
5


1848 May 7

(Miles), Richard Pius, Bishop of Nashville
Nashville, Tennessee

To (Bishop John Baptist Purcell)
of Cincinnati, Ohio

Acknowledges (Purcell's) letter of the 30th in which he expressed his willingness to be Miles's heir. He tells (Purcell) that he need fear no difficulty in the letter from his neighbors, and adds the words of the decree about the handling of the ecclesiastical goods. He says that the court of Rome must distrust the Americans. The latest news from Vienna is that a Canon from that city will visit America shortly to see how the German Catholics of the U.S. are being treated. The words of this spy will be implicitly believed. They must "give him plenty of blarney." He is happy he does not have many Germans in his diocese.
II-4-h A.L.S. 2pp. 8vo.
3


1842 May 7

Zéringue, Widow
New Orleans,. (Louisiana)

Zéringue gives permission to her Negress, Eulalie, to have baptized her son named Eugène born September 10, 1841.

V-4-m A.D.S. (French) 1p. 16mo.
0


1842 May 9

Perisse Brothers
Paris, (France)

To Father (Jean-Baptiste) Etienne, C.M.
(Paris, France)

Receipted bill for $186 for books.

V-4-m Receipt (French) 2pp. 12mo.
1


1842 May 9

Prevost, Maur(i)ce
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

Prevost gives permission to his Negro, Paul, to marry Nancy. Father E(tienne) R(ousselon) adds that the nuptial blessing was given them on May 18, 1842. Witnesses: Madame Celestin, Miss Felice, Mr. Pierre.

V-4-m A.D.S. (French) 1p, 12mo.
1


1842 May 10

Aliquot, Marie Jeanne
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

Aliquot received from the Ursulines 1000 piastres which is returned to her according to the act which she signed.

V-4-m A.D.S. (French) 1p. 32mo.
1


1842 May 10

Berlié, P.J.
Plaquemine, (Louisiana)

to Bishop A(nthony) Leblanc(!)
New Orleans, Louisiana

Berlié wrote last week about permission to give a lecture to the Catholics here in the church they have almost built and to ask for a little speech to the people, who are almost all Catholics. Berlié promised to give the first lecture on the 24th. Berlié counts a great deal on having Blanc's speech and permission.

V-4-m A.L.S. (French) 2pp. 4to.
2


1842 May 10

Tyler, R.A.
Charlestown, (Massachusetts)

To O(restes) A. Brownson
Boston, Massachusetts

She wants to have a chat about woman's rights and their matters. She says that woman will soon have all the men under their thumbs. But seriously she says she could never marry a man she did not feel willing to obey. As to man's much vaunted superiority, she admits that the extraordinary men are superior in number and degree to the extraordinary women; but she believes that the ordinary men and women are extremely alike. But she is not deeply impressed with the importance of woman's rights. As for politics, she believes men make themselves ridiculous enough in that field without any assistance from the women. She doesn't believe much in the "sensibility" of people who use this as an excuse to treat others' feelings as they want to. She has seen nothing of Byron in Brownson's "Review." She asks why he doesn't write about him and praise him to the skies. She can never recollect what a wicked one he was, and when she hears him abused, she is ready to cry with grief and vexation. But she cannot resist reading wherever his name is mentioned. She read the "Review" with pleasure and wanted to talk about it. But when she begins to write she doesn't know where to stop.

I--3-f A.L.S. 4pp. 8vo.
2


1842 May 12

Johnson, E.R.
(New Orleans, Louisiana)

His servants, Henry Montague and Elizabeth Wood, have Johnson's permission to be married.

V-4-m A.D.S. 1p. 32mo.
2


1842 May 15

Armengol, Father B(onaventure)
Assumption, (Louisiana)

To Bishop Ant(hony) Blanc
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

It appears from a letter Armengol has just received from Father (P.J.) Doutreluingne that Blanc has not received the letter Armengol sent to Pointe Coupée. Armengol asks Blanc to let them know what day he plans to give Confirmation. (Claude) Lunel has finished his theology and is preparing for the priesthood. Armengol has sent Brother Borgeisa, the bearer of this, to choose an iron cooking pot as he is going to become their cook. (Peter) Lucas is enjoying good health now; all the others are well.

V-4-m A.L.S. (French) 2pp. 4to.
5


1842 May 16

(Odin), Bishop John Mary
Galveston, (Texas)

to Bishop A(nthony) Blanc
New Orleans, L(ouisian)a

Their crossing was short and very pleasant. The volunteers, come to increase their number on the field of battle, behaved very well. (Odin) found the people of Galveston quite quiet. They complain much about the hard times and speak seriously about the necessity of invading Mexico. There are almost 2000 men at Corpus Christi; 500 are about to leave Galveston to join them and they expect 1000 or 1500 from New Orleans and Mobile. Shortages are felt especially in the West and corn is so scarce many must go without bread. (Odin) received a letter yesterday from Father (Michael) Calvo, C.M. in which he told of the pitiable state to which the Mexicans in San Antonio had been reduced. Calvo has received much opposition from Father Refugio de la Garza but he has been supported by most of the people. The former pastor said Mass once or twice but seeing that the Mexicans were going to withdraw he followed them. Blanc is to ask Mr. Vezian if he put a box of spermaceti candles on board at New York; they cannot find them and the boat officers do not recall receiving it. So far (Odin) has not found a house; he has taken a room at (Michael?) Menard's. He sends greetings to Fathers Rousselon and Maenhaut and all at the bishopric.
V-4-m A.L.S. (French) 3pp. 4to.
6


1842 May 16

Tureaud, Claire
(New Orleans, Louisiana)

Tureaud gives permission to her mulatress, Loyisa, to go to baptize her child Sophie, aged 10 months.

V-4-m A.D.S. (French) 1p. 16mo.
0


1842 May 17

(Chanche), Bishop John Joseph
Natchez, (Mississippi)

To Bishop (Anthony) Blanc
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

(Chanche) received a letter a few days ago from (Baron) de Bacourt, the French Minister in Washington, on the subject of Mr. de Beaumont who stayed some time in New Orleans and with whom Blanc has had some communication. This Beaumont is the Marquis de Bellune under an assumed name. He has a wife and children in France but he has deceived a young woman and brought her to this country. The French Minister's letter requests (Chanche) to try his influence to bring this young woman to a sense of her duty. (Chanche) asks Blanc to let him know what he knows of the subject and where they are living. Blanc is not to forget that (Chanche) wrote some time ago about Father (Augustin) de Angelis and Pascagoula.

V-4-m A.L.S. 3pp. 4to.
5


1842 May 17

Vassel, (Joseph)
(New Orleans, Louisiana)

Receipted bill for $10.50 for postage for the Bishop, Father Rousselon, Mr. Vezian, Father Masquelet, Bishop Odin, Father Timon, Martin, Perché, and Maenhaut.

V-4-m A. Receipt S. (French) 2pp. 12mo.
0


1842 May 17

Walter, W.J., British Consulate
Philadelphia, (Pennsylvania)

To Bishop (Anthony) Blanc
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

Walter introduces the bearer of this letter, Mr. Hellert. He is come to the New World as an engineer to the company formed to construct a canal through the Isthmus of Panama. The labor is to be proceeded with at the opening of the coming winter season. Hellert has come to the States to try and ascertain the views of the public toward the enterprise. Walter gratefully acknowledges Blanc's favor of March 4; he regrets the cause which prevents Blanc from realizing his kind wishes in regard to Walter's undertaking but gratefully accepts the handsome aid Blanc is enabled to afford it. Mrs. Walter desires her respectful regards; she begins to be reconciled to the North and his little ones are becoming stout and hearty. Walter begs Blanc's acceptance of his volume on St. Chrysostom.
(On the address side of the letter is the note, partly in pencil): 340 - Mrs. (C.) Barjac on the levee going down (from?) The presby(tery).
V-4-m A.L.S. 4pp. 4to.
4


1842 May 20

(Blanc), Bishop Ant(hony)
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

To Father (P.J.) Doutrelui(n)gne, (C.M.)
Point Coupée, Louisiana

On leaving Doutrelui(n)gne, (Blanc) promised to write. The Superior told (Blanc) in a letter received yesterday that he had written him at Point(e) Coupée. (Blanc) did not receive it so he does not know the Superior's plans in regard to Doutrelui(n)gne's stay at Point Coupée. (Blanc) thinks he would have written Doutrelui(n)gne again if he wishes him to return to the seminary at once. (Blanc) believes that if there is a real need to prolong his stay, Doutrelui(n)gne could return when he pleases. Doutrelui(n)gne is to ask the trustees to hurry the repairs to the rectory; right after court, (Blanc) will send a priest to occupy it. (Blanc) would like to have word of the results of the case. (The letter is sent by) Homer Bouis(?).

V-4-m A.L.S. (French) 1p. 8vo.
2


1842 May 20

Dubuisson, S.J., Father Stephen L.
Marseilles, (France)

To (Father Stephen Rousselon
New Orleans, Louisiana)

Charged with sending to Father (Vitales) Giles, S.J. at St. Mary's College, Louisville, a package containing about 40 pairs of socks sent by his parents, Dubuisson addresses it to (Rousselon) according to what he was told by Father (James) Vandevelde, S.J. who knows (Rousselon). Captain Odle, who was willing to take them with him, assured Dubuisson that it would not be necessary to pay duty but possibly (Rousselon) would advance the small amount required. Also will (Rousselon) give the attached package to the Superior of the Visitation Convent at Mobile? It contains a brochure published in Rome concerning the conversion of Ratisbonne ; he is sending with it another copy of the brochure for (Rousselon). Dubuisson will not forget having had the advantage of seeing Father (Louis Moni) Mony; he sends his respects. Dubuisson also belongs to the American missionaries; he is detained at Marseilles on the advice of his doctors. The air of the South of France is to aid the cure of a stubborn laryngitis.
V-4-m A.L.S. (French) 3pp. 12mo.
6


1842 May 21

Hillis(?), John H.
Pointe Coupée, (Louisiana)

to Bishop Ant(hony) Blanc
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

After a trial which lasted three days they have brought the affair of the Congregation of St. Francis to a close. The Court has not yet given its decision but Hillis feels confident that Father (Jean Martin) will get judgment in his favor. Hillis argued that as Blanc had the exclusive right of appointing and removing parish priests that the Congregation of St. Francis was incompetent to decide upon the qualifications and could not dispense with Martin's services so long as Blanc did not interfere. By the act of incorporation the revenues should be appropriated to the support of a parish priest and he should have the use of the church property. The latter provision was repealed in 1838 provided the wardens thought proper to dispose of the same differently but until 1841 they never exercised that right. Martin has performed all his duties from 1834 to 1842 and was entitled to $1000 a year. Hillis does not presume that the matter will end that the matter will end here and he will have an opportunity before the session of the superior court to have a conversation with Blanc and Father (Matthew Bernard) Anduze on the subject. Hillis asks Blanc to thank Anduze for the very able opinions that accompany his testimony which was of infinite service to M(artin).

V-4-m A.L.S. 3pp. 4to.
4


1842 May 21

Rousselon, Father E(tienne)
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

Bishop Anthony Blanc informs Father C(onstantine)
Maenhaut, pastor of St. Mary's, that he grants a dispensation from the publication of one bann for the marriage of Hypolite Peralta and Laura Coulon Jumonville.

V-4-m D.S. (Latin) 1p. Folio
4


1842 May 21

Seghers, D.
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

Bishop (Anthony) Blanc gave Seghers today two notes belonging to Father Hercule Brassac both dated May 5, 1837, signed by J(osep)h Mareat Ducros, payable in 5 years to the order of Philippe Marsoudet, endorsed by him and by Rudolph J. Ducros. One of the notes is for 5000 piastres; the other for 500, both initialed by Notary Caire and both protested on May 7, 1842. Seghers will take the necessary action to recover these notes.

V-4-m A.D.S. (French) 1p. 8vo.
6


1842 May 22

(Odin), Bishop John Mary
Galveston, (Texas)

To Bishop A(nthony) Blanc
New Orleans, L(ouisian)a

There is nothing new in Texas affairs since (Odin's) last letter except a rumor that 1200 Mexican's are approaching San Antonio. It is believed to be a false report. He has also just been told that Mr. McMullen, one of their best Catholics of that town has been massacred with his wife and six orphans. He hopes this is also false. They are continuing preparations for an expedition against Mexico but when it will take place they do not know. Misery is at its peak especially in the West. (Odin) has just bought a dwelling at Galveston, a house with four small rooms. On the back of the lot there is a large house which (Odin) is going to turn into a school. Next week his sacristan will have charge of the children; he has already taught there with much success. This property cost $1200 and with it he got chairs, tables, etc. He still sleeps at (Michael B.?) Menard's; his means do not allow him to hire a servant and maintain a house. He discovers new Catholics every day and hopes that little by little they will begin to fulfill their religious duties. Today their little church could not hold all those who wished to assist at Mass. He is having a small sacristy built. He thinks he will limit himself to visiting Houston and Galveston. The number of Catholics in these two towns is considerable. The church at Houston is enclosed and they say he can say Mass there in a few weeks. He sends greetings to Father Rousselon and others at the bishopric.
V-4-m A.L.S. (French) 3pp. 4to.
7


1842 May 22

O'Sullivan, J(ohn) L.
New York, New York

to (Orestes A. Brownson
Boston, Massachusetts)

He has given great reflection to Brownson's letter, and the idea of concentrating their two works into one, runs to more and more favor with him. He would be sincerely glad if he could arrange terms to a mutual satisfaction. He presumes with Brownson that the greater part of the letters subscribers are distinct from his own and that their transfer would involve as an essential condition his accession as a regular contributor to the "Democratic Review" which would be agreeable to O'Sullivan. The condition of a fixed sum must depend on its amount. The space in the "Review" would have an average range of from 15 to 20 pages, the sum of $50 per month. For his subscribers he says a dollar and a half each for all choosing to continue under this arrangement. For articles a minimum of $2.50 per page would be paid, and up to $4.00 if the finances of the work will permit. He asks Brownson to hurry his reply.

I-3-f A.L.S. 1p. 8vo.
2


1842 May 23

Bienvenue, A. Devince
Jefferson Parish, (Louisiana)

Bienvenue gives permission to his mulatress Clara to go to town to be baptized.

V-4-m A.D.S. (French) 1p. 32mo.
0


1842 May 24

Young, Father Joshue M.
Lancaster, Ohio

to Bishop John Baptist Purcell
of Cincinnati, Ohio

The jubilee has been the cause of his delay. He wishes that it had been published so that the congregation at Logan could have gained the indulgences. He can make but one week at Lancaster and one week at Columbus. Sets down some facts about the congregation at Columbus, stressing the fact that they are nearly all Germans. At Lancaster and Logan they are also numerous and the priest sent on either of these missions must know German. Thinks that Father (Joseph J.) O'Mealy will not suit these places and prefers Father (Charles) McCallion. Thinks the latter can learn German but that the former cannot. Also the missions of Fathers Olivetti and McCaffrey at last do not have a majority of Germans. Thinks that McCallion should be given a chance to learn German, also that the seminarians should be made to learn German as a condition for their ordination. Suggests that McCallion be sent with Father Horstman or Tschenhenss for a half year. Mentions also the younger O'Mealy and James Wood. Though his objections to Father O'Mealy are personal he gives a defense of them in detail. Purcell will find at Mt. St. Mary's a German named Mr. Bose who belongs to the diocese. Asks for faculty to bianet [bination]. Asks about possibility of converting Mr. (Thomas) Ewing. Mr. Boyle availed himself of the jubilee. Fathers Juncker, Lamy and N.D. Young were with him that morning.
P.S. Mr. Geraghty arrived that morning pleased with his visit.
II-4-h A.L.S. 3pp. 8vo.
9


1842 May 25

Filicchi, Patrizio
Leghorn, (Italy)

To James Roosevelt Bailey
Rome, (Italy)

Bailey's letter of the 2nd reached Filicchi this morning. Enclosed Bailey will find a few lines for Filicchi is sure his sister will be glad to receive a visit from a relation of their dear friends, the Setons, of whose Father she has still a clear recollection. Filicchi congratulates Bailey for the happy change he has made in his mind about his Faith. Bailey's holy aunt, (Mother Elizabeth Ann Bailey) Seton will assist Bailey in the hard enterprise he so courageously intends to pursue. Filicchi's Father, Mrs. Filicchi and his sister join him in the most heartfelt congratulations. They long to express their feelings viva voce in the visit Bailey promises on his way to Paris.

II-2-n A.L.S. 2pp. 4to.
3


1842 May 26

Pierz, Father Francois
Sau(l)t Ste. Marie, (Michigan)

To Bishop (Peter Paul) Lefevere
Detroit, (Michigan)

Mr. Ord, agent of the savages at Sault, received from the government a new form in which the missions are to give their annual report of the Indian Mission Schools. Pierz took a copy for himself and sends one to the Bishop as head of them (missions and schools). He must present reports of Arbre Croche's, Lacroix's and
Middletown's schools to the agent of Mackinac and of Sault Ste. Marie's school to the agent of Sault. He is disturbed about what he should say in the column about the allotment of missionary funds. He asks whether to leave it blank or give information concerning what he gave the teachers. The new form was caused by the scandalous complaint form Father ( ) Santeli against Father (Francois Vincent) Badin, about which he knew nothing. Furthermore, Santeli persuaded a couple of Indians from Arbre Croche to complain to the agent of Mackinac that Badin did not pay sufficiently to the schools and missionaries. The complaint reached the government. It is true that Badin did not act properly with the agent, causing scandal. Pierz wrote to Father (Andrew) Viszoczky at Grand Traverse and advised him to establish a school in his mission, so that in his report next fall they can show the visible superiority of Catholicism to get a proper share of the $7000 guaranteed by the treaty for the instruction of the savages. Up to now the other religious denominations are reviewing part of this fund, but there are more Catholics among the Indian pupils than in the 4 other denominations. Lefevere should then receive more than half of the fund for the Catholic pupils. Pierz is still at Sault busy with his school of 66 pupils but is leaving tomorrow for Lake Superior. Miss Perrault and her brother Edward will take care of the school. He promised them $100 a year which they wish to be paid quarterly. Pierz did not send the Holy oils to Father (Florimond) Bonduel at Green Bay and Father (Theodore) Van den Broeck, because he heard that Bonduel was not at Green Bay. He left them with Father Santeli at Mackinac. He will send them when Bonduel returns.

III-2-g A.L.S. (French) 3pp. 8vo.
11


1842 May 30

McCaffrey, Father James
Marietta, Ohio

to Bishop John Baptist Purcell
of Cincinnati, Ohio

Sends Purcell the letter of Mr. Simm Archer, whose daughter has married her first cousin, a warm Methodist. The answer rests with Purcell. If Father (Charles) McCallion has been appointed to St. Dominic's at Duck Creek he feels that his obligations in the matter have been discharged. Miss Elen Gallagher, youngest daughter of old Mr. Gallagher of Guernsey persists in her desire to become a nun as Purcell recommended and desires information on the subject from the bishop. While McCaffrey has given all an opportunity to make the jubilee he will be deprived of the privilege unless Purcell extends the time until he can get to some distant pastor. He has not received the holy oils yet. He is making every effort to have the church at Meigs Creek ready for dedication on July 25th, and hopes that Purcell will be able to make his visitation at that time.

II-4-h A.L.S. 2pp. 8vo.
6


1842 Jun 1

Blanchard, Elmer, and Company
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

to Father (Stephen) Rousselon
(New Orleans, Louisiana)

Receipt for $1 for freight from Havre on the ship L'Andelle. B(ertra)nd (?) Drogré (?) signs.

V-4-m A. Receipt S. 1p. 16mo.
2


1842 Jun 3

(Blanc), Ant(hony), Bishop of New Orleans
St. Michael, (Louisiana)

To Father E(tienne) Rousselon
New Orleans, L(ouisian)a

(Blanc) has just received Rousselon's second dispatch through Father (J.M.) Bonniot. He leaves tonight for Iberville. Will Rousselon write to Father (Victor) Jamey to ask him to give a retreat to the children at the Convent at Grand Coteau? The package from Philadelphia contained two baptismal certificates to be called for at the bishopric; if any one comes to claim them Rousselon can tell them that (Blanc) will keep them until he returns to New Orleans. One hears so many bad things about certain banks, and ones they are interested in, that it is good to be entirely in the hands of Providence in order to remain indifferent. Bishop (Michael) Portier writes that he considers Father (Louis) Moni to be gravely ill. Father (Constantine) Maenh(aut)'s self sacrifice will not fulfill their anticipation, (Blanc) fears. Meanwhile Maenhaut's present position, face to face with Rome, does not permit (Blanc) to change anything until something is decreed in his support.
(P.S.) Rousselon is to take care of the enclosed (no enclosure) by excusing (Blanc) to the superior because of his absence; he will write himself. Rousselon is also to ask Maenhaut to read the letter from Cincinnati and to present it to the Mexican Consul telling him the reason for (Blanc) not presenting it himself.

V-4-m A.L.S. (French) 2pp. 4to.
6


1842 Jun 3

Machebeuf, Father J(oseph) P(rojectus)
Sandusky City, (Ohio)

To Bishop John Baptist Purcell
of Cincinnati, Ohio

Machebeuf has not heard from Purcell since he received the letter by Mr. Dickenson of Lower Sandusky. He has been well, since he left Tiffin, although poorly looking. He gives an account of his mission. Against the great amount of drunkenness and blasphemy, the Temperance Society begun by Purcell has gained the most part of the congregation. Like Fathers (Amadeus) Rappe and (Louis) DeGoesbriand being French he did not at first approve of the movement but the majority would compel him to join the Society. He joined on St. Patrick's day with 25 Irishmen, after the High Mass and sermon. The number of members has grown to 162 including some whom the year before were "the very pillars of the taverns." There are no Irish Catholics whom he regards as drunkards. The Germans have not joined, except one who joined with some women. The number of Easter communions is about 150 and he expects more; baptisms 38; marriages 5; deaths 2, one of them a convert who gave him much consolation. The walls of the Church are entirely finished and next week they will give the contract for the reef. While he writes the mason is beginning his house of the stone left from the church. Mr. Mills has given 2 acres near the church for a graveyard. Machebeuf asks if it is necessary to move the Catholics from the other cemetery and if he has power to bless the new one. As to Lower Sandusky he is at a loss to know what to do since they are so much divided concerning the location of the church. He has asked them only for the $40.00 he gave them but can get nothing. The episcopalian minister refused to go for less than $700 while his congregation is seated at his own expense. However, he goes there regularly. He sends regards to the priests at Cincinnati.
II-4-h A.L.S. 3pp. 8vo.
5


1842 Jun 5

Purcell, (Bishop) J(ohn) B(aptist)
(Cincinnati), (Ohio)

To Miss Theresa A. Bertrand
( )

Mr. Hatch has favored Purcell with Miss Bertrand's kind letter which he was pleased to receive. He is glad to learn that the health of the family has improved especially that of Mr. Bertrand, who had been so delicate. He is truly distressed to learn of fire by which the Bertrand's sustained so heavy a loss. God tries His elect thus. They will soon see the light of His countenance in Holy Joy. He feels greatly the fact that they are deprived of the consolations of religion and knows by his own experience how difficult it must be for Bishop (Peter Paul) Lefev(e)re or any other bishop to find enough men to meet the needs of increasing Congregations. Miss Bertrand should write Bishop Lefevere of her desolate condition without Mass on Sunday and tell him she writes on Purcell's advice. He exhorts her to remain faithful like Tobias until services are restored. Purcell sends sincere respects to her brother, sister, and also her aged Father, the honor of whose acquaintance he does not have. She should say her prayers morn, noon, and night, read a devout book for a quarter of an hour every day, and teach some destitute children the catechism and the love of God.
III-2-g A.L.S. 2pp. 8vo.
3


1842 Jun 5

Ryan, Father Jam(e)s (?)
Kanturk, (Cork, Ireland)

To (Father Bonaventure Armengol?
Assumption, Louisiana?)

The bearer, Jeremiah Moynihan, of Kanturk, begs to be introduced in order to be received into the seminary. His moral conduct is irreproachable and (Armengol?) Will be able to judge of his literary acquirements. Ryan sends respects to Mr. Forbes.
V-4-m A.L.S. 1p. 4to.
3


1842 Jun 6

(Chanche), John Joseph, Bishop of Natchez
Natchez, Mississippi

to Bishop John Baptist Purcell
of Cincinnati, Ohio

Chanche owes a bill of $99 to Mitchell and Moore of Cincinnati. He proposes to have Purcell pay the bill drawing on M. L'Homme of Baltimore for the amount. Foley was condemned to five years in the penitentiary. Chanche went to Vicksburg and made inquiries about Frances I. Jameson. He found that she was working with people who would not let her go to the Catholic church. He has asked Father O'Reilly to see about her. The church there is progressing but he does not know where he can get money to pay for it because the currency there is in a deplorable condition. Asks about two packages mentioned formerly.

II-4-h A.L.S. 2pp. 8vo.
5


1842 Jun 8

(Lewis, Dixon H.)
Washington, D.C.

To Orestes A. Brownson
Boston, Massachusetts

He is glad to hear that he is in favor of their friend (John C.) Calhoun for President, who is probably the only one who can reform and bring back their government to the old Republican position. He has many active and intelligent friends everywhere, but there is a strange universal fear that he is unpopular and cannot be nominated. This may result from his late weak position with the Democratic Party. People fail to realize that what inclines them to Mr. Calhoun also inclines thousands of others. They think that because Mr. (Martin) V(an) Buren is running, no one need oppose him. Their time to move is at hand but they must do so cautiously and with kindness to Mr. V(an) Buren. A good article from The Northern Press would be the thing. He will send Brownson a sort of outline for him to finish up. And he now sends one in a Pennsylvania paper which should be reprinted in one of the Democratic papers with a short notice suggesting a Northern nominee for vice-president. Lewis thinks (Levi) Woodbury would best suit Brownson's people. He suggests that the article connect Woodbury's name with Mr. Calhoun's. The source of the article must be kept concealed, and he asks Brownson to keep these views confidential.

I-3-f Signature cut out 3.. 8vo.
5


1842 Jun 8

O'Sullivan, J(ohn) L.
New York, (New York)

To O(restes) A. Brownson
Boston, Massachusetts

Under his new arrangement with the Messrs. Langley, he has to turn over to Mr. Langley the negotiation with Mr. (Benjamin H.) Green about the purchase of his list (of subscribers). Mr. Langley does not seem inclined towards Green's offer of $200 for the whole number of 500. O'Sullivan himself, though, would agree, were he in a position to do anything about it. Mr. Langley will correspond with Mr. Green and they probably will come to an agreement. As to his own relations and Brownson's, he is agreeable to the two years. Payment will be monthly, punctual and positive. He can give no further assurance than the reputed reliability of his publishers and the undoubted ability of the "Democratic Review." He hopes Brownson may be able to write for the July number but certainly for the August number. He hopes soon to meet Brownson in Boston.

I-3-f A.L.S. 2pp. 8vo.
3


1842 Jun 9

Ilsley, John H.
Donaldsonville, (Louisiana)

To Bishop (Anthony) Blanc
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

Since addressing Blanc on the subject of the suit of Father (Jean) Martin versus the Congregation of St. Francis of Pointe Coupée, judgement has been rendered in Martin's favor for the use of $6700. The wardens were astonished, having always considered Martin's claims unfounded. Ilsley trusts that his efforts will eventually be crowned with success should the wardens appeal.

V-4-m A.L.S. 2pp. 4to.
3


1842 Jun 9

Wood, James Frederick
Rome, Italy

to Bishop John Baptist Purcell
of Cincinnati, Ohio

Expresses his deep gratitude to Bishop Purcell for the aid he has given to his mother and sister. He has had some scruples about his obligations to leave the seminary and take care of them and has written to his mother to represent her condition to the bishop who is to decide for him. He speaks of the recent conversation of Mr. James Hayley of New York who intends to study for the priesthood. Bishop (Joseph) Rosati has returned from his mission to Haiti. He describes the conditions there as bad but has the promise of the President to assist in the reformation of the clergy and the people. The Pope has expressed himself as greatly pleased with the legation. There are many Spanish priests in Rome but they are being absorbed by the various missions. He speaks of Mrs. Gondolf's retirement from the world. Father (John) Grassi will cease to be Rector of the Propaganda to be coadjutor general of the Jesuits. The King of Bavaria, who is in Rome, visited them. Has heard of the death of Bishop England.

II-4-h A.L.S. 4pp. 8vo.
5


1842 Jun 10

(Channing, William E.)
Providence, (Rhode Island)

To O(restes) A. Brownson
Boston, Massachusetts

He has just read Brownson's letter twice, and has derived much pleasure and edification from it. The view set forth seems to him striking and satisfactory. He has always received the idea that in Jesus an absolutely divine life is exhibited in connection with human nature, and that from Him the blood of atonement flows into the human nature. He has never seen it stated philosophically as Brownson has sought to do. He is much interested in the philosophy in the letter, but from lack of acquaintance with (Pierre) Leroux's work, does not sufficiently apprehend enough to make him thank Brownson for the pleasure and profit the letter affords. The subject is too vast for adequate treatment in one pamphlet, for some passages make Brownson appear as a Universalist. He congratulates Brownson for finding new light and hopes that he will leave his impress upon his new plans of action. Brownson was created to do better than scatter random shot.
I-3-f (Signature cut out) 4pp. 8vo.
3


1842 Jun 12

(Blanc), Ant(hony), Bishop of New Orleans
Louisville, (Kentucky)

To Father E(tienne) Rousselon
New Orleans, L(ouisian)a

(Blanc) arrived this morning with Bishop (John Mary) Odin. Bishop (Celestin) de la Hailandière and Father (John) Boullier, (C.M.). Odin already had a heavy cold yesterday; nevertheless he persisted in setting out again today for Cape Girardeau where the (Lazarists) were to have a meeting on the 15th. (Blanc) will leave tomorrow with the Bishop of Vincennes; he will remain with him until next Sunday and then set out for St. Louis where he will stay until the 25th or 26th. Then he will come to New Orleans. He has just heard of the new profanation of the church at Convent. They stopped at Cincinnati only to say Mass yesterday. At Louisville unfortunately he did not see Bishop (Benedict Joseph) Flaget who is in the interior of his diocese where he will probably spend all summer dividing his time among his different Communities.

V-4-m A.L.S. (French) 2pp. 4to.
7


1842 Jun 12

L(ynch), Anne C.
Providence, (Rhode Island)

To O(restes) A. Brownson
Boston, Massachusetts

She has been absent from town for three weeks and is taking this first opportunity to answer his last letter which found her going away. She visited New York, Hudson and Philadelphia. At the latter city she spent ten days very delightfully. She has only been living outwardly which she thinks if good occasionally for those who get too subjective. Sometimes she has almost grown wild from looking at a familiar object which began to assume fantastic appearances. She witnessed some astonishing experiments in phreno-magnetism while in Philadelphia. She saw Mr. Neale and also Brownson's friend Mr. Earle. She saw several Catholic priests and was quite pleased with them. She says that she is sorry that Brownson regarded her opinion of metaphysics as implied censure. She had only been writing her thoughts random. She has heard enthusiastic accounts of his preaching and she hopes to hear him when she visits Boston. She has heard, too, that Brownson has published a letter to Dr. Channing, but she hasn't had an opportunity to see it.

I-3-f A.L.S. 3pp. 8vo.
2


1842 Jun 12

Richards, C.
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

Permission given to his Negress Matilde to have her child baptized. (In another handwriting on this note): Marie, born last October; Franc(ois?) Lavigne Jamey, Victoria Jamey.

V-4-m A.D.S. (French) 1p. 32mo.
2


1842 Jun 13

O(restes) A. Brownson
Boston, Massachusetts

(To the editors of the "Intelligencer")

He asks them to insert in the "Intelligencer" a brief reply to the statements made concerning him by Mr. Arnold. (Thomas D.) Arnold put too much faith in statements made against him by partisan prints. The statements in the article are gross perversions of his essay on the laboring classes, and serve to misrepresent him to readers who are unacquainted with his habits of thought and expression. Other statements come from sources entitled to so little credit that he could not reply directly without derogating his own self respect. When, in his 1840 (Boston Quarterly) "Review," he gave his defenses against those charges, they received less notoriety than the charges, since little political capital could be made from the reply. He yields to none in the firmness of his faith in the Gospel of our Lord and in his devotion to social order and well-being. To refute the charges he quotes part of his other reply, stating his belief in the inspiration of the Old and the New Testament, Christian miracles, Friendship, Trinity, Atonement, rewards and punishments. He thinks any man who believes in these doctrines should at least be spared the charge of infidelity.
I-3-f A.D.S. 3pp. 8vo.
3


1842 Jun 15

Bonduel, F(lorimond) I.
(Green Bay, Wisconsin)

To Bishop P(eter Paul) Lefevere of Zela
(Detroit, Michigan)

Bonduel paid $2500 from his personal funds for the construction of the church, presbytery and school at Pointe S(ain)t Ignace and the school at Mackinac. The whole cost $3500. Bishop Résé gave three hundred piastres of this amount, one hundred in materials and two hundred in cash. The rest was donated by subscription, without including the shares of the church, the cemetery, and the school of Point S(ain)t Ignace which were given free by Louizon Martin and his wife of Point S(ain)t Ignace. The presbytery of Mackinac was built through the generosity of Monsieur Samuel Abbott of that place, the church, by subscription at various times. Bonduel certifies that this memorandum of the temporal state of the parish of Mackinac and Pointe S(ain)t Ignace has been given to the best of his conscience.

III-2-g A.L.S. (French) 1p. 8vo.
1


1842 Jun 15

Gaux and Company
(New Orleans, Louisiana)

(Bishop Anthony Blanc)
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

Receipted bill for $12 for 100 circular letters.

V-4-m A. Receipt S. (French) 2pp. 12mo.
1


1842 Jun 15

McCaffrey, Father James
Marietta, Ohio

to Bishop John Baptist Purcell
of Cincinnati, Ohio

He thanks Purcell for his letter of the third, and for the advice he sent him. Is sorry that Purcell cannot attend the dedication of the church at Meigs Creek but desires to avail himself of Purcell's permission to call any other priest to invite Father Edward Purcell to attend. As to the other $50 from Purcell he suggests that Purcell send it to him as he is indebted to strange workmen for $30 or $40 and does not have other means of paying them. He has not received the oils. P.S. He was the one who gave Judge Hayward the paper containing the article about Father (Michael E.) Olivetti. He understands that Father Olivetti intends to give a Temperance lecture at McConnellsville July 4, but he regards it as imprudent.

II-4-h A.L.S. 2pp. 8vo.
6


1842 Jun 16

Lewis, Dixon H.
Washington, D.C.

To O(restes) A. Brownson
Boston, Massachusetts

He wonders why he received no information from Brownson with regard to the article to be republished in some Democratic paper proposing (Levi) Woodbury as Vice President. He agrees with Brownson that (Silas) Wright is the stronger man, but he is too much complicated with Van Buren. He thinks that they should go for (John C.) Calhoun for a single term and choose a vice president who will be no man of straw. In the meantime, Brownson can prepare the article which may be adapted to the whole Union, and will speak the feelings of the Democracy of the North and South. Then he proposes that he do an article on Calhoun himself, pointing out, with all kindness to (Martin) V(an) Buren, that the latter has been unfortunate in his agents and hasn't the required administrative talent. He says to urge the injustice of running Van Buren for a third term. Expenses of government must be diminished; further the South is the object of fanatical attack and tariff cupidity. Calhoun is, himself, in favor of the single term, and it should be pointed out that Calhoun has the required administrative talent, and that he is also a reformer. Lewis indicates the importance of waking up the quiescent people that presume that Van Buren will run as a matter of course. Calhoun's friends have been too long silent. P.S. He advises that it would be best if Brownson could conceal, even from the editor, his part in the matter; and if he could publish the article in Maine or New Hampshire.

I-3-f A.L.S. pp.. 8vo.
5


1842 Jun 16

McNamee, Father Joseph
Fort Ball, Ohio

to Bishop John Baptist Purcell
of Cincinnati, Ohio

He thanks Purcell that the jubilee has been extended, so as to allow others to take part in it. Gives the number of English and German communicants in Tiffin, McCuthenville, St. Boniface, Bloom Township near Attica, through Father Francis X Tschenhenss. Speaks of the more noted converts in these places by name. Because of his health he has not visited Maumee, or Toledo, but asks that the money collected by Father Amadeus Rappe be taken to place on the debt at Maumee. Speaks of the reason why he could not pay the debts when he was there and in Toledo. Speaks of the result of the troubles started by Father (William) Pisbach and of the trouble among the German Catholics in his neighborhood. Father Alexander, the superior of the Redemptorists, is now at Norwalk and will remain some months. Asks if he can invite Father Peter McLaughlin to assist him. Mrs. McLaughlin better; Margaret Hanley is the same.
II-4-h A.L.S. 3pp. 8vo.

(Father Alexander is Alexander Kctivkovicz)
16


1842 Jun 19

Moni, Father L(ouis)
Mobile, (Alabama)

To Bishop Ant(hony) Blanc
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

His illness is lasting longer than he thought and not knowing when he will be able to again take over the care of his parish, Moni notifies Blanc that he confides everything to Father (Matthew Bernard) Anduze authorizing him to act in his name. He asks Blanc not only to approve his choice but even to persuade Anduze to take this new assignment.

V-4-m A.L.S. (French) 2pp. 4to.
2


1842 Jun 24

Lamy, Father John
Newark, Ohio

to Bishop John Baptist Purcell
of Cincinnati, Ohio

Father Juncker has informed Purcell that they had commenced the church in Newark. Most of the timbers came from the church in Zanesville. The congregation there is increasing, and Father Lamy visits them every fourth Sunday. He has had to find a new lodging place but the congregation is not able to build him a house. He has a plan to let one of the parishioners build a house on the church lot with a room for him on suitable terms. The church at Mt. Vernon is not enclosed. Because of the few Catholics the burden rests on Messrs. Colopy, Morton and Brophy. He spends half of his time in Danville. He has done very little to the church but the congregation is rapidly increasing by new families, conversions, etc. Has some difficulty making the people give towards his support and asks Purcell if he can refuse the Sacraments to those that refuse. His circumstances are not food as he has had to borrow from Miss Brent. He asks Purcell to give Julius (Brent) money for his passage home. Lamy asks Purcell what to do about a Catholic girl who insists on marrying an unbaptized man who has lost his moral character. Should he let them go to the squire or marry them himself.

II-4-h A.L.S. 3pp. 8vo.
5


1842 Jun 25

Courbet, F(ranco)is(?)
(St. Martinville, Louisiana)

To Bishop (Anthony Blanc
New Orleans, Louisiana)

Courbet last year was forced to leave the city because of the yellow fever before the public schools had appointed their teachers. He came to Attakapas but his intention always was to ask the
administrators of the Catholic Asylum for an appointment as a teacher. If the administration accedes to his request, he will bring 500 books, globes, maps, etc.

V-4-m A.L.S. (French) 1p. 4to.
1


1842 Jun 26

(Portier), Bishop Michael
Mobile, (Alabama)

To Bishop A(nthony) Blanc or Father (Stephen) Rousselon New Orleans, (Louisiana)

(Portier) was leaving yesterday for Pensacola when they told him that Father (Louis) Moni was dying. (Portier) had to put off his trip until Tuesday although they were expecting him for Confirmation and to open the Jubilee. He found Moni very weak and very resigned. The doctor had scarcely left when Moni had a severe hemorrhage. The doctor says he cannot live more than a week. (Portier) asks Blanc to come to see Moni and replace (Portier) during his enforced absence.
V-4-m A.L.S. (French) 2pp. 4to.
4


1842 Jun 26

Rappe, Father Amadus Louis
Toledo, Ohio

to Bishop John Baptist Purcell
of Cincinnati, Ohio

The hope of seeing Purcell in Toledo and Maumee has delayed the writing of this letter. Purcell should know where his presence is most useful. The church at Toledo has not begun and Rappe hopes to avoid the trouble of building by buying the Presbyterian church which has been sold by the sheriff to a private person. He has a school house already. Asks Purcell to authorize the purchase. At a small town, Manhattan, where a railroad is to be built, and where the Maumee River and the new Indiana Canal pass, are about 50 French families who want a church. The railroad offers Rappe 16 lots for a church house, graveyard and garden, and he asks Purcell about the offer. Rappe speaks of the good results he has achieved by his missions around Toledo and Maumee and speaks of his prospects. He asks Purcell if he is to remain there since Purcell told him that he was not fixed. His consolations have been more than his pain but he is willing to leave if Purcell should tell him to go.

II-4-h A.L.S. 3pp. 8vo.
5


1842 Jun 28

Baraga, Father Frederick
Lapointe, (Wisconsin)

To Bishop Peter Paul Lefevere
Detroit, (Michigan)

Baraga read with great emotion the Pastoral Letter of the Bishop. He is anxious to meet him and receive his episcopal blessing, but as he cannot leave his mission, he begs the Bishop to give him the blessing in spirit when he reads these lines. Baraga also declares with God as a witness that he will render obedience to the Bishop in everything pertaining to his holy office. He thinks that obedience is the soul of spiritual life. Then Baraga cites in Latin 7 phrases about the virtue of obedience. He has always wanted to belong to a religious order because of his love for obedience, but something always prevented him from doing so. Now he asks the Bishop to put him under obedience so he will have the merits of obedience in everything he does as a missionary. Concerning his needs, he asks only to receive the money his parents or his good friends from Europe will send him.

III-2-g A.L.S. (France, Latin) 3pp.
1


1842 Jun 29

O'Sullivan, J(ohn) L.
New York, (New York)

To O(restes) A. Brownson
Boston, Mass(achusetts)

Brownson's letter surprises him in holding up the arrangement on the grounds of demanding greater security, and the absence of a definite settlement of the transfer of his subscription list. He believed that Brownson had agreed perfectly in his first letter. It was on Brownson's say-so that he went ahead and made public declaration of Brownson's merger with the "Democratic Review." He discussed the business between their publishers in regard to the lists of subscriptions. With regard to the certainty of Brownson's pay he can say that since he has been in charge and in connection with Messr. Langley, there never has been any want of punctuality on that score. If Brownson had before stated that he wanted security in the form of a legal contract, he would have let it be so. But since Brownson questions his word, he shall not resort to a lower form of security now. He feels that it shall not be his fault if arrangements are entirely dropped. Should they be, he can easily announce to the public that the arrangements were premature and founded on a misunderstanding. No inkling of a want of good temper and kindness. He shall publish such an announcement immediately upon hearing from Brownson, if such is the latter's desire.
I-3-f A.L.S. 3PP. 8VO.
2


1842 Jun 29

(Purcell), J(ohn) B(aptist), B(isho)p of Cin(cinnati) Cin(cinnati, Ohio)

To (Bishop Peter Paul Lefevre)
(Detroit, Michigan)

Happy Feast day" Judge ( ) Hall is anxiously looking for an answer to Purcell's letter to Father (Martin) Kundig about the Indian Augustine (Hamelin). Hall wants details of his character, conduct and present pursuits. Purcell is giving up hope of having Bishop (Benedict J.) Flaget (of Louisville) for the dedication of the new German church next Sunday. (Note in Lefevere's hand answered July 19).

III-2-g A.L.S. 1p. 8vo.
5


1842 Jul 1

Baraga, (Father) Frederick
La Pointe (Wisconsin)

to Bishop Peter Paul Lefevere
of Detroit, Michigan

Father Baraga asks the Bishop's advice in two things: (1) He asks about Canadians or half-breed Catholics, who spend the winter in their own territory but the summer in La pointe and there live together with women without being married. He asks what he should do if they do not listen to any of his exhortations either to be married in church or to separate. He had forbidden them to go to church to make them see the horror of their crimes. But on the other hand that deprives them of the sermons which they need so much. It might be enough to keep the sacraments from them until they repent and to continue to exhort them. He hopes the bishop will advise him soon. (2) Baraga wants a mission school, but as he is all alone and his congregation rather large and spread out, he himself cannot conduct school at the same time. To try and do both would result in a neglect of his mission, his spiritual life, and also the school. Twice he had attempted to conduct a school (in La pointe): first, in 1837, but a month later his Indians complained that he neglected them too much; the second time, last winter. The interruptions were quite frequent and after a month and a half, he had to leave La pointe altogether to go on a mission trip to Fond du Lac in the middle of the winter. When he had returned, Lent began and his missionary duties increased. Again he had to stop teaching and he has not tried again. He begs the Bishop to consider their two problems carefully for he is willing to do whatever he is told. There are two Presbyterian schools in La pointe one for boys, one for girls. Almost all the Catholic children go there. They are taught to read and write in English and Indian, but it has been agreed that no mention of religion may be made, otherwise Baraga would take the children out of school immediately.

III-2-g A.L.S. (French) 3pp.
2


1842 Jul 2

Montgomery, Father Charles P.
Zanesville, Ohio

to Bishop John Baptist Purcell
of Cincinnati, Ohio

Montgomery writes this letter at the request of James Kinsley who is doing the stone work on the new church there. Mr. Kinsley has received a bill from the Jesuits at Cincinnati for his son to the amount of $100. He asks that Purcell remit the sum and that the amount paid be credited for Purcell's subscription to the church. The workmen are getting along well and will have the church under roof this fall.
II-4-h A.L.S. 1p. 8vo.
2


1842 Jul 4

(Odin), Bishop John Mary
Galveston, (Texas)

to Bishop A(nthony) Blanc
New Orleans, L(ouisian)a

(Odin) received Blanc's letter from New York and the enclosed papers. The members of the Texan Congress met at Houston the 27th of last month. The militia is organizing but it is probable that there will be no serious move. The treasurer does not have a sou and the president senses the absurdity of undertaking a war without resources. Also, spirits are calmer and those who seemed strongest for invading Mexico are beginning to see it would be foolhardy. The volunteers from the United States are a scourge for the country. In order to live they pillage. Five companies have just been withdrawn and sent to Corpus Christi. Those at Corpus Christi now have ruined the people and when there is nothing more to take they desert. Since (Odin) is installed in his little house he is very quiet. Sundays there is always quite a crown in their little chapel. Many Protestants attend. Most of the Catholics have entirely forgotten their religion. The church at Houston will be enclosed this week. (Odin) will go there in 8 or 10 days. It cost $1050 and (Odin) is to furnish $900. He hopes not to need the money he left with Blanc until next year; he still has $200. Postal service is interrupted in a great part of the country and he seldom has news of priests in the West. He has written Father (Eudald) Estany, (C.M.) to join Father (Michel) Calvo, (C.M.) at San Antonio. (Odin) asks to be remembered to Father Rousselon and all at the bishop's house.
V-4-m A.L.S. (French) 4pp. 4to.
5


1842 Jul 5

Calongne, Fr(ancoi)s
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

Calongne gives permission to his servant Isabel to have her child baptized; he was born October 22, 1841. (The name) Paul (is written on the note).

V-4-m A.D.S. (French) 1p. 32mo.
0


1842 Jul 5

O'Sullivan, J(ohn) L.
New York, (New York)

To O(restes) A. Brownson
Boston, Mass(achusetts)

Brownson's publisher has, by his suspiciousness, cast much entanglement over a simple matter. It is a piece of rudeness that Mr. (Benjamin H.) Green should contradict his (Sullivan's)
announcement. He was prepared to accept Mr. Green's proposition if no other mutually satisfactory arrangement could be made. It would have been time enough for the contradiction of his announcement by Mr. Green when he had ascertained that it would not go into effect. It seems that Mr. Green wants to turn out an October issue of the "Quarterly." Therefore O'Sullivan says, his manuscript of it must not take effect until October. He hopes that when they have fairly entered in the thing that they will get along better than they have up to this point. If Brownson has leisure to write he would be glad to accept the article at $3 a page. He has reserved space for an article of Brownson's in the August number. He requests that Brownson notify him whether or not he can submit the article. He says that Messrs. Langley have agreed to pay Green $200 for the subscription list, so he presumes it will settle the whole matter.

I-3-f A.L.S. 3pp. 8vo.
2


1842 Jul 6

Delanne Brothers
(New Orleans, Louisiana)

Receipted bill for $15 for making a sash fastening for the door of the church, the work approved by J.N. de Pouilly.

V-4-m A. Bill S. (French) 1p. 32mo.
1


1842 Jul 6

Delle Piane, Richard
Leghorn, (Italy)

To Bishop (Anthony Blanc)
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

Delle Piane is grateful to (Blanc) for the news of his son, from whom he has received letters. Delle Piane would like to know who was the first to help him on his arrival in Baton Rouge and to whom (Blanc) applied for the news. He is convinced that Blanc is that man.
V-4-m A.L.S. (French) 1p. 4to.
1


1842 Jul 7

Kundig, (Father) Martin
Milwaukee, (Wisconsin Territory)

to Bishop P(eter) P(aul) Lefevere
Detroit, Michigan

The work is begun and is satisfactory though the congregation is very much divided and lukewarm: the Irish are divided among themselves and opposed to the French; the French despise the Irish; the Germans are like a flock who have had no pastor. With God's help Kundig hopes to see a change before two months have elapsed. The Sixpence Society is established. Kundig visited Furlong's Settlement to make arrangements according to Lefevere's request. The best land of the country is in Catholic hands; within ten miles are about two hundred zealous and pious families. They disagree about the location for the church to be erected. If Lefevere finds it possible to leave him in Milwaukee, Kundig will be ready in about eight or ten weeks to make Father (Thomas) Mor(r)is(se)y a useful co-laborer in Wisconsin. The whole country is Catholic; one priest cannot hold out an Irishman can do little good in Milwaukee if left alone; but if Kundig is left there, or if Lefevere sends his countryman with Morrissey, a great deal can be done with God's assistance. Kundig acknowledges the will of God in Lefevere's orders. He is just as happy in the midst of woods as in cities. P.S. Should Kundig be allowed to remain, Lefevere is to have Miss Heffernan pack his belongings and send them in care of M. Juneau, Milwaukee. Last Sunday they had in their church new benches, a new sacristy, a place for the singers, and a new altar. (Note by Lefevere answered July 18).
6


1842 Jul 9

McCaffrey, Father James
Marietta, Ohio

to Bishop John Baptist Purcell
of Cincinnati, Ohio

At the request of Mr. John McCune, McCaffrey writes to Purcell to ask him to use his influence with Mr. Dickenson one of the members of the Ohio Board of Public Works. Mr. McCune is sure of Purcell's influence over Mr. Dickenson and since he is friendly to one member of the board, if Purcell can influence another a majority will be on h is side. He wants to see that his contract with the state of Ohio is fulfilled, but there is a prejudice working among the public against the Irish contractors and especially the Catholic ones in the Muskingum improvement. McCune would not ask anything unbecoming Purcell's station but feels that Purcell's action will save him the expense of a court action, provided Purcell use his influence before the meeting of the State Legislature, on July 25. McCaffrey has written to Father Edward Purcell, asking him to assist at the blessing of the Meigs Creek church July 24, and hopes to receive a favorable answer.
II-4-h A.L.S. 2pp. 8vo.
6


1842 Jul 11

Dubord, A.
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

Permission for his mulatress Allen to baptize her children.
V-4-m A.D.S. (French) 1p. 32mo.
0


1842 Jul 11

Freeman, W(illia)m C.
New York, (New York)

To O(restes) A. Brownson
Boston, Massachusetts

He writes to Brownson for advice. He is 21 yrs. old and has been studying law with McVean and Reynolds for the last two years. A great change has now come over his mind and he has determined to enter the ministry, after reading many articles by Brownson. His parents are poor and he doesn't know whether he should risk debt by entering a Theological Seminary or by working two or three hours on a farm help support himself and try to find some kind minister to study under. He feels that Brownson is well qualified to advise along these lines.
I-3-f A.L.S. 2pp. 8vo.
1


1842 Jul 12

(Chanche), Bishop John Joseph
Natchez, (Mississippi)

To Bishop (Anthony) Blanc
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

(Chanche) did not answer Blanc's two last letters because he thought Blanc would be absent from New Orleans for some time. Both letters contained matters of great importance. (Chanche) wishes it were possible to visit Blanc to exchange ideas with him. (Chanche) is sorry to hear of Father (Louis) Moni's ill health. It may prove a decided advantage; (Chanche) hopes it will be long before Blanc appoints another curé. Blanc will have an opportunity to put into execution his plan of getting two good priests from France who will take charge of the congregation under Blanc's direction. (Chanche) is glad that Father (Constantine) Maenhaut was nominated for Santo Domingo but still more glad the he declined. The Bishop of Santo Domingo ought to be a member of some Society who would go to his assistance. (Chanche) wonders that Bishop (Joseph) Rosati did not see that; Rosati is getting too old for business. (Chanche) has written to Bishop (Michael) Portier about the money which Blanc had asked him to pay to (Chanche) but he has not yet received an answer. He would like to draw that money now. The church is going on and there is no possibility of getting one cent from anybody. After receiving Blanc's permission (Chanche) wrote to Father (Augustin) de Angelis that he might go to Pascagoula and build a church but the property must be deeded to (Chanche) and he must approve the plan of the church. (Chanche) has been making a bold push for Jefferson College, about five miles from Natchez. At the first meeting 12 out of 17 were in (Chanche's) favor. At the last meeting, the governors not being present, no decision was taken. Getting the College will prove of great advantage. Even if he does not succeed the mere application for the College has caused so much talk that the Catholics will be known advantageously.
(P.S.) Have Mr. and Mrs. De Beaumont left for New Orleans? What is Mrs. Waggaman doing? Blanc is to tell her that (Chanche) is very uneasy about her affairs. (On the address side of the letter) "Kindness of Father O'Reily."

V-4-m A.L.S. 4pp. 4to.
10


1842 Jul 12

Merrick, John M.
Walpole, (New Hampshire)

To (Orestes A.) Brownson

In Brownson's Review of (Pierre) Leroux, Merrick came to an interesting subject which he wishes Brownson to develop more. He refers to Myths. Mythology is a subject about which there is great ignorance. He wants to know how Myths are distinguishable from Fable and Parable. Whether they do not belong to pre-historical periods, and therefore whether they can find their way into Christianity, which commenced under precisely ascertained historical relations? Admitting a basis of fact for Christianity where were the eye witnesses when the synoptics were writing?

I-3-f A.L.S. pp.. 8vo.
2


1842 Jul 12

Tschenhenss, C.SS.R., Father Francis X.
Danville, Ohio

to Bishop John Baptist Purcell
of Cincinnati, Ohio

He writes to tell Purcell the news. Father Alexander Czvitkovicz, C.SS.R. superior of the Redemptorists was at Norwalk from June 22, until July 27, when he hurried back to Baltimore where he is erecting a church. The superior edified all and sang high Mass and preached three times. He also promised that the Norwalk congregation would not be destitute again, promising to send another priest and two lay brothers. The priest is Father M. Allig from Pittsburgh formerly at Freuberg. He is a pious and zealous man and Tschenhenss asks for his authorization to solemnize marriages. After the harvest time he and Father Allig intend to make a prolonged visit to all the German congregations in the neighborhood to give the people the benefit of the prolonged jubilee, staying at each place. There in Father Lamy's congregation he has held services in poor places and has 80 to Holy Communion. Over the Easter time he had over 1400 communicants among the Germans. The schismatics continue despite the
opportunities for reunion, and Father (Joseph) Freygang has been condemned by the court to pay $100 and to restore the name of Marie Hoettel. At Richland peace reigns. The deed has been changed but is still under the name of some of the trustees. At Tiffin the spiritual and temporal affairs are going badly. The Germans seem to suffer much. He will try to attend them once every month.

II-4-h A.L.S. 2pp. 8vo.
9


1842 Jul 14

Heyden, Father Thomas
Bedford, (Pennsylvania)

To Francis P. McFarland, Mt. St. Mary's
Emmittsburgh, M(arylan)d

Heyden presented McFarland's communication to Bishop (Francis Patrick Kenrick) and the Bishop told him to tell McFarland that in consequence of his connections with Mt. St. Mary's he felt delicacy in encouraging him to withdraw from there. But should he be honorably released and if there is a vacant place at St. Charles Seminary, McFarland has his approbation to apply for admission. Heyden would have answered sooner but he had to go with the Bishop. He sends his regards to Father McCaffrey and Brother and Mr. Clark.
I-1-a A.L.S. 1p. 4to.
2


1842 Jul 14

Jesse, A( ) de, President
(Lyons, France)

To Bishop (Peter Paul) Lefebvere (Lefevere)
(Detroit, Michigan)

The Council of the Association of the Propagation informs Lefevere that the Paris Council is in charge this year of sending him the allocation granted by the two councils for 1842 to the diocese of Detroit. The treasurer will arrange with him about the manner and periods of payment. The Council sends Lefevere a copy of the customary list of demands for annual information requesting him to fill out its columns as well as possible and return it. Lefevere should send this list as well as other information of any kind so as to reach the Council of Lyons before May 1 when it begins to make the allotments. The Council asks also for correspondence Lefevere may consider suitable to be inserted in the Annals. Lefevere knows how the interest in the collection compiled and printed at Lyons furnishes a foundation for the Propagation of the Faith. The Council hopes he will not refuse.
P.S. The amount of the allocation granted the Detroit diocese for the current year proves the interest with which the Council received the letter he sent them February 15 last. The future would have gained greater importance for Lefevere if he could realize as the council members do how inadequate are their resources to meet all the needs from all sides for establishing more missions and for the development of Dioceses and institutions. Jesse asks Lefevere to join him in prayer for the success of the work and an increasing ability to support missions.
III-2-g L.S. (French) 2pp. 8vo.
1


1842 July 14

Lambert ( ), for the President
(Paris, France)

To Bishop (Peter Paul Lefevere)
(Detroit, Michigan)

Lambert writing for the President informs Lefevere that the two councils of the Association of the Propagation, of Paris and Lyons, have allotted the diocese of Detroit 53.200 francs for the fiscal year 1842. If Lefevere compares this sum to the allotments of other dioceses for same period he will realize that the councils have taken well into consideration the needs of the Detroit diocese. It is the largest but one of this year's allocations to single diocese. The council has no need to remind Lefevere that the two councils especially the Parisian want as much information as possible on the state of missions. The council will be happy to receive reports on the needs and progress of Religion in a country where, though there is much to do, the presence and zeal of a bishop with whom the Council was familiar will open an era of regeneration. Countersigned by G. Choiselat Gallien as treasurer.
III-2-g L.S. (French) 2pp. 8vo.
1


1842 Jul 15

Kundig, (Father) Martin
Milwaukee, (Wisconsin Territory)

to Bishop Peter Paul Lefevere
Detroit, Michigan

He excuses himself for not writing sooner. Before leaving Detroit, Kundig engaged Doctor (Louis) Cavalli to make a settlement with Michigan bank if possible. Cavalli now writes to him that his debt of $500 and five years' interest can be settled for $180. Had Kundig returned to Detroit with Lefevere, he could have settled it without difficulty, for he advanced up to $40 for the burial ground of the Trinity congregation; and $94 for the building of St. Mary's Church, (Detroit) and Cavalli has $25 or $30. These resources and the income due him from the Trinity Church congregation in the June pew-rent would have enabled him to bring the business to a close. Now here he is in Milwaukee after Cavalli has given the word that in four weeks he will redeem the bill. Kundig desires to be left to follow his calling, which cannot be as long as the debts remain. In Milwaukee he cannot get a cent. He must have the church enlarged and have a schoolhouse, a cemetery and a pastor's house. Had Bishop (Frederick) Résé assisted him with the orphans, things would be in a better standing. The Trinity congregation for a considerable time could pay him nothing; when he labored for the Germans, too, he had nothing wherewith to pay his debts. Cavalli will call on Lefevere to hear what he can do. Kundig writes reluctantly to Lefevere in this matter, not knowing any one else in Detroit who could have any influence with the trustees. Prospects in Milwaukee begin to be a little better. Mr. S(oloman) Juneon and he began to solicit a subscription for church and school purposes. Kundig will give Lefevere good lodging next fall in the pastor's house. He will have about $300 or $400 to make a beginning. The most is presented by Protestants in and around Milwaukee. The inhabitants of Furlongs Settlement (Wisconsin) have consented to hew and haul the frame for the pastor's house to town and raise it without letting one Milwaukee man assist them.

III-2-g A.L.S. 3pp. 8vo.
9


1842 Jul 16

Beauprez, Father P(ierre) F(rancis)
Vermillionville, (Louisiana)

To Bishop Ant(hony) Blanc
New Orleans, Louisiana)

Beauprez has just learned of Blanc's arrival in New Orleans after a long, difficult trip. He will give some details of the situation at Lafayette. Everything is very badly organized and it is ten times worse than New Iberia. Here he has only a little shanty of a house; the trustees promised to furnish one but have done nothing. What discourages him most is the great ignorance here; it is almost as if there had never been a priest there. The children who made their First Communion last year are also ignorant. It looks as if Father (Lawrence) Peyretti had not given any instructions during all the time he was here. Beauprez has made several trips into the parish and especially below the Bayou and the last time he was there he almost lost his horse and his life because of the mosquitos. He saw Mr. Young who did not encourage him to build a new chapel because times are too hard. However, Beauprez has begun a subscription to build a chapel at Pont-Perry. If Blanc had sent him here on his arrival from Europe he could have done better for the new church because last winter they complained less than now because the people have had to sell their cotton at a low price. They should have built a church but they could not collect anything. The trustees have again had the folly to appoint the same treasurer and the same collector who pocket the little they collect. Everything here is on the same basis as at his arrival at Baton Rouge, that is, the trustees doing nothing. He is pleased to see that church is well attended; very different from New Iberia and Baton Rouge. He has had 204 baptisms since he arrived. It seems the people of New Iberia feel the loss of him; he said Mass there last week and they were very glad to see him. If Blanc intends to visit Lafayette this year to give Confirmation, Beauprez would not be ready until the 18th or 19thSunday after Pentecost. He could have one or two priests from Grand Coteau to help him. He has just been told that Father (Nicholas) Point, S.J. will leave soon; this will be a great loss for Beauprez. He sends regards to Father Jeanjean; Blanc is to tell him that Beauprez received the things Jeanjean sent.

A.L.S. (French)

--------
(1842 Jul 16)

Beauprez, Father P(ierre) F(rancis)
(Vermillionville, Louisiana)

To Bishop Ant(hony) Blanc
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

Theodule Hebert wishing to marry the widow of J. Bergeron neé Else Guedry, first cousins, they ask for a dispensation.
A.L.S. (French)
V-4-m A.L.S. (French) 4pp. 4to.
11


1842 Jul 19

Lefevre, Peter Paul, Coad. Bp., Detroit
Detroit, Michigan

to Bishop John Baptist Purcell
of Cincinnati, Ohio

On his return from the mission he received Purcell's favor of June 29, but his duties have prevented his answering since his arrival from Cincinnati. He arrived at Cleveland after ten days traveling. After some time in Detroit he made his visitations to Monroe, Bay Settlement, Mackinac, (Michigan), Milwaukee, Green Bay, $1200 from them to go to Washington on pretended business and was trying to intimidate them into paying $4000 more for his trouble. Judging from this Lefevre concludes that to give the Indians a full classical education is doing him more harm than good. Has established his temperance society and gave the pledge to Father (Floriment) Bonduel at Green Bay and to Father Santille at Mackinac, and to 600 others including 400 Indians.
P.S. Sends his regards to Father Edward Purcell and asks for the Telegraph.

II-4-h A.L.S. 3pp. 8vo.
19


1842 Jul 19

Machebeuf, Father P. (Joseph)
Cleveland, Ohio

to Bishop John Baptist Purcell
of Cincinnati, Ohio

Machebeuf while visiting Father McLaughlin in Cleveland met a friend from his own country Father Keller(?) And seizes this opportunity to write to Purcell. He asks about the society for the liberty of Canada, calling themselves "Patriots." Father Amadeus Louis Rappe is well. He was in Sandusky last week. Does not see Father (Joseph) McNamee who lives like a hermit. Father Tschenhenss expects another German priest. Father (Joseph) Freygang lost his law suit and since his people refused to pay the money he was bailed out by the Methodists who hope to gain him. He has to teach in the seminary at Norwalk because of the fewness of his schismatical party. The Irish want to buy his unfinished church. He hopes to have a roof on the church in Sandusky by fall. Lower Sandusky has done better since his last letter.

II-4-h A.L.S. 2pp. 8vo.
11


1842 Jul 19

McLaughlin, Father Peter
Cleveland, Ohio

to Bishop John Baptist Purcell
of Cincinnati, Ohio

He has delayed his writing to present the following facts. At Liverpool there are two churches, one brick and the other frame. The brick one, which was blessed by Purcell is the better in location and accessibility to Graften and Medina, but he asks Purcell to decide. The people of Suffield or Randolf have been coming in great numbers to Cuyahoga Falls and to Cleveland, and to care for them McLaughlin proposes to visit Suffield if Purcell approves. He lists the places he visits. Carlisle, Liverpool, Cuyahoga Falls, and Suffield once a month. Avon and Vermillion at other times. Painesville on a lake trip. He speaks of the progress of the church in Cleveland and of the Temperance parade on July 4. The absence of the treasurer prevents his sending the money. Father (George) Wilson visited Cleveland on his way to Canada and preached. Father (P. Joseph) Machebeuf visited them and McLaughlin speaks of his virtues and his church problem. Does not know the bearer of the letter. Speaks of a lad John Kane whom he is teaching Latin and Greek and his going to Cincinnati.
II-4-h A.L.S. 4pp. 8vo.
13


1842 Jul 20

(Chanche), Bishop John Joseph
Natchez, (Mississippi)

To Bishop (Anthony) Blanc
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

(Chanche) hopes that between Blanc, Bishop (Michael) Portier, and Father (James) Lesne they will not let (Chanche) lose that money. They are to see how soon they can let him have it. Portier has not yet answered his letter. (Chanche) had consulted Portier on the sending of Father (Albino) Desgaultière to Paulding. Is Father (Augustin) de Angelis going to Pascagoula? The matter of (Jefferson) College is not yet decided. A meeting of the trustees is to be held next Saturday. The opposition is very great. (Chanche) was afraid that the affair of Madame de Beaumont was not at an end. He would not be surprised if there was a place of rendezvous appointed. Mr. de Bacourt will be glad to receive any information. From what Blanc said when (Chanche) was in New Orleans, he supposes Blanc was in debt to the Citizen's Bank for 5 or $6,000. He could pay $6000 by buying up its depreciated paper. (Chanche) is sorry to learn the details concerning Mrs. Waggaman; she must suffer much. If Blanc gets the money from Portier he is to send Lesne up with it. There is a little boy here about 6 years old whose mother is dead and whose Father has abandoned him and is somewhere in New Orleans. The little boy is with his grandmother who is not able to support him. Could Blanc not give him a place somewhere in New Orleans?

V-4-m A.L.S. 4pp. 4to.
9


1842 Jul 21

Bolles, John A.
(Boston, Massachusetts)
to O(restes) A. Brownson
(Boston, Massachusetts)

He has had the fortune to deliver an oration last year before the literary societies of Brown University. After writing the address he got Dickinson to print six copies for his own private use, but not a line of it has ever been published. Friends have urged him to send a copy to Brownson's "Review" for publication. He doesn't feel at all sure that it is worthy of the honor, but at least gives Brownson a chance to decide that. If it is rejected he requests Brownson to return the address.
I-3-f A.L.S. 1p. 8vo.
1


1842 Jul 23

DeGoesbriand, Father Louis
Louisville, Ohio

to Bishop John Baptist Purcell
of Cincinnati, Ohio

He has delayed his letter because he had nothing to write about in the tranquility of his mission, except a few individual drinker for whom he intends to start a temperance society. He has received a bell from Father Geisat for which he would like to have Purcell give the solemn blessing on August 25, the feast of St. Louis. Also on that day, his feast day, he desires to give solemn benediction. The number of Paschal communions was 540. The church of St. Genevieve, near Mt. Eaton, Holmes County is progressing. The congregation there has increased by five families with more expected in the fall. But they need spiritual retreat. Has received Carriere's book and will bring it to Cincinnati when he comes for the retreat. Tuesday he goes to bless the church at Massillon.
P.S. His health is always good, and he is always satisfied.
II-4-h A.L.S. 3pp. 8vo. (French)
4


1842 Jul 24

(Raess), Andre, Coad. Bishop Strasbourg
Strasbourg, (France)

to Bishop John Baptist Purcell
of Cincinnati, Ohio

He thanks Purcell for his letter and states that he has received a letter on the same subject from Father Brassac, the Precious Blood Fathers. He believes that they will be a fine acquisition to the Cincinnati diocese because of his experience with them. He regards a religious congregation most precious especially in such dioceses as those of the United States. He desires any priest coming to France from Cincinnati to bring him a book by Father Lemke of Philadelphia of which he does not know the name. He speaks of criticisms of the church he has heard and his answer.

II-4-h A.L.S. 3pp. 12mo. (French)

5


1842 Jul 24

Robertson, Mrs.
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

Mrs. Robertson asks Mr. Lennes (Father James Lesne?) to baptize the child of her servant Charlotte. The child is called Marie and was born May 29, 1842.

V-4-m D. (French) 1p. 32mo.

--------
1


1842 Jul 24

Wood, James Frederick
Rome, Italy

to Bishop John Baptist Purcell
of Cincinnati, Ohio

In answer to Purcell's of May 18, Wood says that he is now in possession of a positive answer from Monsignor Cadolini, after a second visit with him. Cadolini opposes Purcell's visit now because of the recent visit of Purcell in 1839 and because the Propaganda is now drained of money by the missions of Oceania. He suggested that Purcell wait until the next spring and after the Council bringing the decrees to Rome as Rosati had done at the last council. Wood offers apologies for his error mentioned in a previous letter. Cadolini expressed the willingness of Propaganda to help Purcell secure German priests from Vienna. Bishop (Joseph) Rosati is still in Rome. Wood speaks of his studies and of the change in superiors of the college. A young convert from Anglicanism named Ivers is in Rome and intends to study for the priesthood. Wood sends remembrances to his friends.

II-4-h A.L.S. 4pp. 8vo.
5


1842 Jul 25

Bettiss, Jonas A.
Marblehead, (Massachusetts)

to O(restes) A. Brownson
Boston, Mass(achusetts)

The committee of the T. A. Society wish to return their sincere acknowledgments to Brownson for his patriotic, eloquent address of July 4. They shall always remember the high stand he has taken on the question of temperance. It shall add lustre to an already shining character. They have the deepest feelings of contempt for the malicious attacks made upon him by the press because of his unwillingness to pledge himself entirely to any party. The people, however, are convinced that he is merely anxious to discover truth and to regenerate his race. They feel that, when an impartial historian will have recorded the facts, his name will be conspicuous while the name of his slanderers shall sink into oblivion.

I-3-f A.L.S. 2pp. 8vo.
2


1842 Jul 25

Gale, Levi H.
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

To Father (Stephen) Rousselon
(New Orleans, Louisiana)

Receipt for $1.14 for freight and primage on the "Shannon" from Havre. J.V. Chaery(?) signs for Gale.

V-4-m Receipt 1p. 32mo.
2


1842 Jul 27

Despond, Ch(arles) and Sons
Havre, (France)

To Father (Stephen) Rousselon
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

Despond encloses (no enclosure) the bill of lading on the Rubicon, Captain Thompson, which Perisse Brothers asked them to send. These packages are for Father (Joseph) Cretin, missionary at Prairie de Chien.

V-4-m A.L.S. (French) 1p. 4to.
2


1842 Jul 29

Timon, C.M., Father John
St. Louis, Missouri

to Bishop John Baptist Purcell
of Cincinnati, Ohio

As early as possible in September two Vincentian priests and two lay brothers will start for Cincinnati to be at Purcell's orders for the seminary. Timon's duties require that he begin a retreat at St. Louis the first and second weeks of September. He will start for Cincinnati in time to begin the retreat the fourth Sunday for the clergy and laity. Further advice is to be sent to the Cathedral at St. Louis.
II-4-h A.L.S. 1p. 8vo.
4


1842 Aug 2

Francais, Father (N.)
Avoyelles, (Louisiana)

To Father (Stephen) Rousselon
New Orleans, L(ouisian)a

Francais owes Father (Edward) D'hauw six piastres and Mr. Hofer, the tailor $30. He has this amount in notes coming due December 5. Francais sends them and asks Rousselon to pay these debts as soon as the banks will pay. He takes advantage of an opportunity to send them as he does not think he can come to the city before March. He has to live on credit; if Rousselon has any extra Mass intentions he asks him to send them. He has learned that Father (Constantine) Ma(e)nhaut has been named Bishop at San Domingo. Francais is well but wishes the Bishop would give him his exeat for next March. If he does not get it he might leave without it.
P.S. Rousselon is to write whether he has received the 37 piastres. (The address side of the letter states that it is sent through) M(ada)me(?) De Generes.

]V-4-m A.L.S. (French) 3pp. 4to.
4


1842 Aug 3

O'Sullivan, J(ohn) L.
New York, (New York)

To O(restes) A. Brownson
Boston, Mass(achusetts)

He found Brownson's article and letter upon his return from Washington. He regrets that he finds it now impossible to insert the article in the September issue of the "Democratic Review". The length of the article makes it inadvisable to use it in this issue when he considers the miscellaneous class of readers he has to deal with. It will be held for the October issue which is probably best after all, since it will serve as an opening article in that issue, a copy of which he intends to send to Brownson's readers together with Brownson's closing number. It is fitting that that should be the number containing this introduction. With regard to the length of Brownson's articles he leaves it to the latter's own pleasure, though he generally likes them between 15 and 20 pages. If they are too long the effect will be more harmful than beneficial. He asks permission to use Brownson's portrait so as to individualize the acquaintance between him and his readers.
I-3-f A.L.S. 2pp. 8vo.
2


1842 Aug 3

_______, Charles Augustus, Bishop of Eichstadt, Bavaria Eichstadt, Bavaria

to (Bishop John Baptist Purcell
of Cincinnati, Ohio)

Father Anrees Tusch a Capuchin having appealed to him as Visitor Apostolic of the Franciscans for a recommendation so that he might enter the diocese of Cincinnati. The Bishop tells Purcell that this Father Tusch was a member of the Capuchin Order, but finding himself unable to abide by the discipline of the Order, asked and obtained through his Provincial from the Holy See permission to leave the Order. However, since he has lived at Eichstadt, he has given no cause for trouble and has caused the Bishop to hope that he will be a worthy priest in a secular condition, since he has both learning and zeal for souls. The bishop gives him his dimissorials with the expectation that he will give satisfactory service to Purcell.
F.M. Clos, secretary signed the document.

II-4-h D.S. 2pp. 8vo. (Latin)
5


1842 Aug 4

Lynch, C. Anne
Providence, Rhode Island

to O(restes) A. Brownson
Boston, (Massachusetts)

She received Brownson's letter on August 3. She says that, of late, Brownson's views have changed and do not convey to her the same ideas that the earlier ones did. This, however, does not in any degree affect her regard for Brownson.

I-3-f A.L.S. 3pp. 8vo.
1


1842 Aug 4

(Portier), Bishop Michael
Mobile, (Alabama)

To Bishop A(nthony) Blanc
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

Father (Louis) Moni died last night at 11:35. (Portier) asks Blanc to have everything ready to receive the remains next Saturday on the Creole.
(P.S.) (Portier) will accompany the body.

V-4-m A.L.S. (French) 2pp. 4to.
2


1842 Aug 6

Hughes, John, Bishop of New York
New York, N.Y.

to Bishop John Baptist Purcell
of Cincinnati, Ohio

The bearer, Patrick Polard, came to this country lately and finding New York overstocked with people seeking work has decided to go West. Hughes thinks his good appearance and manners will purposes Purcell in his favor. The original of the letter he bears from Daniel O'Connell, Hughes saw before it was lost in the emigration office. Has time merely to assure Purcell of his continued affection.
II-4-h A.L.S. 1p. 8vo.
2


1842 Aug 6

Lupke, Cardinal Ant., Bishop of Osnabrück
Osnabrück, Hanover

to Bishop John Baptist Purcell
of Cincinnati, Ohio

Lupke has received May 17 by Brimsmann Purcell's letter. He is pleased to hear of the good work of the two missionaries from his diocese, Father (William J.) Horstmann and Father (Augustus) Brickweede. About the legacy of Bernard Kemper of $1000 for the anniversary in St. Alphonsus Church according to Purcell's letter he wrote at once to Father (Hercules) Brassac but he received neither letter nor money from him, presumably because he had no mandate from Purcell. Expresses his good wishes for the Pope and for Purcell and asks prayers for himself.

II-4-h A.L.S. 2pp. 12mo. (Latin)
6


1842 Aug 6

Picard(?), J.
N(ew) O(rleans, Louisiana)

Receipt for one piastre, 7 escalins from Widow Paris for 8 bottles of beer and 7 bottles of wine.

V-4-m A. Receipt S. (French) 1p. 32mo.
1


1842 Aug 8

Elder, Father A(lexius) J.
Balt(imore, Maryland)

To Bishop (Anthony) Blanc
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

Enclosed Blanc will receive a bill of lading for (F.M.) Brunet's trunk and a box of books for Father (John) Timon. (This letter is written on the bill of lading) dated July 30 on the "Mary," Edmund Crosby, Master.

V-4-m A.L.S. 3pp. 4to.
4


1842 Aug 8

Rousselon, Father E(tienne)
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

Bishop Anthony Blanc informs Father C(onstantine)
Maenhaut, pastor of St. Mary's, that a dispensation from the three banns is granted to Joseph Lesueur and Ann Clara O'Reilly.
V-4-m D.S. (Latin) 1p. Folio
4


1842 Aug 8

Kundig, (Father) Martin
Milwaukee, Wisconsin Territory

to Bishop Peter Paul Lefevere
Detroit, Michigan

Yesterday, seeing his congregation unusually numerous, Kundig announced that next Sunday the divine service for the German congregation would begin at 8:30 and for the English at 10:30. He has not yet obtained permission to celebrate two Masses, but had reason to believe that Lefevere would consent as soon as he should hear of the circumstances. Yesterday they rang the Presbyterian bell on their steeple and made it Catholic. "The Society" held its first monthly meeting; it has brought in already about $60. The subscription is daily increasing. The schoolhouse goes on well and so also the arrangements for the addition to the church. Kundig never yet saw a congregation of different languages and national feelings so well united. It is God's work. A copper ball 20 inches in diameter is being prepared for the steeple; the cross, four feet long---the steeple to be tinned---will be seen at a great distance. Dr. (Louis) Cavalli informed Kundig of the kind answer Lefevere gave him when he called on Kundig's account. Kundig thanks Lefevere for it. He will never go into debt in the future. At present Kundig cannot expect an income as long as they are building. Next week he enters a house next to the church where he will live with the schoolteacher, and elderly and saintly man. As soon as he can spare anything, he will send it to Lefevere. He enumerates his expenditures. After one or two months any priest can follow him and will have an income, a house and sufficient to live, though one priest will find hard work, the mission being very heavy, and the Germans increasing daily. P.S. (Father Florimond) Bonduel's watch will be worth $15 when repaired. Watchmaker demand's $4 for repairing it.

III-2-g A.L.S. 3pp. 8vo.
4


1842 Aug 10]

Van den Broeck, (Father) J(ohn) T.
La Petite Chute Gr Kockalin W(isconsin) T(erritory)
To Bishop P(eter) P(aul) Lefevere of Zela
Detroit, Michigan

The articles he received pleased the Indians greatly. On Sunday, August 7, he solemnly blessed the bell, to satisfy the Indians; devotion and edify the neophytes whose greatest joy is to pass feast days in God's house using prayers and canticles and nourishing themselves with God's speech. After the solemn chanting of mass and exposition of the Blessed Sacrament in the ciborium (Lefevere) gave the church, he began the ceremonies. One must be present to realize with what joy the poor savages sang the chants and praised God. During the ceremony they chanted psalms in their language and responded in Latin when necessary as he had taught them. The regard themselves fortunate to know the moment God calls them to the mysteries; they regard the sound of the bell as the divine voice. After vespers he explained to them the prayers and ceremonies and reminded them how Bishop Lefevere loved them and made them so many presents so that they might be good Christians. He is happy to be able to satisfy their pious desire to have a solemn procession from time to time since they have an occasion to sing God's praises and pray for the Church's intentions during the jubilee time. Many outside the Church regard themselves fortunate to be able to assist at the Holy Sacrifice and pray for "Ketchi Mekate-okwanie," the great black robe, the bishop who gave the church such gifts. The rosaries Lefevere sent please them for the prayers of the rosary they pray most. They carry them about their necks. One can distinguish the Christians from pagans by this. The Indians asked Van den Broeck to remind Lefevere to tell them if he has some medals of the Holy Virgin. The church still lacks cruets and holy water basins. Van den Broeck hopes Lefevere will remember them when the occasion presents itself. Van den Broeck has discovered that of two people he baptized and married the wife was formerly married by pagan rites to the brother of her present husband. The brother is long ago dean and was not baptized. He will be obliged to follow the direction Lefevere mentioned. He asks Lefevere for alphabets for the children, who have none. Father (John Martin) Kundig promised to send him some Germans as tenant farmers. Van den Broeck has made arrangements for locating them but fears Kundig has forgotten. He would like to know for sure, if possible. Father (Francis Vincent) Badin wrote him through Mr. Desnoyer. But he seems to have forgotten that the $100 he sent May 8, 1841, from the bank of Michigan was not good and that Mr. Michel would not receive it, and since no one would receive it he was obliged to give some of it to Mr. Desnoyer at the value of $50 in merchandise, and that the $100 for Mr. Mitchel could not be paid. Father Badin wrote November 10 that he would try to replace this money for Mr. Mitchel. But since the dollars are not paid for, Mitchel mad Van den Broeck pay the 7% and wrote him that he will have to take him to court. Van den Broeck answered July 22 that he had written to Badin that he should have patience until the answer. In joining with the savages in thanking Lefevere for his benefits, he hopes they will be honored to see him at the little falls. Little falls will become great by his greatness. Respects. P.S. To avoid a double postage he adds Father Badin's letter of November 10, 1841.

A.L.S. (French) 8vo.

--------
1841 Nov 10

Badin, Father F(rancis) V(incent), V.G.
(Detroit, Michigan)

To Father J(ohn) T. Van den Broeck
(La Petite Chute, Wisconsin Territory)

Van den Broeck's letter of October 25 (1841) surprised and troubled Badin. Badin has just written Mitchell that he has both Van den Broeck's draft of $100 of December 6, 1840, which he paid in July to Mr. Brown, Notary Public, and the protest which is adjoined ("co-le" for colle) etc., etc.... he will replace them as soon as possible. He tells Van den Broeck not to sell anything but remain at his post, where he is useful for God's glory. The new Coadjutor, Lefevere, whom Badin is awaiting daily will aid Van den Broeck greatly and report his great services and sacrifices to the government. M. Des(noyers') action appears like a Yankee trick (?) To have 100 for 50, and Badin could say 25 for he gains half on the merchandise. The great judge of consciences will bring to light all the subterfuges of men. Badin wishes that God will give him (Desnoyers) grace to do penance. He asks Lefevere to pray for him and Desnoyers, "etc, etc.,..."

III-2-g copy (French) 3pp. 8vo.
3


1842 Aug 10

Vassel, J(osep)h
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

A bill for $7.82 for postage for the Bishop and Fathers Rousselon, Ma(e)nhaut, Perché, Mr. Vezian and Father Fort.

V-4-m A. Bill S. (French) 1p. 12mo.
0


(1842 Aug 15)

Beauregard, B.
(New Orleans, Louisiana)

To Charles Maurian
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

The petition of Pierre Brindjonc and Joseph Chapuis: Charles Gerard is indebted to the petitioner for $1800 for the following causes and by privilege upon the sums or notes he has to receive from Mr. Depouilly, principal contractor of (St. Augustine) Church at the corner of Bayou and St. Claude Streets or from Bishop A(nthony) Blanc for balance due. By the contract, a copy of which is annexed, they contracted with Gerard to make all the joiner work for $2800, payable $1000 on the two notes of Blanc and $800 in cash to be paid during work every 15 days. They began the work in January, 1842 and continued until now. Gerard has refused or neglected to pay and also to deliver the notes. The petitioner prays that Gerard be cited to answer their demand, that judgment be rendered. The petitioner prays that a writ of sequestration be issued to secure their lien.
Copy

--------
1842 Aug 2

Brindjonc, Pierre
(New Orleans, Louisiana)

Brindjonc swears that Gerard is indebted to them by privilege in the sum of $800 and further in the sum of $1000 in two notes of Blanc at 2 and 3 years with interest at 6 percent. Gerard is about to receive, and dispose of, from Depouilly or Blanc, the amount in cash or notes, for the erection of a church upon which they have a privilege of workmen in order to deprive them of the same, wherefore Brindjonc prays that a writ of sequestration be issued. Louis R. Courtin certifies the above. Copy

--------
1842 Aug 2

Petot, H.
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

A writ of sequestration is to be issued giving bond of $2800 with Henry Jolissaint as security.

Copy

Beauregard's petition to Maurian is repeated here in french. Courtin on August 15, 1842 certifies that it is a true statement of sums of money to deliver to De Pouilly and to hold for Daly and Fullick and for Gerard.

V-4-m Copies (English and French) 5pp. Folio
11


1842 Aug 16

Butler, Father Thomas R.
Feeder of Canal above Lockport near Piqua, Ohio
to Bishop John Baptist Purcell
of Cincinnati, Ohio

According to Purcell's final instructions he has spent three days at Piqua and four on the Canal and has found 40 adults and about the same number of children who have not been confirmed. There are many more between Munster and some two or three hundred above St. Mary's. He thinks that more than 100 can be prepared for confirmation including the Germans at Munster and the French at Jacksonville. He will continue his work there and then move on to the Deep Cut. He suggests that Purcell visit these people. Father (Emanuel) Thienpont gave the pledge to several here and Father (Louis) Navarron and Father Pin to others. He has had a large number of communions and people have gone to great expense to allow the children to be prepared for confirmation. He asks Purcell to answer whether he will come or not. A large number at Dayton are also waiting to be confirmed. He outlines an itinerary for Purcell to these places. He will send word to Father Herzog and Father Navarron, should Purcell come.

II-4-h A.L.S. 3pp. 12mo.
9


1842 Aug 16

Flagg, William J.
New Haven, (Connecticut)

to O(restes) A. Brownson
New York, (New York)

He invites Brownson to give a lecture before the New Haven Young Men's Institute any convenient time in the fall or winter. The people of New Haven are desirous to hear Brownson of whom they have heard so much and know so little. He may feel assured of the fact that he shall lecture to the most intelligent audience that the city can afford.
I-2-f A.L.S. 1p. 8vo.
2


1842 Aug 17

(Blanc), Bishop Ant(hony)
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

To Father (Matthew Bernard) Anduze
(New Orleans, Louisiana)

(Blanc) made an effort to go out today at 10:15. He went to Anduze's station but was told he had gone out. This walk tired (Blanc) a little and he probably will not go out again today. He wished only to notify Anduze that Father (Stephen) Rousselon would today assume the duties of pastor and will do the best he can until the quarters intended for him are at his disposal. If Blanc had seen Anduze they would have outlined together the functions of Anduze's office as Theological as it is not a position which they can canonically introduce in the Cathedral of New Orleans, since they have neither a Doctor of Theology nor a benefice. They will keep the title as long as they consider it useful for whomever is charged with preaching on all the occasions when the Bishop is prevented from doing so. (The occasions in which he is to preach are listed here). Anduze is to continue to direct the two communities he has directed up to the present, the Ladies of Providence and the Sisters of the Presentation until other arrangements are made. Blanc has not mentioned the Christmas novena; the late Father (Louis) Moni usually had it preached by an outside priest but if one cannot be procured Blanc hopes Anduze will do it. January 8 and sermons for charity will also be his. The pastor has the right to the pulpit on ordinary Sundays and the administration of Baptism and celebration of marriages belong to him and also the publication of banns. Visits to the sick are left to Anduze's charity. In the church, when the Bishop officiates without pontifical officers, Anduze will be beside him, however, (Blanc) does not intend this to be a constant obligation.
(P.S.) Note: these last two sentences are imperfect, being written from memory. On the back of the letter in pencil as follows: If Anduze has any comments he is to make them; Blanc is so tired he cannot put them in a different order. (In pencil on this copy): (Blanc's secretary?) is to write this out and the first time (Blanc) sees it he will sign it. (P.S.) Note: These last two sentences are imperfect, being written from memory. On the back of the letter in pencil as follows: If Anduze has any comments he is to make them; Blanc is so tired he cannot put them in a different order. (In pencil on this copy): (Blanc's secretary?) Is to write this out and the first time (Blanc) sees him he will sign it.
V-4-m Copy (French) 3pp. 9vo.
5


1842 Aug 17

Brunet, Father F.M.
Avoyelles, (Louisiana)

To Bishop (Anthony) Blanc
New Orleans, L(ouisian)a

Father (N.) Francais received a letter today from Father (Stephen) Rousselon in which he said he had again made a request to Cambrai for Brunet's dimissorial letters. The Archbishop of Cambrai has replied that the proper authorities of the place where the subject is should make the request. Brunet leaves everything in Blanc's hands.
V-4-m A.L.S. (French) 2pp. 4to.
3


1842 Aug 19

Breaux, M.D., Robert
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

To Bishop Anthony Blanc
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

Breaux has been taught to never put his own pride in the way of repairing the wrong of any act of his against a man who is a total stranger to him. Born under the tropical sun, when he loves, he loves deeply; when he hates, he hates deeply. Blanc performed Breaux's marriage ceremony and at that time Breaux felt a sincere friendship toward him; more than once, he defended Blanc when someone attacked him. But there is another man whom Breaux loves more than Blanc; it is Father (Louis) Moni. When Blanc became bishop he showed hostility toward Moni; from that time on Breaux ceased to be one of Blanc's friends. Breaux attacked Blanc, thinking it to be his right. He is in the habit of visiting Father (Matthew Bernard) Anduze but he swears that Anduze never advised or approved of any attack on Blanc. Breaux alone wrote the article is last Sunday's Gazette, he alone commented on Blanc's letter in the August 17th Gazette. He did it, not with the intention of desecrating religion, but with the desire to combat what he thought to be unjust. This is not an apology but an act of justice toward a calumniated man.

V-4-m A.L.S. (French) 4pp. 4to.
3


1842 Aug 20

(Garciadiego y Moreno), Bishop Fran(cis)co
Santa Barbara, California

(Garciadiego) has examined the case of the marriage of Teodoro Trujillo and Casilda Zepulveda brought before the ecclesiastical court by her against her Father Henry Zepulveda, showing violence and lack of consent. He has heard the reasons of the Defendor and of the Theologian and he agrees with the pronouncement of the consultor Father Narciso Duran that this marriage, performed in St. Gabriel's Church on April 13, is null and void and that both are free. (Garciadiego) assumes ignorance in the case of the instigators of this sad marriage and even for Casilda's perjury and imposes no punishment. He recommends to the local authorities of Los Angeles that they treat this case with charity, looking out for Casilda's safety and warning her Father to treat her with kindness or he will be punished. One copy of this decree is to be sent to the Prefect of this 2ndDistrict and the other to Father Thomas Estenega to be read on the first feast day at High Mass.
Signed by the bishop with his seal and by his secretary,Father J(os)e M(ari)a de J(esu)s Gonz(ale)z.

V-4-m A.D.S. (Spanish) 3pp. Folio
6


1842 Aug 20

Nill, James
Chambersburg, (Pennsylvania)

To F(rancis) P. McFarland, Mt. St. Mary's
Emmittsburgh, Maryland

McFarland's letter in regard to his Father's claim on the estate of Dr. Oellig has been received. Gov. Burns has not yet settled the estate. He presumes that he will have it audited before many months. The dividend will be small and when received by him it will be attended to.
I-l-a A.L.S. 1p. 4to.
1


1842 Aug 20

(Odin), Bishop John Mary
Galveston, Texas

to Bishop A(nthony) Blanc
New Orleans, L(ouisian)a

(Odin) is back in Galveston after an absence of 5 weeks. He has just spent a month at Houston and 10 days along the Brazos. On July 18 he opened the chapel at Houston; it is a small building 50 by 25 feet and suitable to the present situation. When the people are better off he will have it plastered. A Protestant gave (Odin) 6 acres of land on the Brazos for a church. There are about 95 Catholics around there, originally from Kentucky and very fond of their religion. They have promised to build a chapel in the fall; the Protestants will assist them. Several have asked for instructions in the Faith. At Houston also several wish to become Catholics. Perhaps the jubilee will renew the fervor of the Catholics. (Odin) began it here last Sunday. Their political horizon is dark. The president called Congress to meet on June 27; they passed a bill giving the president full power to start war at once against Mexico. To the general dissatisfaction of all in general, the president vetoed it saying that it gave him more authority than the constitution allowed him and pointing out the impossibility of war in the miserable state to which they are reduced. 500 volunteers dispersed for lack of provisions and clothing. There are no more hurrahs for Texas. They hope that the United States and England will recognize their independence. If it is true that Mexico has received two warships, it will be very embarrassing. (Odin) has had news from Fathers (Eudald) Estany, (C.M.) and (Michael) Calvo, (C.M.); they are well and seem full of courage amid their troubles and privations. (Odin) has learned lately that the firm of Benoist and Hackney has suspended operations. Father (Bonaventure) Armengol was to have deposited some money with them to (Odin's) credit. He counts on this to pay $300 which he owes on the house he bought in Galveston. (Odin) has written Armengol to give the money to Father (Stephen) Rousselon. (Odin) still has some money with Benoist and Hackney but he will need it to pay the debt on the church at Houston.

V-4-m A.L.S. (French) 3pp. 4to.
7


1842 Aug 21

Anduze, Father M(atthew) B(ernard)
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

To Bishop (Anthony Blanc
New Orleans, Louisiana)

In the serious circumstances in which they find themselves Anduze believes it his duty to declare the truth. When (Blanc) called Anduze to his house and in the presence of Dr. Labatut told Anduze that the offence he had received was not intentional, Anduze took him at his word. Since then Anduze learned how a "grateful friend" had pressed for the appointment of Father (Stephen) R(ousselon) by the exaggerated report of the lists of signatures in favor of Father (Constantine) Maenhaut. (Blanc) told Anduze that he had not wanted to do this without consulting Anduze, and that he wished to name him but that his hand was forced. Anduze assured the public, shocked by a crying injustice, that he had never had any ambition to be pastor at New Orleans. He expressed his opinion openly even before Father (Louis) Moni's death. When the clandestine appointment of Rousselon surprised the public, the trustees were indignant, believing they had some rights. They say that Anduze stirs up the trustees. Is it he who exposes what (Blanc) had asked to be kept secret? Does (Blanc) want witnesses ready to swear to what Father (Edward) D'ha(u)w told them, "We have labored a long time; they will drive us out." Is it not spread about that Anduze killed Moni and was not Anduze obliged to refute these lies by a correspondence of 29 letters written from Mobile? Did not Father (Napoleon Joseph) P(erch)é(?) say to S( )I. "The bishop and I have never liked Moni." To say that Anduze viewed R(ousselon)'s appointment with pleasure would be to lie. He considers the appointment null and he believes any ecclesiastical tribunal would agree with him. In his interview in Labatut's presence, (Blanc) showed the greatest confidence in him and a few days later he received a letter containing the most humiliating orders. This to a priest of 22 years who had always fulfilled the most difficult tasks with absolute submission, to a priest 48 years old, in the United States since he was 19. The letter of the 17th has just struck the last blow by notifying him that he had just installed (Rousselon) as pastor of the Cathedral and that the theology would (have certain duties as outlines). Baptisms and marriages were prohibited to him except those special ones where the parties wanted only Anduze. Father (Felipe) Ascensio is in no worse position and he performs French, English, German, etc. baptisms. The first case is that of Mr. Bernadas whose marriage was to be in Spanish and Anduze had to send them to Maenhaut. It is not (Blanc) who would so humiliate an old priest of the diocese and the proof is that (Blanc) signs "With affectionate sentiments." Anduze believes in the sincerity of that declaration and he believes that the one who made it did not dictate the humiliating conditions in the letter of the 17th. (Blanc) will find no resistence in Anduze. He will appeal to Rome against any abuse which could come from misguided authority. He expects only goodness and justice from (Blanc) when he consults his own inclinations, but in his nervous and irritable state Anduze fears that bad impressions make him act precipitately.

V-4-m A.L.S. (French) 12pp. 8vo.
9


1842 Aug 22

(Chanche), Bishop John Joseph
Natchez, (Mississippi)

To Bishop (Anthony) Blanc
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

Blanc must be in trouble, Father (Louis) Moni dead and the anxiety about his successor. Then, Father (Constantine) Maenhaut gone to S(an)t(o) Domingo, doubtless to prepare for the longer voyage to Rome. This absence will give Father (Stephen) Rousselon some active business. When (Chanche) wants information concerning Madame Beaumont he will write to Blanc. Mr. de Bacourt who started for France the 12th will write from Paris concerning her. (Chanche) has written to the King of the French for an altar piece for his church and to the queen for a bell of 3500 pounds. De Bacourt is the bearer of his letter and has promised his influence. (Chanche) never doubted that among them, they would manage not to let him lose the amount he left with them; but it would be so welcome in the beginning of next month. The church is going on; the people have confidence in him. He has written a second time to Bishop (Michael) Portier but no answer. Last Friday (Chanche) withdrew his proposal for Jefferson College. All the fanatical spirit of the neighborhood had been roused; they made restrictions which (Chanche) could not submit to. But the whole subject has produced a very beneficial effect. All the respectable portion of the community are for him; Protestants themselves openly espoused his cause. (Chanche) had another bilious attack; the sickly season is approaching. (Chanche) will send the orphans from Natchez down the river and Blanc will have to take them. (Chanche) hopes in 12 or 18 months he will be able to provide for them; he cannot think of it now. Sister (Francis) Regis will never refuse an orphan. (Chanche) has no news from the North except that Bishop (Benedict Joseph) Fenwick is going to Europe in the Fall; he doubts the information; how could Fenwick carry his big body over there? (Chanche) wrote to Portier to come and pay him a visit but he can hardly expect him; he is too heavy.
V-4-m A.L.S. 4pp. 4to.
10


1842 Aug 22

Chanche, John Joseph, Bishop of Natchez
Natchez, Mississippi

to Bishop John Baptist Purcell
of Cincinnati, Ohio

He certainly owed Moore and Mitchell $99 but if they are satisfied with less it is their fault, but he does not see how Purcell can draw on M. L'Homme for less. Chanche has failed to secure Jefferson College and wrote on Friday to withdraw his proposal. On Saturday the Episcopal minister of the place was elected president. He says he withdrew his proposal because the Trustees wanted to impose conditions to which he could not comply. At the first meeting Chanche had a majority of the Trustees but fanaticism was aroused and Methodists and Episcopalians put in requisition Trustees who had never attended a meeting with the result that they had a majority of one against him. Protestants have supported him and have suggested that he start a college of his own, but he has not the means. He must get the church off his hands first, although he regards Natchez as the river point for a college. He hopes that the fanaticism in Cincinnati has died down, but admits that they must expect persecutions. On his church the workers are at the top of the arches but he would like to have more money. The weather is very warm and the mosquitoes intolerable. Bishop (Anthony) Blanc, since Father (Louis) Moni, his curate died, and Father C. Maenhaut working in Santo Domingo to see whether he will take the proffered bishopric. He sends his regards to Purcell's brother, etc.

II-4-h A.L.S. 3pp. 8vo.
8


1842 Aug 22

Young, Father Joshue M.
Lancaster, Ohio

to Bishop John Baptist Purcell
of Cincinnati, Ohio

The accompanying pages (torn off) will indicate to Purcell the reason for his delay in answering as well as for not meeting Purcell at Columbus. He gave first communion to 23 of whom four were converts. Three members of the Lancaster congregation have died and he has made a sick call to Columbus. At the latter place the people were quite delighted with Purcell's visit, but he did not find that Fathers Purcell and Elet made any stay there at all. As to that fee, Young suggests that it go to the Cathedral fund. He suggests that Purcell make a pastoral address at the next synod about the support of the clergy. He encloses a notice for the Telegraph, about Mr. Geraghty. Father Nicholas D. Young assisted at his death and funeral. Many Protestants attended. Were it not for his need of retreat he would suggest a delay in the date because it comes during the sickly season there.

II-4-h A.L.S. 2pp. 8vo.
5


1842 Aug 23

Anduze, Father M(atthew) B(ernard)
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

To Bishop (Anthony) Blanc
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

He sees the time coming for publicity which will be a horrible evil for religion. Last night the rumor spread that an assembly of priests was preparing a statement against the trustees and a kidnaping against Anduze. Blanc has Anduze's profession of faith in his letter of yesterday of which he sends a copy and which will appear with the reply in the first Courier.

A.L.S. (French) 2pp.

Enclosure:

--------
1842 Aug 20

(Anduze, Father Matthew Bernard)
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

to The Trustees of (St. Louis Cathedral)
(New Orleans. Louisiana)

Hypocrites and liars are spreading the news that (Anduze) has come out against his superior in te difficulties between the bishop and the trustees and has approved the measures taken by the trustees. (Anduze) begs them to help him refute these calumnies by showing the public what his relations are with them.

A. Copy (French) 1p.
V-4-m A.L.S. Copy (French) 3pp. 8vo.
2


18421 Aug 23

(Loras), Mathias, Bishop of Dubuque
Burlington, (Iowa Territory).

To Bishop (Peter Paul) Lefevere
(Detroit, Michigan)

Loras acknowledges the letter of July 17. He is more convinced that Wisconsin should be erected into a new see, particularly since he saw B(isho)p (Peter Richard) Kenrick at Galena (Illinois). Kenrick would willingly cede to the new diocese certain counties from Illinois as desired by some persons. This must be examined in the next council. Detroit will have enough by having Michigan. Loras has changed his mind concerning the French catechisms. Bishop (Benedict J. Flaget) of Louisville has given encouragement with regard to the translation thereof, which is being made by M. McN (Father John McGill) editor of the Cath(olic) Advocate. Poor Iowa: no seminary, no college, no sisters, some churches and few priests. However, Loras is not discouraged. One of his Indian Missions is troubled by
Presbyterianism. He proposes next month to visit it. He is always willing to help Lefevere in Wisconsin, where five new churches were built in three years, and asks him to write often.

III-2-g A.L.S. 2pp. 8vo.
6


1842 Aug 24

(Blanc), Bishop Ant(hony)
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

To ( )
(New Orleans, Louisiana)

(Blanc) received the package this morning. But is the English translation being done? They should have it so that it can appear at the same time as the French pastoral which is being taken to the printer.
V-4-m A.L.S. (French) 1p. 8vo.
0


1842 Aug 24

Bowers, Laure Florian
Mobile, (Alabama)

To Bishop (Anthony) Blanc
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

She would like some information about the Ursuline Convent at New Orleans as an institution for the education of young girls. She would like to place one of hers and would like to have a prospectus. (P.S.) Her address is Mrs. F.P. Bowers, care of Mr. Talcott.
V-4-m A.L.S. (French) 2pp. 4to.
3


1842 Aug 24

Greene, W.B.
Methuen, Mass(achusetts)

To O(restes) A. Brownson
Chelsea, Mass(achusetts)

He is getting along famously with the people in Methuen. He is popular with them and can do pretty much as he pleases. The Doctrine of Life takes well. He has spoken in public only twice or three times, but has laid good foundation in conversation. The leading men in the Church are friendly and back him up well. He is sorry for Miss (Elizabeth) Peabody and her troubles but she is too difficult for him. She puts a personal meaning into every general statement he makes. He received a letter from Ida and she seems to be happy and in with the community.

I-3-f A.L.S. 2pp. 8vo.
2


1842 Aug 24

Kundig, Father Martin
Milwaukee, Wisconsin Territory

to Bishop P(eter) P(aul) Lefevere
Detroit, Michigan

Lefevere's letter conveying his wish for Kundig to return to Detroit came last night. Kundig is ready. He hopes his last two letters gave no offense. Though his attachment to (Milwaukee) is very great, he wants but to know the day and he will start immediately ... and better to start now than next spring for many reasons: the church, except the steeple, is finished; new addition is not yet begun; Sunday school and day school have just begun; debts are liquidated; boarding school has not yet opened. By next spring the attachment of the congregation would be increased, and his departure would be made more difficult or perhaps impossible. The principal difficulties are: 1. The attachment of the three congregations. Father (Lawrence) Kilroy will find difficulties yet have no brother priest within hundreds of miles to console him.
2. To get as much money as possible and to obtain more room in the church, Kundig holds divine service separately for the two congregations. Thus he can sell the pews twice. If he is called away, justice will require the return of the pew-rent to the Germans. The Catholics in Southport are not able to support a priest. Kundig intended to call on Lefevere in about two weeks for Father (Thomas) Morrissey. Besides Southport there are six large congregations in different directions where churches are being built or about to be begun next winter ... they all desire to have a priest, say every sixth Sunday. Morrissey could take care of them while Kundig would superintend the building. Should he be allowed to stay, he entreats Lefevere to let him know immediately and to send his belongings. He will follow the warning Lefevere gave him. He keeps nothing in his hands. All is done by the officers appointed by the society, who know a little too much to be misguided by his advice. He would have wished to see Lefevere there before leaving; but Lefevere's command will find him his most obedient servant.

III-2-g A.L.S. 4pp. 8vo.
5


1842 Aug 26

Walsh, John W.
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

The child is to be christened free by Walsh's authority. (On the back is written) Catherine.

V-4-m A.D.S. 2pp. 32mo.
0


1842 Aug 27

Brunet
Avoyelles, (Louisiana)

To Bishop (Anthony) Blanc
New Orleans, L(ouisian)a

Brunet left Father (N.) Francais' house after a stay of three and a half months in spite of him. Francais told Brunet that he did not have the means to feed a teacher, that if the Bishop wanted a school at Avoyelles he should provide for his support, that he wished to return to Europe, that the school would bring no profit and that Brunet would have very few pupils. After a month of inactivity Brunet began a school in Father (Jean) Martin's old kitchen; the first two months he had four pupils, this month ten new ones came. The pastor keeps at his house a woman to whom he has given full charge and who often mistreats Brunet. Martin on a visit to his old parishioners urged Francais to send his servant away but to no avail. Francais is determined to leave next March. The plan is to leave for Europe with Marianne who will do the cooking on the boat; he has told her brother of their coming departure. His money is to be paid back in March and he will sell his house and live quietly in Europe and work out his salvation. Last Monday Marianne began to swear and insult Brunet; at that moment the pastor arrived. Francais told his servant that she must leave. She called the pastor an unjust man, capable of wanting to withhold her wages. The pastor told Brunet that he would never have had the courage to send her away, that the authority he had given her had proved his misfortune. The next day he told Brunet that he was bringing Marianne back and that Brunet should leave at once. In a few days Brunet hopes to come and find protection until Blanc received his papers from France.

V-4-m A.L.S. (French) 4pp. 4to.
3


1842 Aug 28

Kenrick, Peter Richard, Coadjutor Bishop of St. Louis St. Louis, Missouri

to Bishop John Baptist Purcell
of Cincinnati, Ohio

Kenrick sends this letter with Mr. Meyer and encloses a letter which he believes is intended for Mr. Jordan. He will not have his seminary at St. Louis before November 1, and he suggests that Father (John) Timon, C.M. examine Jordan when he visits Cincinnati next month and see whether he is ready for Philosophy or theology to which the seminary will be restricted. He proposes to establish a grand seminaire at St. Louis and a petit seminaire at Carondelet (Missouri) to be conducted by the Viatorians, so that those who intend to become priests can get proper training. A moderate pension will be charged at this latter and no one will be admitted who has been in another seminary. He rejoices that a college for foreign missions has been erected near Dublin. He is pleased that Purcell has completed the walls of the cathedral and wishes that he could exclude rented pews. Mrs. Biddle has given a lot in the norther part of St. Louis and Father George Hamilton has undertaken to build a free church. He has urged Father Timon to complete Trinity Church but is not sure that it will be free. He understands that half of the Jesuits church will be free. He has not seen Madame Purcell. Although he has been traveling since Easter he has not covered half of his diocese. Arkansas should be made a see, also Illinois and Wisconsin. He thinks that in establishing the see of Dubuque the recent Council also intended to give sees to Illinois and Wisconsin, since Iowa has only 3,000 Catholics. He thinks that a diocese including Wisconsin, Iowa and Illinois north of Rock River should have been the diocese. He suggested Galena, Illinois as the see, because of its large population. Illinois should be a diocese with Chicago. Arkansas also with Little Rock as the see. He sends his regards to Father Edward Purcell.

II-4-h A.L.S. 4pp. 8vo.
16


1842 Aug 28

(Portier), Bishop Michael
Mobile, (Alabama)

To Bishop A(nthony) Blanc
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

(Portier) was surprised not to receive news from Blanc but his illness explains all. He realizes that Blanc's position is difficult and painful, but he does not regard it as desperate. It is better to burn at the stake than to sacrifice a principle. (Portier) has talked to the people of (New Orleans) and understands that the opinion of reasonable people is not doubtful. Blanc should be patient and put off the execution of his plan until October. Then if it is evident that he can no longer remain an idle spectator of the extravagances which scandalize the church, Blanc will kill them by his patience and silence. The time will come to talk to the Pope. Blanc is to write to all the bishops of the United States asking them to make their opinions public or at least to authorize Blanc to do so.
(P.S.) (Portier) is surprised that the trustees of St. Patrick's and of St. Vincent de Paul have not shown their sentiments.

V-4-m A.L.S. (French) 2pp. 4to.
2


1842 Aug 29

Timon, C.M., Father J(ohn), St. Mary's Seminary
(Perrysville, Missouri)

To Bishop (Anthony Blanc
New Orleans, Louisiana)

Timon received (Blanc's) letter of July 22. His sickness is yet upon him but he hopes it will not be of long duration. On September 1, Father (Anthony) Andrieu, (C.M.) starts for (Blanc's) seminary accompanied by one lay brother, a carpenter. When Timon comes down in the fall he expects to bring another subject for (Blanc's) services, particularly for the English. Andrieu has made such proficiency that he could teach English any place. Timon asks (Blanc) to think as soon as possible of supplying the parishes (the Vincentians) fill. Their priests do well but they know not how to ask or collect.
V-4-m A.L.S. 1p. 4to.
3


1842 Aug 29

Timon, C.M., Father John
St. Mary's Seminary, Barrens, Missouri

to Bishop John Baptist Purcell
of Cincinnati, Ohio

On September 1, Fathers Francis Burlando and Charles Bogliolie, Vincentians, will start for Cincinnati for the seminary and will be accompanied by two lay brothers, one a baker. As his funds are low he asks Purcell to give to two others who accompany them and go on to New York, the price of the trip of the four to Cincinnati. On the feast of St. Louis, Bishop (Peter Richard) Kenrick ordained five priests, one deacon and two minor orders and two tonsures at the Seminary. He thinks that the moving of the Seminary to St. Louis will be advantageous. He has been sick but as his fever has left him he expects to be able to go to Cincinnati.
P.S. Requests Purcell to direct the two priests to the best way to New York by Philadelphia.

II-4-h A.L.S. 1p. 8vo.
7


1842 Aug 30

(Chanche), Bishop John Joseph
Natchez, (Mississippi)

to Bishop (Anthony) Blanc
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

(Chanche) is deeply afflicted by the information in Blanc's letter of the 25th. Religion does flourish in New Orleans and this gives (Chanche) hope that the trustees will not be supported by the congregation. (Chanche) feels inclined to go to Blanc in sympathy but he has already had two attacks of bilious fever and fears a third in an atmosphere a little less pure. (Chanche) read Blanc's pastoral letter; it is worthy of the prelates of the ages of persecution. He hopes Blanc's city will not be afflicted with the epidemic; he is not without fear of it here. Bishop (Michael) Portier does not answer; that is not treating (Chanche) right. He cannot obtain anything from the people until December or January but the building is going on and (Chanche) must find means to pay the workmen. If Portier comes to New Orleans, Blanc is to speak to him earnestly.

V-4-m A.L.S. 4pp. 4to.
4


1842 Aug 30

(Odin), Bishop John Mary
Galveston, (Texas)

To Father E(tienne) Rousselon
New Orleans, L(ouisian)a

(Odin) asks Rousselon to send him by the "Merchant" the life of St. Theresa in Spanish. He will find it in one of the boxes (Odin) left at the Bishop's house. The Mexican keeps asking for it fearing that he will die before reading it. The fever which (Odin) had for almost a month last year has shown up again; he is a little better. He has not concluded the jubilee exercises; perhaps this will give more time to prepare for receiving the Sacraments. In his last letter to Bishop (Anthony) Blanc (Odin) spoke of the $300 which he had asked Father (Bonaventure) Armengol to place with Rousselon at (Odin's) disposal. He has been told that the house of Benoist and Hackey have ceased operations; these gentlemen have (Odin's) small funds and he does not dare give an order on them before knowing the state of affairs. $150 remains to be paid October 1 and $150 January 1 for the house (Odin) has bought. If Rousselon sees Armengol he is to tell him not to fail to give him this amount.

V-4-m A.L.S. (French) 2pp. 4to.
3


1842 Sep

Collins, T.W.
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

To Bishop Antoine Blanc
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

Last evening after Blanc had received the resignation of Father (Stephen) Rousselon, curate of the Cathedral of St. Louis, Collins carried, at Blanc's request, to the lay-wardens of that church, a letter from Blanc informing them that the cure having again become vacant, Blanc had appointed Father (Constantine) Maenhaut to that place. The wardens were dissatisfied with the letter which indicated that the appointment was made in consequence of Rousselon's withdrawal and that Blanc did not seem to contemplate the right of approval or rejection on their part. The wardens have passed a series of resolutions approving the appointment but asserting their right of approval or rejection and taking the appointment as supplying the place of Father (Louis) Moni. Over their course in this particular, Blanc has no control, nor does their action deprive Blanc of any right. Collins may safely assert that Blanc has given the parish a curate who will give universal satisfaction and at the same time Blanc has saved the principle for which he contends for he has never yielded the right of conferring the cure of the church of St. Louis to whomsoever he thought the most worthy. So far as individual preferences are concerned all difficulties are now at an end.

V-4-m A.L.S. 3pp. 4to.
5


1842 Sep 1

Delegorgue
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

To Father (Napoleon Joseph Perché?
New Orleans, Louisiana)

As a partisan of the cause (Perché?) is defending so logically, Delegorgue informs him of the provisions of the law which contradict those advanced by the trustees that the pastor must be an American citizen. Article 101(?) of the civil code requires only that to perform marriages the minister be a resident. It is absurd to invoke laws of other countries.

V-4-m A.L.S. 1p. 4to.
1


1842 Sep 1

Kenrick, Peter Richard, Coadjutor Bishop of St. Louis St. Louis, Missouri

to Bishop John Baptist Purcell
of Cincinnati, Ohio

He takes the opportunity of Father (Charles) Bogliolie's departure to send another letter. He congratulates Purcell upon the acquisition of the Vincentians for his seminary, since they have most of the seminaries of the U.S. He also congratulates Purcell on the acquisition of Fathers Bogliolie and (Francis) Burlando, C.M. He also envies Purcell the acquisition of Father John P. Emig, S.J. and Father P. Mignard, S.J. Father Timon has been sick but Kenrick hopes that he will be able to give Purcell's retreat. He asks Purcell if he has noticed the controversy about the Derby reprints. Father Timon will, if Purcell suggests, tell of Kenrick's plans on this. He outlines a plan whereby with the aid of the Cincinnati book society, a book like "The End of Controversy" could be printed at a cost of 18 cents and sold for 25 cents, himself offering to take 1000 and Timon 500. Father Timon suggests a stock-jobbing company but Kenrick does not agree with him. Thinks that such a book would have been handy in the riots. Purcell's Cincinnati Tracts cost twice as much as they should as he showed Mr. Conahan last spring. He asks Purcell to consider the problem.

II-4-h A.L.S. 3pp. 8vo.
8


1842 Sep 2

(Blanc), Bishop Ant(hony)
N(ew) O(rleans, Louisiana)

To Father (Napoleon Joseph) Perché
(New Orleans, Louisiana)

(Blanc) believes it would be better for Perché not to reply anymore to his anonymous antagonist. (Blanc) would rather have him draw up a report about the whole affair of the appointment of a pastor at St. Louis (Cathedral), collecting all the proceedings of the trustees and their demands for a vote in the election of a bishop and pastors. This could appear in a form of a pamphlet.

V-4-m A.L.S. (French) 2pp. 8vo.
2


1842 Sep 3

Butler, Father Thomas r.
Lockport, Ohio

to Bishop John Baptist Purcell
of Cincinnati, Ohio

Arriving from St. Mary's and the deep cut, he found Purcell's letter. It is too late for him to go to Dayton. He suggests that Father (Daniel) Hallinan be sent ahead or accompany the bishop on his visit to prepare those who have not been prepared for confirmation. He has notified Father Hertzog and Navarron that Purcell will be at Munster September 15. He has had great difficulty getting the children prepared because they are so uncultivated, but there will be a large number of adults to be confirmed. He speaks in detail of the progress of Temperance and names some who have taken the pledge. Mr. Brownell invites Purcell to stay at his house. He asks Purcell to bring medals etc. for the large number of temperance converts, including some reserved cases. He will make arrangements for Purcell's visits to Piqua, Lockport, Munster, and St. Mary's. At Jacksonville if Father (Louis) Navarron should have any ready could be visited on the way to Dayton. During this time Father Hallinan could have all ready at Dayton. He will write to Hallinan that Purcell will most likely call for him.
II-4-h A.L.S. 3pp. 8vo.
9


1842 Sep 3

McLaughlin, Father Peter
Cleveland, Ohio

to Bishop John Baptist Purcell
of Cincinnati, Ohio

Unwilling to leave Purcell uneasy about the church at St. Mary's he writes him that he has consulted his lawyers, Bolten and Kelly, who had carpenters appraise the pews. Their price was $416 but not in McLaughlin's name. He has promised to pay if the business is transacted in his name, but Mrs. Golden will not accept anything in his name. As soon as he gets out of this circle he will pay since he can pay $200 the first Monday in November and the rest when her lawyers demand it. As to the lady mentioned by Purcell he has nothing to say except that while he fears nothing that she can say or swear he fears to displease Purcell. He has just returned from a visit to Father Joseph P. Machebeuf's church at Sandusky City and praises his progress and zeal. Speaks also of Father J.L. Gleizal. He speaks about Father Purcell and his Jesuit companion. He speaks of a few he has visited in Randolph and Liverpool. The Irish at Medina will not visit the log church. He goes Thursday to Painsville. He speaks also of the Catholics at Cuyahoga Falls and Youngstown.

II-4-h A.L.S. 3pp. 8vo.
12


1842 Sep 4

Armstrong, Geo(rge)
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

Evariste Blanc will feel obliged to one of the Reverend Gentlemen of Rampart Street Church to baptize the Negro child of his slave Celeste.

V-4-m A.D.S. 1p. 32mo.
1


1842 Sep 5

De Pouilly, J(ea)n and Ev. Goudchaux
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

Receipt for 120 piastres from Father E(tienne) Rousselon for repairs on the Ursulines' church.

V-4-m A. Receipt S. 1p. 16mo.
3


1842 Sep 6

Ascensio, Father Felipe, Father C(onstantine) Maenhaut, Father B(ernard) Permoli, Father J(ames) I(gnatius) Mullon, Father E(tienne) Rousselon, Father A(ngelo) Mascaroni, Father Napoleon Joseph Perché, Father J.M.A. Bonniot, Father E(dward) D'Hauw, Father (J.?) Raviol
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

Protest os the clergy of New Orleans against a certain passage in the letter signed Father M(atthew) B(ernard) Anduze published in the "Bee" of the 3rd inst. The passage respecting the ecclesiastical meeting convened by Bishop (Anthony) Blanc on August 23 calls for their attention. They protest against the term "kidnaping"; against the insinuations in the words "Everything was ready, each had his part"; against the assertion that Anduze's answer produced any "marked sensation." They deny that speaking upon Rousselon's appointment, Anduze rested his arguments on "texts." Anduze violently required of D'Hauw to explain what he called personalities and Anduze was called to order by the Bishop.
P.S. Fathers (James) Lesne and (Claude) Lunel being absent from town are prevented signing and Fathers Lesne and (V.) Plunkett not having been present at the meeting, are unable to certify. (There is also a second copy of this in French which does not include the names of the signers.)

V-4-m Copies (one in French) 4pp. Folio
15


1842 Sep 6

Gale, Levi H.
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

Receipt for $2.90 from Bishop (Anthony) Leblanc(!) for freight from Havre on the Vandalia.
Signed by C. Fassy(?).

V-4-m Receipt 1p. 32mo.
2


1842 Sep 6

Gale, Levi H.
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

A receipt for $2.28 from Father (Stephen) Rousselon for freight from Havre on the Vandalia.
Signed by C. Fassy(?).

V-4-m Receipt 1p. 32mo.
2


1842 Sep 8

(Flaget) B(enedict) J(oseph), Bishop of Louisville
(New York, New York?)

To Bishop (Anthony) Blanc
New Orleans, Louisiana

(Flaget) introduces Mr. and Mrs. Phelhorn with whom he made the trip from Havre to New York. They are going to New Orleans to escape the rigors of winter and restore their health.

V-4-m A.L.S. (French) 2pp. 4to.
2


1842 Sep 8

Jesse, A( ) de, President of the Council
(Lyons, France)

To Bishop (Peter Paul Lefevere) of Zela
(Detroit, Michigan)

The anxieties Lefevere expresses in his letter of July 29 rest on a mistake of fact which fortunately the Council can easily clear up. Perhaps a letter from the treasurer at Paris, who is charged with remitting to Lefevere the sum allocated for the current year, has already calmed his anxiety by making known this sum. Fearing the treasurer did not write him, the Council, completing its own letter of July 14 which did not give the figure of the allocation, hastens to tell him it is 53,200 francs. In view of the Association of the Propagation's enormous responsibilities and short resources compared to the greatness of the needs, Lefevere will realize that the sum granted him proves that the councils speak not only of their vital interest in h is diocese but also of their considering it among the first rank among the missions to be aided abundantly. Lefevere's mistake proceeds from his not knowing the way the councils make their annual allotments. Jesse will explain it to him. The allocations are determined in advance and are chargeable against the funds for the current year. They have not yet been received at the time they are allotted. As soon as they reach the central treasuries they are sent out to the missions in the determined proportions. When Lefevere first wrote the council nearly a year ago the allotting for 1841 had already been made. The 6,600 francs granted to Detroit was an extraordinary decision made in consideration of the pressing needs Lefevere has told of. It was in addition to the annual allocations in attending the last distribution, of 1842. "The number 10,600 francs noted in the May quarterly of 1842 indicated a sum sent in 1841, the same number as the account included in the issue of May 1843 will relate, to a time when very probably the 53,200 francs concerned voted in 1842 will be in Lefevere's hands." The Council speaks only in probabilities. Lefevere will realize that the allocation of which it informs him will not be immediately payable. Mr. Choiselot, treasurer of the Council of Paris, has charge of making payments. He will take care to send Lefevere his sum in whole or in part as soon as possible. Jesse will hasten to write Choiselot so that consideration of the circumstances of the missions will persuade him to regulate his payments in accordance. Jesse asks Lefevere to believe in the desire the council shows of helping him as much as the state of his diocese requires. The Council laments the meagerness of the resources with which it tries to meet the needs of so many missions at one end of the world or the other. Jesse asks that they join in praying God to increase the friends for the propagation of His Kingdom on earth.

III-2-g L.S. (French) 3pp. 8vo.
2


1842 Sep 12

(Chanche), Bishop John Joseph
Natchez, (Mississippi)

To Bishop (Anthony) Blanc
(New Orleans, Louisiana)

(Chanche) is distressed at the part which Father (Matthew Bernard) Anduze has taken in Blanc's unfortunate affair. Anduze's letter is an unfortunate production; it shows that his heart is sore from disappointment. (Chanche) regrets too that the election has gone against Blanc. Who is it that the trustees want for their curate. Anduze would be out of the question; it cannot be Father (Constantine) Maenhaut since he is likely to accept the bishopric of Santo Domingo. Father (Napoleon Joseph) Perché would have met with the same opposition as Father (Stephen) Rousselon. The appeal to the government of the United States will meet with no response. (John) Tyler is rather favorably inclined to their institutions; so is (Hugh Swinton) Legaré, the attorney general, and so, of course, is (Roger Brooke) Taney. It is a pity that Blanc cannot at this time try their claims to trusteeism. Another priest has come to (Chanche), Father (Guillaume) Labbé; it was he who accompanied Bishop (Charles Forbin de) Janson, in his missions in Canada. (Chanche) intends to send him on the coast at Pascagoula, Bay St. Louis, etc. to spend a few months or longer if he can succeed in building a church. He is ardent, he will learn English in the meantime and then (Chanche) will send him in the interior; he wants a good priest for Jackson. (Chanche) cannot explain Bishop (Michael) Portier's silence; he is waiting his advice to send a priest to Paulding. (Chanche) is embarrassed to keep the workmen going with the church. If Blanc cannot make any
arrangements with Portier or Mr. Lesne to satisfy him now, if Blanc could mention it (Chanche) might borrow in Natchez with more facility.
V-4-m A.L.S. 4pp. 4to.
13


1842 Sep 12

Whitney, S. and J.P.
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

Receipt for $4.90 from Father (Stephen) Rousselon for freight from Havre on the Rubicon.
Signed by C. Wyman.

V-4-m Receipt 1p. 32mo.
2


1842 Sep 13

L(ynch), Anne C.
Providence, (Rhode Island)

To O(restes) A. Brownson
Boston, Massachusetts

It has been impossible for her to leave home, for her mother was in Connecticut. She was expecting friends, also, and not knowing when they were to come. Then, too, she still expects her former pupil. The past week has been busy and gay, it being commencement. She could not help contrasting it with the one of three years ago. The contrast was more striking due to the discourse on American literature by Dr. Barry, which was as commonplace and tame as it could well be. She thinks the conservatives the real infidels for their want of faith in providence. She says that she shall miss the "Quarterly" after it has been married to the "Democratic Review."

I-3-f A.L.S. 3pp. 8vo.
1


1842 Sep 13

Murphy, John
Baltimore, (Maryland)

To Bishop (Anthony) Blanc
New Orleans, L(ouisian)a

On the preceding page Blanc has the bill of lading and Murphy's bill for Blanc's order of April 5, 1842. He has added books of the Cabinet Library, a series of juvenile books. Should Blanc approve, Murphy would be pleased to have Blanc call the attention of the Catholic bookseller in New Orleans to them. The books would have been sent much sooner but there was no vessel for Blanc's port.
A.L.S.

On the same paper:

--------
1842 Sep 12

Gordon, Geo(rge)
Baltimore, (Maryland)

To Bishop (Anthony) Blanc
New Orleans, L(ouisian)a
Bill of lading on the barque "Mary" for one box of books.
Bill S.

On the same paper:

--------
1842 Sep 10

Murphy, John
Baltimore, (Maryland)

to Bishop (Anthony) Blanc
(New Orleans, Louisiana)

Bill for $100.37 for books.

A. Bill

V-4-m A.L.S. Bill S. / A. Bill 3pp. 4to.
2


1842 Sep 13

O'Sullivan, J(ohn) L.
New York, (New York)

To (O(restes) A. Brownson
Boston, Massachusetts)

He is not surprised that Brownson is vexed at the proofs. The printer says that nine-tenths of the errors are variations from the copy. He hopes to receive the next number from Brownson as early as convenient for him. Not later than October 1st, he asks. The subject is agreeable to him and topical, timely. He hopes soon to see Brownson in Boston.
(P.S.) Messrs. Langley are getting out an extra October number (of "Democratic Review)" to be sent out with Brownson's last number that month. They are to be sent to the subscribers to let them see what they are getting. He wants to know at what time they ought to be in Boston for that purpose. He leaves it to Brownson to say what he wants in his own valedictory, but suggests that he try to promote the idea of the subscribers coming over en masse to the new transfer.

I-3-f A.L.S. 2pp. 8vo.
2


1842 Sep 13

Van Cott, J.W.
New York, New York

to O(restes) A. Brownson
Boston, Massachusetts

The Lecture Committee of the Hamilton Literary Association of the city of Brooklyn invites Brownson to give one of the lectures. Governor (William Henry) Seward is to open it in November, and is to be followed by Brownson's townsmen, (Richard Henry) Dana and (George) Bancroft. Lecturers are paid $50.00 for a single lecture. If it is Brownson's disposition to accept the offer, they will be greatly obliged. He asks Brownson what Thursday evening after the date of December 22nd, will be most convenient for him.

I-3-f A.L.S. 2pp. 8vo.
4


1842 Sep 14

(Odin), Bishop John Mary
Galveston, (Texas)

to Bishop A(nthony) Blanc
New Orleans, L(ouisian)a

(Odin) received Blanc's letter of August 25. Blanc's troubles afflict (Odin) greatly. Who would ever have believed that the trustees would push their insolence so far? No doubt the excellent choice Blanc has made to fill the important post of his cathedral is displeasing to the devil. (Odin) had a bilious fever for ten days but feels his strength returning every day. The jubilee has produced some fruit at Galveston; however there are many Catholics especially among the French, Italian, and Spanish who are still indifferent. In two or three weeks (Odin) will give a little retreat at Houston and along the Brazos. After the sickness season, (Odin) thinks he will ask Father (John) Timon to send him one or two priests. It is impossible for him to take care of the spiritual needs of this part of the country. There are a number of Catholics along the Trinity and Neches whom he has not yet visited. Last Friday a thief took 18 or 20 piastres and some linens from his dresser; he is without a dime. The continual rains for two months make them fear the yellow fever.

V-4-m A.L.S. (French) 3pp. 4to.
3


1842 Sep 15

B(ayley), James R(oosevelt)
Paris, (France)

To Catherine Seton care of William A. Bailey, Esq. New York, (New York)

He thanks her for her kind letter at a time when he needed comfort. He had the support of conscience and the convictions of duty, still, he was in a strange land. The other letters he received bore "the impress of abated love." He was happy upon reading her letter to find one at least of his kin who was appreciative of the blessing he had been granted and who could join him in thanking God. The change he made has not brought any regrets, but only religious consolations and new happiness. Now he understands the "much feared proselytism of the Latin Church" for he has been animated with the desire to bring others not merely to think like himself but to enjoy the same blessings as he does. It is the proselytism of St. Andrew who brought his brother to Christ. Reading the tracts of the Fathers he used to lament that what was once the "Spouse of Christ" now seemed so desolate and divided, and to dream of a union among its scattered parts. He did not realize that he had been taught to believe a lie, that the ark of peace still floated on the world. He can hardly comprehend why he has been taken into the Church when so many more worthy are left in error. St. Augustine, in his care, refers the gift to Providence. Of course there were his holy mother's prayers. Bailey wonders if the prayers of Catherine's mother (Elizabeth Seton) did not play a like part in his own conversion. Patrick Felicci in a letter he received from him at Rome, has referred the blessing to the same source. The prayers of the righteous on earth avail much, more so those of the saints in heaven. He has been remembering of late, and has been helped to remember by her letter, something regrettable, that he bestowed irregular baptism on one of her brother William's children, though it is valid in the churches eyes. It is important that these children should grow up to the realization of the blessings of their Catholic inheritance. He supposes it is impossible for them to have a Catholic tutor. Their mother would never think of allowing them to go to school abroad. If she would he knows one run by a Sulpician in the Suburbs of Paris where they would be made Christians as well as scholars. He would love to be the means under God's of bringing many of his dear ones in to the fold. At present he can only pray and offer the sacrifice for them. He hopes they will be given the grace to enter and will bless the day that made him a "wonderer." He is at the Sulpician Summer house at Igry. They return to the Seminary October 10 for a solemn retreat of eight days. He will offer it for his family's conversion and asks her to pray for the same intention. He thinks he is wise in not returning to America immediately though he would like to tell his family of his treasure. He trusts these matters to God. He put off the delivery of the letter she gave him for a Miss Fisher in Paris, so long that at last, leaving without putting it in the Post Office, he destroyed it. His note of introduction is worth nothing without it. He asks if it would do any good to call on Miss Fisher. He wonders what the Quaker would say about a man in a cassock frequenting his house. Catherine's account of the "young would be divine" reminds him of "looking one way and rowing another." There are many like him loving and seeking truth with their heads rather than their hearts. There are not a few of these spirits in the English church and "her not very loving child" in America who long for the expressive beauty of the Latin rite and think they can graft it into their withered and separated branch. He mourns for them. They should pray for one another and those they love. His duties call him from this letter. She knows he is "in all sincerity and truth." P.S. He will save until opportunity affords the account of his trip through Italy and Rome, "full of faith and good works.: He made friends there. Lord Clifford has been in England for the past year. Father Glover is infirm with the gout, an old ailment for a Jesuit. He believes she understands where he is and why. His first inclination was to join an order but now he believes he should return to America to work among his flock. He wrote his Bishop from Paris asking for instructions. He hopes the Bishop will let him remain where he is for a year. Notwithstanding miserable Spain, Catholicism in Europe has brightening prospects. Her enemy is indifference. He asks her to write him about herself and the Church. His love to Aunt and Father and all. May God protect them.

II-l-d A.L.S. 4pp. 8vo.
4


1842 Sep 15

Daron, Cha(rle)s J.
(New Orleans, Louisiana)

To Father E(tienne) Rousselon
(New Orleans, Louisiana)

Payments to customs for Bishop (Anthony) Blanc and
Rousselon. Expenditures for Father (Joseph) Cretin; also a subscription to the Dublin Review for Bishop (John Mary) Odin, (C.M.), and a subscription to the Tablet for Blanc; (added in Rousselon's hand?) $29 for Father (Napoleon Joseph) Perché's second letter to L'Abeille; $2 paid to Mr. Deshays(?).

V-4-m A. Receipt (French) 2pp. 8vo.
6


1842 Sep 14

Gaux and Troxelair
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

Receipt for $50 from Father (Stephen) Rousselon for work on the Ordo for 1843.

V-4-m A. Receipt S. (French) 1p. 12mo.
2


1842 Sep 15

New Orleans, First Municipality
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

To Father (Stephen) Rousselon
(New Orleans, Louisiana)

Notice is given to have the weeds cut along the path to the chapel at the corner of St. Claude and Bayou. (The name of) E. Crevon as commissioner of the Third District (is written in the margin). (The signatures are indecipherable).

V-4-m Notice S. (French) 1p. 16mo.
2


1842 Sep 15

Timon, (Father) J(ohn)
St. Louis, (Missouri)

To (Bishop Peter Paul Lefevere)
(Detroit, Michigan)

Col(onel) (Pierre) Menard spoke to Timon of an affair which may be of some advantage to Lefevere. Mr. Felix Valeé made the exact copy of the original documents in the hands of Menard. Timon encloses them. Menard's power of attorney is null by the death of Father (Gabriel) Richard, but all that is needed is to invest him with legal powers and to send the patents. Lefevere knows the character of Menard to be assured that he risks nothing in confiding powers to him. Timon congratulates Lefevere on the great good God has done through his ministry in the (Detroit) diocese.

II-2-g A.L.S. 1p. 8vo.
4


1842 Sep 17

(Blanc), Anthony, Bishop of New Orleans
New Orleans, Louisiana

to Bishop John Baptist Purcell
of Cincinnati, Ohio

Their correspondence has languished fro some cause. He himself has taken up with the various affairs. Purcell should know of his difficulty with the Marguillers (Trustees) of the Cathedral. His anxiety has been the more severe because he has had no reason to expect such things, and because of another affair. He speaks of the difficulties that beset his path and the care he must exercise to succeed here. He mentions the things that have been said about him in the papers, etc., as a guard against becoming proud. The marguillers stand condemned by all thinking men. Some of their friends seeking to prevent a greater evil have proposed a mediation by three appointed by them and three named by Blanc. He accepted finally the resignation of Father (Stephen) Rousselon, and named Father (Charles) Maenhaut to succeed him. They wrote that they accepted the nomination but that they preserved their rights (Having written to the Holy See). Father Maenhaut entered upon his duties today, and last evening three of the Marguillers called to find out when he would be established. He does not expect cordial relations with them. In appointing Father Rousselon he did not expect cordial relations with them. In appointing Father Rousselon he did not expect such difficulties. He could not have nominated Father Maenhaut at the time because he has received other messages from the Prefect of the Propaganda. If Father Maenhaut was called away by Rome today he would make the change again according to these heads. Asks Purcell not to publish these matters in the papers but merely to say that Father Rousselon resigning he has appointed Father Maenhaut in his place. (Letter is quite illegible in places).
II-4-h A.L.S. 3pp. 12mo. (French)
5


1842 Sep 19

Martin, Father G(iles) F.
St. Martinville, (Louisiana)

To Father (Stephen) Rousselon
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

Martin intended not to write until he could send the money he owes but since nothing comes in, not even his salary, he cannot settle his debt. His affliction is nothing compared to the storm around (Bishop Anthony Blanc). One of Martin's trustees told him of (Blanc's) choice of a successor to Father (Louis) Moni. The Bishop does not need the support of the priests but if he did he would never lack it. Martin would have no liking for a Constitutional Church, even one of desire. These good gentlemen do not want foreign priests. Why doesn't Blanc take them at their word and ordain them and let them serve the Church gratuitously. How Martin would like to see (E.A.) Canon as pastor of St. James; (W.F.C.) Duplessis as pastor of Attakapas. He is joking but he dreads a schism. They share the Bishop's pains. He has learned that both Rousselon's and the Bishop's health has suffered which does not surprise him.

V-4-m A.L.S. (French) 4pp. 4to.
5


1842 Sep 19

(Odin), Bishop John Mary
Galveston, (Texas)

to Bishop A(nthony) Blanc
New Orleans, L(ouisian)a

They spent a disastrous night. For several days the wind from the east was so strong it pushed the tide up into the streets. Last night the wind changed to the north and caused great damage. All the buildings on the bay were considerably damaged except two; today the street are impassable. (Odin's) church was moved ten feet off its foundation. Fortunately no one was killed. His house stood up well against the storm. His means do not allow him to build a new church; after this disaster he cannot count on the people. The loss is nothing in itself but the interruption of services will bring back indifference among many who had returned to their duties.

V-4-m A.L.S. (French) 3pp. 12mo.
2


1842 Sep 20

(Chanche), Bishop John Joseph
Natchez, (Mississippi)

To Bishop (Anthony) Blanc
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

(Chanche) expected an answer to his last letter today. He has engagements to meet and if Blanc cannot give him $2000 now, he is to say when he can and (Chanche) will be able to get it in Natchez on that expectation. (Chanche) sees nothing more concerning Blanc's affairs in the papers. He hopes this indicates something like a better disposition on the part of the trustees.

V-4-m A.L.S. 2pp. 4to.
1


1842 Sep 20

Gaux and Company
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

To (Bishop Anthony Blanc
New Orleans, Louisiana)

Receipted bill for $148 for 350 Ordos for 1843.

V-4-m A. Receipt S. (French) 2pp. 12mo.
1


1842 Sep 21

Harper, H.L.
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

Harper gives permission to his slave Betsy to be baptized by a Catholic priest of St. Louis Cathedral.

V-4-m A.D.S. (French) 1p. 32mo.
0


1842 Sep 21

(Portier), Bishop Michael
M(obile, Alabama)

To Bishop A(nthony) Blanc
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

(Portier) learns with real pleasure that Blanc's difficulties will come to an end. He does not think anyone dreams of blaming Blanc and, as Blanc says, the principle is saved. As (Portier) has seen only one newspaper from New Orleans since the beginning of the trouble, he only knows snatches and rumors about the state of things. Blanc's pastoral was very well written except for some expressions, very true but too harsh for some. He is afraid of the measure taken against Father (Matthew Bernard) Anduze. However false his position, (Portier) fears that taking away his powers and abolishing the office of theologian is, to the public, a punishment which has the look of revenge; this will rekindle the wrath of the trustees. (Portier) sees that he has his good share of abuse and that they have horribly distorted his sentiments and the approval he has given to Blanc's views. Does the piece that appeared in the Courier of the U(nited) S(tates) merit a denial? (In the margin): He has written to Bishop (John Joseph) Chanche.
V-4-m A.L.S. (French) 2pp. 4to.
3


1842 Sep 22

Aliquot, Marie Jeanne
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

Aliquot will let the money go to the establishment three-fourths of the year as desired; the first year without interest, the other years at 8 per cent.

V-4-m A.D.S. (French) 1p. 32mo.
0


1842 Sep 22

Beauprez, Father P(ierre) F(rancois)
Pointe Coupée, (Louisiana)

To Father (Stephen Rousselon
New Orleans, Louisiana)

Beauprez received the altar stone. It seems that the discussion concerning Rousselon's appointment as pastor of St. Louis (Cathedral) has calmed down since the trustees appealed to the court of Rome. (Rousselon) is to let him know if he got rid of Beauprez's notes on Municipality No. 3 or not when they would be discounted at 20 per cent. He asks (Rousselon) to ask Father (Joseph) Billon if he has carried out Beauprez's commission at Attakapas.

V-4-m A.L.S. (French) 2pp. 8vo.
3


1842 Sep 24

Vicari, Hermann de, Archbishop-elect of Freiburg in Brisgau Freiburg in Brisgau, (Germany)

To Bishop (Peter Paul Lefevere)
(Detroit, Michigan)

Vicari and his clergy received Lefevere's letters of July 29, 1842, and perceived from them that Lefevere greatly desired to be more certain of the morals of the priest Anton Seitz and the discharge he received from Vicari. He left Vicari as a priest named Francis Anton Seitz, former parish priest of Than(n)heim in the Hohenzollern- Hechingen principality, in April, 1833. He accepted the testimonials and letters of dismissal. Vicari attaches a copy of them so that from them Lefevere may see that Seitz lead a decent, commendable life in Vicari's diocese. Vicari asks God to grant Lefevere many joys in the Lord and many workers for Christ's vineyard who will propagate the faith, morals, and discipline of the Catholic Church. Respects.
1833 Apr 26

( ) Bernard, Vicar General
(Freiburg im) Breisgau

to All who see, read or hear this document

Francis Anton Seitz from Hechingen and parish priest in Thannheim expressed to the Vicar his desire to leave the Archdiocese and go to the United States for the sake of a better fortune. He asked the Vicar to grant him discharges. The Vicar accedes to this request and attests that Francis Anton Seitz, of moral character, is entangled in no excommunication, suspension, interdict, ecclesiastical penalty, irregularity, or other canonical impediment. While in the Archdiocese of Freiburg Seitz led a life decent in morals and conversation proper to clerics and devoted himself zealously to the care of souls. Wherefore the Vicar grants Seitz the license and discharge to subject himself to some bishop in the United States. In testimony of this the Vicar writes this document and attaches to it the Archiepiscopal seal.

III-2-g L.S. 4pp. 8vo.
2


1842 Sep 26

Armengol, Father B(onaventure)
Assumption, (Louisiana)

To Father (Stephen) Rousselon
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

Bishop (Anthony) Blanc in his letter of the 14th told Rousselon to draw on Armengol for 200 piastres from the deposit of Father (Charles F.) Moracchini. This amount if to be paid to Captain Streck. (A note on the letter states that) Streck was paid September 29.
V-4-m A.L.S. (French) 2pp. 4to.
4


1842 Sep 26

Bliss, Zenas
Jericho Center, V(ermon)t

to O(restes) A. Brownson
Boston, Massachusetts

Although a stranger, he is acquainted with many of Brownson's writings. The latter's letters to W(illiam) E. Channing have prompted him to write. He knows that Brownson is a sincere searcher after truth, but feels that the doctrine in Brownson's letter reveals only part of the great, whole truth. It is inadequate to believe merely that, in regard to Christ as our spiritual life, the objective life controls and determines the subjective, when it is the subjective that always makes the objective what it is for us. The two must really be one. If the objective is divine, so too must the subjective; if one human, also must the other be human. This is essential to the strength and fullness of the truth. He also disagrees with Brownson's views on human nature and its
improvement. He, himself, regards nature as evil, and that it does not really become good, but that we are, rather, delivered from it or gain the victory over it. Brownson may use this letter any way he deems best for the promotion of truth, even to publishing it.

I-3-f A.L.S. 4pp. 8vo.
1


1842 Sep 26

(Chanche), Bishop John Joseph
Natchez, (Mississippi)

To Bishop (Anthony) Blanc
New Orleans, L(ouisian)a

(Chanche) received Blanc's letter of the 23rd this morning. He had received that of the 18th a few days ago. (Chanche) can get the money in Natchez by giving an order on Blanc and this he will be obliged to do tomorrow. He will make his order for December 1 and in two months Blanc and Mr. Lesne and Bishop (Michael) Portier can manage to raise the $2000 and the interest for two months. (Chanche) received a letter from Portier this morning which was very unsatisfactory. When (Chanche) was in New Orleans, Blanc said it would oblige him to let him hold the money as it enabled Blanc to obtain facilities from the bank which were necessary in building his new church. When (Chanche) was going to Mobile Blanc said he had made arrangements with Portier and that Portier would pay him. But Portier did not think it proper to give the money and the matter dropped. (Chanche) is sorry to learn that Blanc's health has been so much affected by all the distressing occurrences.

V-4-m A.L.S. 4pp. 4to.
3


1842 Sep 28

LeBlanc, A., Jr.
Pointe Coupée, (Louisiana)

To Bishop A(nthony) Blanc
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

A former pupil of Blanc's school asks a favor of him. Being about to marry a cousin, LeBlanc asks for a dispensation. If details are necessary he will reply immediately; the date of the marriage is not fixed.

V-4-m A.L.S. (French) 2pp. 4to.
1


1842 Sep 30

Baraga, (Father) Frederick
Lapointe, (Wisconsin)

To Bishop (Peter Paul) Lefevere
Detroit, Michigan

Father Baraga received the Bishop's letter of August 21 on September 16. It has given him great consolation to learn of the zeal of the Bishop's congregation during the 10 days retreat, but it grieves him to think that his own little congregation, especially the Canadians, make such little efforts to obtain the Indulgences which the Holy Church offers and of which he preaches so often. The Indians are much more zealous. Almost all of those who go to Holy Communion have fulfilled the conditions prescribed by the Holy Father and hope to gain the Plenary Indulgence. From Mr. (Gabriel) Cotte, Baraga had heard that the Bishop intends to visit him next summer. He begs him to do so about August 1st, because at that time the members of his mission are almost all present. Many have to go away to find a better livelihood during the year. He also begs the Bishop to bring along the circulars about temperance in French, because he wants to found a Temperance Society. He would also like to have the Catholic Almanac of 1842 and 1843.

III-2-g A.L.S. (French) 2pp.
2


1842 Sep 30

Kenrick, Peter Richard, Coadjutor Bishop of St. Louis St. Louis, Missouri

to Bishop John Baptist Purcell
of Cincinnati, Ohio

He acknowledges two letters of Purcell and sends what information about Father (Henry) Meinkman. Father (P)
Verhaegen says that he had been at Washington and Martinsville (Missouri) where rumors and his want of character caused him to leave. Because calumny was suggested in the case Kenrick called him to St. Louis. At the suggestion of Father Verhaegen and Father (Ferdinand) Helias he gave him another chance But as he could not get along with neighboring pastors he was not useful and Kenrick gave him his exeat. The little seminary is still in embryo but is progressing. He feels that he might take in youths from other diocese, in time, and thinks that he may need a separate German seminary. He hopes that Father John Timon, C.M. has convinced him about the matter of publishing the "End of Controversy in cheap editions. He argues against the eastern publishers, and praises the Cincinnati book society. He wonders if Father Edward Purcell is translating the Vie de Calvin. Father O'Connor of Pittsburgh has suggested Father Dean as translator. Speaks of other books and translations. He hopes that Purcell will be able to support his seminary, but admits that he trusts to Providence to support his own. Mentions the Telegraph's criticism of the N.Y. Tablet. He met some of Purcell's Cincinnati converts at Quincy, (Illinois). Bishop Blanc of New Orleans has a difficult time. He understands that Father (Stephen) Rousselon has resigned and that Father (Charles) Maenhaut has been appointed in his place. Bishop Hughes of New York is having a hard time but Kenrick believes that he will succeed.

II-4-h A.L.S. 4pp. 8vo.
16


1842 Oct 1

De Hailandière, Celestine, Bishop of Vincennes
Vincennes, Indiana

to Bishop John Baptist Purcell
of Cincinnati, Ohio

Rev. (Joseph) Ferneding has left the diocese of Vincennes and gone to Cincinnati to live. De Hailandière feels it his duty to demand that he return if not to his congregation at least to the diocese. If priests can leave at will, the administration of his diocese would be rendered impossible. He hopes that Purcell will not give him a parish in his diocese.

II-4-h A.L.S. 2pp. 8vo. (French)
3


1842 Oct 2

Bayon, J.A.
New Orleans, Louisiana

A list of names of subscribers to the Propagateur (Catholique) for the second half year.

V-4-m A. List S. (French) 2pp. Folio
1


1842 Oct 3

Aliquot, Jeanne Marie
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

To Barthélemi Jourdan
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

Aliquot makes her will as follows. She names Jourdan her universal heir so that at her death he can dispose of her property.
A.L.S.

Enclosure:

--------
1842 Oct 3

Aliquot, Jeanne Marie
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

To Barthélemi Jourdan
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

The establishment for colored girls, the Convent of St. Claude, which Aliquot has sold to the Ursulines, owes her 1000 piastres; she leaves it without interest to September 8, 1843, after that at 8 percent for two years. If it is not settled before her death she wishes Jourdan to settle it in a friendly way, and not wish a law suit unless the 1000 piastres are not paid. Jean Louis Dolliole owes her 260 piastres, endorsed by his brother Joseph. Mr. Erié (Errié) owes her 100 piastres; his note is endorsed by his stepfather, Dolliole. Miss Arsène Aubruy owes her 150 piastres. Louis Chenau owes her 50 piastres. Mrs. Charbonnet owes her 50 piastres, Mrs. Dupuy, Charbonnet's aunt, owes her 50 piastres. Mrs. Charbonnet was Miss Soniat Dufossa.
Copy (? French) 2pp.

V-4-m A.L.S. and Copy (? French) 4pp. 8vo. & Folio
10


1842

Bailey, James Roosevelt, Seminary of St. Sulpice
Issy, (France)

To Doctor Quackenboss
Paris, (France)

Bailey has been laboring under an attack of the jaundice for about a week and as he could find no relief from the French physician connected with the establishment, he would like to see Dr. Quackenboss. If (George F.) Haskins who brings this letter does not find Quackenboss at home, the Doctor should take the omnibus to the Seminary. If he has any American newspapers, he should bring out one or two.

II-2-n A.L.S. 3pp. 16mo.
2


1842 Oct 3

(Blanc), Bishop Ant(hony)
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

To Father (Napoleon Joseph) Perché
(New Orleans, Louisiana)

In the painful circumstances in which they find themselves, God alone is their source of help. Perché is to add to the Mass the Collect "pro quacumque tribulatione" and to ask the faithful to pray for their intentions.

V-4-m A.L.S. (French) 1p. 8vo.
1


1842 Oct 5

Baraga, (Father) Frederick
(Lapointe, Wisconsin)

To (Bishop Peter Paul Lefevere)
Detroit, Michigan

A treaty has been made and signed yesterday in Lapointe in which $2000 are to be allowed for the schools. (Robert) Stuart, (the Indian agent) who made the treaty, came to see Baraga and gave him hope that something might also be done for a Catholic school. Baraga wrote to him in the morning the enclosed letter. Stuart answered that Baraga should write to his Bishop about it - Baraga encloses also that letter. He asks the Bishop to represent this matter to the Secretary of War in Washington, telling him that it is not fair to give all to the Protestants and nothing to the Catholics, especially as the Catholic Indians and half-breeds are just as numerical in strength as the Protestants on the land the government bought. If Baraga could obtain $300 it would suffice to keep a teacher. Baraga also asks to have the three (enclosed)books bound and to bring them next summer when the Bishop intends to come.

A.L.S. French 2pp.

(The enclosures are as follows:)

--------
1842 Oct 5

Baraga, (Father) Frederick
Lapointe, Wisconsin

to Mr. (Robert) Stuart (of the American Fur Company) (Lapointe, Wisconsin)

Baraga thanks Mr. Stuart for coming to him and proposing to appropriate a certain sum for schools and missions. As this sum is now appropriated, Baraga hopes that Stuart keeps his intention to give a share of this money to the Indian congregation as the Indians and half- breeds in his mission are more numerous than the Protestants. About $300 a year would please the Indians. Their chief is Buffalo's oldest son. Baraga and his congregation have always desired a Catholic school but could never afford to pay a teacher. He begs Mr. Stuart to consider his reasons which are fair and just and not inferior to those of his competitors. He trusts that the hopes which Mr. Stuart gave him will come through.
P.S. If Mr. Stuart could give some assurance, then Baraga would engage a good teacher from Detroit for next summer.

(Enclosures continued)

--------
1842

Stuart, Robert
Lapointe, (Wisconsin)

to Father (Frederick) Baraga
(Lapointe, Wisconsin)

He has received Baraga's note of March 3 and will try to see that justice is done in regard to the school money. Stuart will make a report to the Secretary of War who will make such decision as he deems just. The results will be made known to Bishop Lefevere to whom Baraga should communicate. Should the treaty be ratified, the teacher can be procured next spring. Stuart hopes that Baraga will be able to do much for the Indians.

III-2-g A.L.S. 1p. 8vo.
3


1842 Oct 5

(Chanche), Bishop John Joseph
Natchez, (Mississippi)

To Bishop (Anthony) Blanc
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

Is Blanc dis-spirited and broken hearted? He is to cheer up and nerve himself to meet the opposition. Blanc has already fought the good fight. (Chanche) hopes the last arrangements will secure tranquility. As for (Chanche's) little affair, he would have thought that even if he had called upon Blanc for $5000 Blanc would have exerted himself to get him out of the difficulty. Blanc is in a rich city, (Chanche) in a poor one; Blanc has means, (Chanche) has none. In Blanc's worry he has forgotten to say anything about Father (Albino) Desgaultière who wishes to join Blanc's diocese. Chanche also consulted Blanc about sending Father (Guillaume) L'abbé to give a mission on the coast at the Bay of St. Louis and Blanc has said nothing.

V-4-m A.L.S. 3pp. 4to.
3


1842 Oct 5

Kundig, Father Martin
Detroit, (Michigan)

To Mr. ( ) Meldrum
(Saginaw, Michigan)

Being absent from Detroit for four months on a mission in the Territory of Wisconsin, Kundig could not attend to Meldrum's letter. Upon his return he was informed of Mrs. Meldrum's coming to town. He visited her, having Saginaw on his mind since his mission there last spring. The prospect of beginning a church in Saginaw, and Meldrum's interest in it made Kundig anxious to address him. Bishop (Peter Paul Lefevere) is making arrangements in Detroit which will naturally extend through the diocese. They have been neglected but it will be different in the future. The Bishop will visit them next spring especially if they lay a foundation for the church in Saginaw. Kundig hopes the officers will continue to take interest and prove worthy. He asks how many families would move to Meldrum's quarters if a church were built in his neighborhood. (In Detroit papers).

III-2-g A.L.S. 3pp. 8vo.
3


1842 Oct 5

LeBeau and Charbonnet
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

H. Goudchaux and M. Garcia
(New Orleans, Louisiana)

Receipted bill for $244.57 for paint, linseed oil, etc. A receipt for $230.94 was given to Goudchaud and Garcia; $13.63 was put on the account of Father (Stephen) Rousselon.

V-4-m A. Receipt S. (French) 2pp. Folio
4


1842 Oct 5

O'Sullivan, J(ohn) L.
New York, (N.Y.)

To O(restes) A. Brownson
Boston, (Massachusetts)

An absence from the city has been the cause of his delay in answering Brownson's note. He prefers that Brownson write on any other subject than one containing the views referred to by his note. He regrets the bad taste in the publishers' invitation to Brownson's old subscribers to continue, attached to the "Democratic Review."
I-3-f A.L.S. 2PP. 8VO.
2


1842 Oct 7

Capen, N.

To O(restes) A. Brownson
Chelsea, (Massachusetts)

He introduces to Brownson B.A. Parnell Esq. Who proposes to deliver some lectures on Animal Magnetism as connected with Phrenology in Brownson's locality. He would like Brownson to see the experiments and then have his opinion on them.

I-3-f A.L.S. 1p. 12mo.
2 1842 Oct 8

(Eccleston), Archbishop Samuel
Baltimore, (Maryland)

To Bishop (Anthony) Blanc
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

Although he has been absent from the city for some time, (Eccleston) has not been inactive in regard to the shocking proceedings of the anti-Christian trustees of Blanc's cathedral. He wrote to Cardinal (Charles Januarius) Acton requesting him to put Cardinal (James Philip) Franzoni on his guard. He sent Acton the pamphlet of the trustees. He has examined his archives and has not found the document Blanc asks for. He has very little doubt that it is in the episcopal archives at St. Louis. Blanc has the sympathies and prayers of every Bishop and respectable clergyman and of thousands of good Catholics throughout the country. Blanc's firmness in not yielding to the schismatical usurpation of the trustees demands thanks and admiration. As to the substitution of Father (Constantine) Maenhaut for Father (Stephen) Rousselon, Blanc was the best judge. Judge (Roger Brooke) Taney is the only lawyer whom (Eccleston) would think it proper to consult about the case Blanc proposed in a former letter but (Eccleston) feels a delicacy as he believes it might come before the Supreme Court. He does not see any impropriety in Blanc writing to Taney and Blanc is at liberty to tell Taney that (Eccleston) will apprize Blanc of any oral communication Taney may have on the subject. (Eccleston) shares Blanc's impressions relative to the Abbé Predicateur. He knew him in the Seminary and has always been astonished that he found a Bishop to ordain him. If Blanc silences him entirely he would render a service to his diocese. Blanc is to send a list of the questions and subjects he would like to be treated at the next Provincial Council.
(P.S.) Bishop (Joseph) Rosati writes that Father (Michael) O'Connor, (S.J.) of Pittsburgh is to be Bishop of Charleston.

V-4-m A.L.S. 4pp. 4to.
8


1842 Oct 9

Blanc, Bishop Anthony
New Orleans, Louisiana

On November 14, 1841 Blanc laid the cornerstone of St. Augustine's Church situated on land at the west corner of Bayou and St. Claude Streets, given to the diocese by the Ursulines. In this stone have been placed papers and medals. A plaque dated October 9, 1842 was placed on the facade. (On the back of this is written): ". . . the placing of the cornerstone and the blessing."

V-4-m D. (French) 2pp. Folio
2


1842 Oct 10

Despond Sons and Company, Ch(arles)
Havre, (France)

To Bishop (Anthony) Blanc
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

They have addressed to Blanc two boxes for (Mark A.) Frenaye of Philadelphia sent by Choiselat Gallien. They contain candlesticks, sacred vessels, and books. They are on board the "Hudson," Captain Page.
(Enclosed in this letter is the bill of lading from Havre dated October 6, 1842. There is also a second copy of the letter) mailed on the "Louis XIV."

V 4 m A.L.S. (French) 5pp. 4to.
4


1842 Oct 10

(Kenrick), Bishop Francis Patrick
Phil(adelphia, Pennsylvania)

To Bishop Anthony Blanc
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

(Kenrick) presents Joseph C. Molloy who, with his family, is about to reside in New Orleans, (Kenrick) takes this opportunity to express his sympathy in the critical circumstances in which Blanc has been placed and his hope that those who have given trouble will soon return to their duty.

V-4-m A.L.S. 2pp. 4to.
2


1842 Oct 10

(Purcell), Bishop J(ohn)
Cin(cinnati, Ohio)

To Bishop Ant(hony) Blanc
New Orleans, L(ouisian)a

Father (John) Timon, (C.M.) kept them so engaged during a two week retreat that (Purcell) could not reply to Blanc's letter of September 20. (Purcell) prayed that Blanc might prevail and if the wretched trustees have prevailed they must hope that the Church will not suffer by the resignation of Father (Stephen) Rousselon and in his person of, as the "Courrier des Etats Unis" expresses it, the abstract right of the bishop. They had, on the strength of the hearsay, made Father (Constantine) Maenhaut a bishop in the Telegraph. He would have been better off in his old post in Ursuline Street. Whoever loves to spare his friends the trouble of digging him a grave may go to Hayti, where an earthquake may do the needful! (Purcell) is still in his old house; their building progresses very slowly. Yesterday they had a multitude in the sanctuary unable to find places in the body of the church. (Purcell) intended to go to Europe this fall but they have written from Rome to stay until the council and take the dispatches to Rome. A few German priests and some little financiering is all he has to settle. An unfortunate priest, Father (Joseph) Fr(e)ygang, ordained by Bishop (Frederick) Résé, foisted himself into a corner of (Purcell's) diocese but he was promptly exposed and condemned in open court for defamation. He is now turning a Methodist. Will Blanc tell Father (Victor) Jamey that (Purcell) has received his letter; he fears little can be done for Miss Johnson. She has not been to see (Purcell) since her return from New Orleans and her step-Father is a Presbyterian bigot.
V-4-m A.L.S. 4pp. 4to.
8


1842 Oct 11

Grant, W(illia)m
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

To Father (Stephen) Rousselon
(New Orleans, Louisiana)

Receipt for $10 for 12 Windsor chairs; signed by H.R. Clague.
V-4-m Receipt 1p. 32mo.
2


1842 Oct 14

Briggs, Lyman
Covington, Louisiana

to Father J.M. Bonniot
( )

Bonniot is authorized to marry Jean Guzman and Mathilde Baham, both of St. Tammany Parish.

V-4-m A.D.S. 1p. Folio
3


1842 Oct 14

(Hailandière), Bishop Cel(estin de la)
Vincennes, (Indiana)

To Bishop Anth(ony) Blanc
New Orleans, L(ouisian)a

It was only on his return from a long tour in the north of his diocese that he learned of Blanc's trouble with the trustees of his cathedral. A letter from Father S(tephen) Rousselon just received makes him fear things are not as near settlement as he had supposed. Doubtless Rousselon has acted for the best in resigning. At first sight he feared that it could have bad effects; he congratulates Rousselon on his generous act. The ordos will soon be arriving; 50 is more than he needs. The number of priests has diminished this year by deaths and other means which he deplores. He asks Blanc to overcome the reluctance Father (F.M.) Masquelet is said to have about remaining in the diocese by suppressing the hope Masquelet said Blanc gave him. P.S. He will take care of the 35 Masses.

V-4-m A.L.S. (French) 4pp. 4to.
3


1842 Oct 15

Calot, D.
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

To Bishop A(nthony) Blanc
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

Receipted bill for $36 for gilding crosses, frames, etc.
V-4-m A. Receipt S. 1p. 4to.
1


1842 Oct 16

(Portier), Bishop Michael
Mobile, (Alabama)

To Bishop A(nthony) Blanc
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

Yesterday (Portier) received Bishop (John Joseph) Chanche's letter which Blanc sent. (Portier) sees that Chanche tried to negotiate his own draft on Blanc and did not succeed. Blanc is to wait for a positive reply to his last letter; (Portier) hopes to arrange everything. He leaves on Wednesday for St. Augustine. He has written to Choiselat (Gallien). He will be back before December 1.
V-4-m A.L.S. (French) 2pp. 4to.
4


1842 Oct 17

(Chanche), Bishop John Joseph
Natchez, (Mississippi)

To Bishop (Anthony) Blanc
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

Father (Albino) Degaultier wishes to start today for New Orleans. (Chanche) yields him to Blanc as Bishop (Mathias) Loras gave him to (Chanche's) diocese. Father (Guillaume) L'Abbé goes with him to commence his mission on the coast. If there are no vestments on the coast, will Blanc lend him an old one? (Chanche) received Blanc's letter of the 11th; he doubts he will be able to make use of Blanc's drafts on Paris. What Blanc says about St. Patrick's Church, (New Orleans, Louisiana) is truly afflicting; (Chanche) hopes Father (James Ignatius) Mullon's activity will not be wanting on this occasion. If Blanc could buy it up and get rid of the trustees it would be a glorious thing. (Chanche) is delighted at the thought of Blanc coming to Natchez; he will nowhere he more welcome.

V-4-m A.L.S. 3pp. 4to.
6


1842 Oct 17

Purcell, Bishop J(ohn) B(aptist)
Cin(cinnati, Ohio)

To Bishop Ant(hony) Blanc
New Orleans, L(ouisian)a

Miss Mary D. Kemble, niece of General Cadwallader of Philadelphia, intends residing for a time in New Orleans. Mrs. De Witt of Baltimore interests herself in this lady and Purcell unites in the request that Blanc will introduce Kemble to some of the elite of French society.

V-4-m A.L.S. 2pp. 4to.
4


1842 Oct 18

(Chanche), Bishop John Joseph
Natchez, (Mississippi)

To Bishop (Anthony) Blanc
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

(Chanche) wrote yesterday by Father Labbé who expected to start for New Orleans with Father (Albino) De(s)gaultière. They found no boat; they will leave tomorrow morning. (Chanche) has looked in vain for means of negotiating bills upon Paris. Blanc could transact that kind of business draft. Blanc is to try to come up as soon as he can.

V-4-m A.L.S. 3pp. 4to.
3


1842 Oct 19

Maenhaut, Father C(onstantine), Fathers Bernard Permoli, Felipe Ascencio, E(dward) D'Hauw, V(ictor) Jamey, A(ngelo) Mascaroni
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

To Bishop (Anthony Blanc)
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

Maenhaut regrets that he has to afflict (Blanc) with the continual vexations of himself and his confreres. (Blanc) knows with what reluctance Maenhaut accepted the pastorship of the Cathedral of St. Louis. He hoped to reestablish peace after the scandal which made all honest people lament. At the first meeting of the trustees they welcomed him; at the second they received him coldly. The number of priests at the Cathedral had been raised to 10, not counting the pastor and master of ceremonies; they reduced it to three. They rejected the Chaplain of the hospital under the pretext that it was in the second municipality. They refused to receive Jamey as assistant for reasons Maenhaut will spare (Blanc). A new scale of fees was improvised in spite of Maenhaut's protests. One room of the Presbytery was locked up and when Maenhaut had it opened the president of the trustees made a scandalous scene. He and his confreres decided to draw up the following conditions:
1. The pastor is to have the use of all the rooms of the presbytery. 2. The trustees are to have no control over the appointment of priests. 3. No lay person will be charged with inspection of objects used for divine worship.
4. All lay employees are to be subject to the pastor.
5. That such employees be Catholic and of good standing. 6. The old scale fees will be used until the new one is approved. 7. All burials are to be made known first to the pastor or assistants and then to the trustees.
8. The trustees will address complaints of the clergy to (Blanc); they are asking no favors, only the rights of their predecessors. If the trustees do not agree, they ask that (Blanc) permit them to no longer remain at the presbytery.

V-4-m A.L.S. (French) 4pp. 4to.
7


1842 Oct 21

(Flaget), Bishop B(enedict) J(oseph)
Louisville, (Kentucky)

To Bishop A(nthony) Blanc
New Orleans, Lou(i)si(a)na

Blanc's truly desolate position afflicts (Flaget) as well as his coadjutor and all his priests. At the time of all the fuss, they were giving a jubilee to obtain the end of the persecution in Spain; (Flaget) prayed also for New Orleans threatened with schism whose
consequences one cannot foresee. When Blanc receives the decision of the Holy Father does he think these domineering men will submit? If Blanc has not already written to Bishop (John Joseph) Hugh(es) (Flaget) advises him to do so as soon as possible for his situation is exactly like Blanc's. By his gentleness and his visits, as well as by his sermons from the pulpit, Hugh(es) recovered all the rights of which all the Bishops had been deprived up to that time. If Blanc's cathedral had no more revenue than that of Louisville he would enjoy a profound peace. Blanc told (Flaget) nothing of the lively sortie of Father (Napoleon Joseph) Perché against his adversaries nor the impression they made. Someone very dear to (Flaget) would like to know what payment Perché gets from the Ursulines besides board and lodging, in brief what are his net revenues per year. He does not have the same calmness in replying to Blanc's question about Father (John) Bruyère. He is very much attached to Bruyère and Blanc is the first to tell (Flaget) that he wants to leave Kentucky and return to Louisiana. Bruyère has never spoken of dissatisfaction; he has often said he had never been so happy. As (Flaget's) coadjutor (Bishop Guy Ignatius Chabrat) has all the details of the administration, on his return (Flaget) will find out whether Bruyère has asked for an exeat. Next week (Flaget) hopes to go to Bruyère's vicinity; he will see him and beg him to let Blanc know his latest intention. However (Flaget) will say with his usual candor that he will be against Blanc; he thinks it was enough to have lost Perché. Will Bishop (Joseph) Rosati be bishop of Santo Domingo or will it be Father (Constantine) Maenhaut? P.S. Mr. Bonnecaze of Baton Rouge has received $100 for (Flaget's) niece; (Flaget) has asked him to give it to Blanc if he could find no safe opportunity to get it to Louisville. It has been two months and nothing has come.

V-4-m A.L.S. (French) 4pp. 8vo.
9


1842 Oct 21

(Mègret, Father Anthony Desiré
Lafayette, Louisiana)

Copy of two letters to A. Latiolais and L.P. Mouton on the occasion of the funeral of Mrs. Joseph Mouton, their mother and mother-in-law, and the reply of these two gentlemen to the first.
1842 Oct 20

(Megret, Father A.D.)
Lafayette, Louisiana)

To (A. Latiolais and L.P. Mouton
Lafayette, Louisiana)

(Megret) has learned that, at their orders, the candles were taken from the church after the funeral. The custom is that candles which began to burn in ceremonies in honor of God are not to be used for profane purposes. He expects their kindness and piety will press them to issue new orders.

Copy (French)

--------
1842 Oct 21

(Latiolais, A. and L.P. Mouton
Lafayette, Louisiana)

To (Father A.D. Megret
Lafayette, Louisiana)

It is the custom here that each does as he wishes with his own property; they do not need a dictator.

Copy (French)

--------
(1842) Oct 21

(Mégret, Father A.D.
Lafayette, Louisiana)

To (A. Latiolais and L.P. Mouton
Lafayette, Louisiana)

In the civilized world each has his place and each is master in his own domain. True democracy respects authority; they try to restrict it even in the religion which is outside human administration. Maurice (Mouton) knows that his jurisdiction as parish judge does not extend to the cemetery; Edm(ond?) Mouton, a trustee, knows that he can do nothing without his group. They arranged everything without (Megret): he did the best he could for the sake of the deceased. Soon they will be assuming the stole in what they call their own church with which the pastor of Lafayette would have nothing to do. A light offered in a religious ceremony becomes the property of the Church. They must respect in their pastor the authority he holds from the Church.
V-4-m Copies (French) 3pp. 4to.
6


1842 Oct 23

Bach, Father F(erdinand) D(ominic)
Springhill, (Alabama)

To Father (Stephen) Rousselon
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

Bach's plan of going to New Orleans to offer his services to the bishop and ask hospitality for a few days cannot be carried out right now. Bishop (Michael) Portier being obliged to leave for St. Augustine, judged that Bach could leave only with the students. So everything is put off until the 8th or 10th of November. In the meantime Bach will probably receive a letter from Paris. Bach hears that the pastor is quarreling with his trustees; it seems that soon they will not want him any more than they wanted Rousselon. All three cold be going together. And Father (Constantine) Maenhaut who refused Bishop (Joseph) Rosati's appeal could find the prophecy made to St. Peter: "Alius te cinget et ducet quo tu non vis" come true for him. May religion lose nothing by these diabolical maneuvers!

V-4-m A.L.S. (French) 2pp. 4to.
4


1842 Oct 23

Wood, James F(rederick)
Rome, (Italy)

To Bishop Jo(h)n B(aptist) Purcell
Cincinnati, Ohio

He acknowledges Purcell's of August 21 which he received at Frascati. He speaks in detail of his vacation there, of celebrations, and of a meeting with Pope (Gregory XVI) at Galora, while the Pope was on his way from Castel Gandolfo. He is not over anxious to return. He has been appointed a prefect. (Continued) November 4. He thanks Purcell for his kindness to his family. Bishop (Edward) Barron was consecrated on All Saints apparently for Liberia. Bishop (Joseph) Rosati is still in Rome.
(P.S.) If Purcell wants his return he should urge it repeatedly to get results.

II-4-h A.L.S. 4pp. 8vo.
5


1842 Oct 27

(Blanc, Bishop Anthony
New Orleans, Louisiana)

To The Trustees of St. Louis Church
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

Not knowing how to interpret their silence about the
communication he sent them on the 21st. Blanc again, and at the request of the priests of the Cathedral, asks them to let him know the resolution they have taken or propose to take. If their reply is not received by the 31st, the priests will be authorized to leave the presbytery and the Cathedral after informing the public of this step and of the way in which they will continue their religious services. It depends on the trustees to prevent this.

A. Draft (French) 1p.

On the same paper:

--------
1842 Oct 21

(Blanc, Bishop Anthony
New Orleans, Louisiana)

To The Trustees of St. Louis Church
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

(Blanc) sends them a copy of a communication (no enclosure) just addressed to him by the pastor of the Cathedral, in his name and that of his colleagues. Painful as a like communication is for (Blanc) he does not believe he has a right to refuse his approval. These priests are not demanding any privileges or new rights but simply what their predecessors enjoyed for all time. (Blanc) does not see how he could force a priest to live in a post where he could not offer him a guarantee of inherent rights and also the tranquility so essential to the performance of his ministry. And how could that be if instead of the respect due his character as a priest, he sees himself exposed to the insults of which the pastor of the Cathedral complains. (Blanc) would like to believe that these were expressions of fleeting anger but they owe it to themselves as well as to (the priests) to prevent a repetition by complying with the requests of the pastor and his assistants. By refusing to do the right thing they will show themselves not only enemies of the peace but also of religion. (Blanc) hopes their reply will be prompt and favorable so that a veil can be thrown over the past and that they can work and live together.

A. Draft (French) 2pp.

V-4-m A. Drafts (French) 3pp. 4to.
1


(1842) (Oct 28)

(Anduze, Father Matthew Bernard
New Orleans, Louisiana)

( A notebook). Outline of a history of the Church in Louisiana.
A. Outline (French) 2pp.

In the same notebook:

An index of the contents of this notebook. L., a notary public certifies that they are actual copies of letters in his office.
1824 Sep 11

Dubourg, Bishop Wil(liam)
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

To Father M(atthew) B(ernard) Anduze
(New Orleans, Louisiana)

The thought alone of the danger Anduze escaped makes Dubourg tremble. Dubourg is slow in thanking Dr. Smith. Dubourg is detained by a bad arm following his fever, but hopes in a few days to go up to La Fourche and then to G(rand) Cot(eau). He will take Anduze's advice to wait for the Plaquemine steamboat. What he fears most is that the health or fears of Father (Leo Raymond) de Neckéré will make him dread the burden. Anduze is to encourage him, tell him about the state of the country, that he should not fear anymore than Anduze and Fathers (J. Buysch) Bysiche and (Charles) de Lacroix. De Neckéré's sweetness and patience and solid instruction will carry him through.

Copy (French)

--------
1827 Aug 12

Rosati, Bishop Joseph
New O(rleans, Louisiana)

To Father M(atthew) B(ernard) Anduze
(New Orleans, Louisiana)

Rosati esteems and loves Anduze too much to see him leave without sorrow; it is discouraging to lose one of their best co-workers. His reasons of health justify his departure. Rosati gives him permission to go to France on condition that he return to the diocese which has so much need of priests, especially one of Anduze's merit. He will never lack a place. Rosati cannot put off his trip; he would upset everyone who is waiting for Confirmation. He will be gone about four weeks.
Copy (French)

Anduze had hardly arrived in France when he received the offer of an excellent place at the chaplain's headquarters. He refused it because of an important affair in Madrid.

A. Note (French)

--------
1828 May 9

Despères, Franchet, Minister of Police
Paris, (France)

To The General in Chief, Comte d'Espagne
Madrid, (Spain)

Father Anduze, who brings this letter, is one of Despères' friends who has labored long in America and who is in Madrid in the interest of their king. Despères takes the occasion to congratulate d'Espagne on the pacification of Catalonia which was in great part d'Espagne's work.
Copy (French)

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1828 Dec 18

Croy, Comte de
Paris, France

to Father (Matthew Bernard) Anduze
Paris, (France)

Croy welcomes the opportunity to prove how sacred are his promises to his friends. One of the results of his steps at Madrid is a formal pledge of the Plenipotentiary Maberly to send a million(?) which will be paid immediately after the signature for the loan. This is how he will distribute this sum: Anduze will have 200 thousand francs; Croy has written to G. to assure him of a like sum as well as to Mon... and 100 thousand francs to D.

Copy (French)

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1829 Jan 4

Croy, Comte de
(Paris, France)

To (Father Matthew Bernard Anduze)
(Paris, France)

Croy thanks Anduze for his letter; he thinks that (Charles Maurice?) De Talleyrand must have received the details Croy gave him yesterday or the day before, after Anduze wrote. Croy does not know which side Talleyrand will take; he will let Anduze know. Croy encloses a paper important for their loan; it will be their order on the banker. (Anduze's note): N.B. These two letters will give his friends an idea of his facility in making up his expenditures.

Copy (French)

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1829 J(an.) 31

Talleyrand, (Charles Maurice?) De
(Paris, France?)

To Father (Matthew Bernard) Anduze
(Paris, France)

Talleyrand is writing today to H. Anduze is to read his letter and tell him what he thinks of it so that before Anduze's arrival Talleyrand can prepare himself for the objections that may come up. Many good or bad things could come from this step according to the first direction they will give. He relies on Anduze's sound judgment.

Copy (French)

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1829 Jan 14

Gallois
Brest, (France)

To Father (Matthew Bernard) Anduze
Paris, (France)

When Anduze receives this letter, he will also no doubt have one dated the 13th sent this morning under cover of the Admiralty. In that one Gallois asked Anduze to pay Mr. Talma, Lieutenant Commander, the 300 francs he gave Anduze before his departure which will be tomorrow. Gallois has just received the draft of this sum as well as Anduze's letter of January 10. Anduze now has only to send 150 francs to Duchatel, Jr. He hopes Anduze will thank him for making him acquainted with the Duchatel family. The countess is a person of much spirit; the Count one of the most estimable of men. The daughter of the house who no doubt will be married this winter is one of the most well bred young persons Gallois knows. The son Tauneguy Duchatel is one of the distinguished men of the time; Anduze will find himself in accord with him on many points. He blames, like Anduze, the system of education. He has a plan for Paris in which instruction would be rid of many routines. This young theorist is occupied with a work on charity; what Gallois read while Duchatel was working at Mirambeau, seemed full of force and reason. Talma will bring the certificates and box. As for the button it is destined to be lost; he did not find it.
Copy (French)

Anduze leaves for another time the publication of documents about Spain, Algiers, etc. A document connected with the Archbishop of Genoa, Nuncio at Paris; today, Cardinal Lambruschini, Secretary of State. He left for Rome, arriving at the end of October. He was received with great kindness by Cardinal Albany who told him that His Holiness gave no audiences during October. But His Holiness learning of Anduze's arrival, Anduze received the following letter the same day.
1829 Oct 30

Secretary of State
(Rome, Italy)

To Father (Matthew Bernard) Anduze
(Rome, Italy)

Anduze is informed that His Holiness will receive Anduze tomorrow at one in the afternoon.

Copy (Italian)

At Rome Anduze was honored by the esteem of all the members of the Sacred College; he was chosen to be the godfather of one of the catechumens baptized on Holy Saturday by Cardinal Zurla. Cardinal Odescalchi was godfather for one and the Nuncio of Florence for another. See the papers of the time; friend of king and religion. At Rome Anduze undertook to restore the Church of Mexico and in spite of the violent opposition of the Duc de Labrador, ambassador of Spain, he succeeded. The following is a copy of a petition submitted to the Holy Father by Father Sala, translated into Italian by Monsignor Rafaele Fornari; the original translation is in the archives of the notary with the other papers. (Here Anduze copies his) Politico- religious considerations presented to Pope P(iu)s VIII (on the subject of Mexico and Spain). This was re-examined at Rome; it was resolved to establish Mexican Bishops and (Francis Paul) Vasquez was consecrated at Rome as Bishop of Puebla de los Angeles.

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1830 Jun 19

Fornari, Monsignor Rafaele
Rome, (Italy)

To Father (Matthew Bernard) Anduze
(Rome, Italy)

On affairs in Mexico. After much research and more letters, they received Anduze's through Count Filippo de Carpena. A meeting was held but the results are still secret.

Copy (Italian)

The July revolution forced Anduze to leave Paris without being able to pursue his correspondence with Fornari. Anduze never ceased to have friends among the most influential people.

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1830 Nov(?)15

Garibaldi, Monsignor A., Intermuncio at Paris
Paris, (France)

To Father (Matthew Bernard) Anduze
Liverpool, England

Garibaldi thanks Anduze for giving him news of himself; he wishes him a good journey. He believes that in America Anduze will be more quiet than they are in Europe. Here they are quiet enough now; the meetings of the workers ended with meetings. However, there are many political associations which cause anxiety to the government. Perhaps the recognition of Louis Philippe I, which appeared imminent, will give prestige to French trade. Italy is quiet; there is an Austrian army of nearly 100,000 men in Lombardy; there is fear for Spain. As for Garibaldi, there seems signs of leaving here. His chief, the Cardinal Secretary of State, is well and is pleased to have news of Anduze. Garibaldi saw Anduze's agent yesterday; he has been at his house several times. Garibaldi made a call for Anduze on Mr. Carpagna who was very happy to have news of him. His case is won and he is busy with the settlement. He has had no recent news of his sister but always expects some. Garibaldi's colleague sends greetings.

Copy (French)

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1831 Jan 13

De Neckere, Bishop Leo (Raymond)
St. Michael, (Louisiana)

To (Father Matthew Bernard Anduze)
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

No one knows better than de Neckere the vast needs of this portion of the Church and so no one can better appreciate the talent, zeal and piety given them by Anduze. The most neglected part of the diocese at present is Pointe Coupée, Fausse Rivière, and St. Francisville where English is as necessary as French. Iberville is also impatiently waiting for a pastor. Father Delacroix as well as the Ladies of the Sacred Heart were very happy to have Anduze's visit.

Copy (French)

The following year de Neckere created the position of Preacher in the Cathedral for Anduze while he was pastor of Iberville. Anduze did not wish to fill it; it remained vacant. In 1834 Father (Louis) Moni left for Italy. Bishop (Anthony) Blanc had him come down from Iberville to fill it. In 1838 Anduze settled his affairs and was about to leave for Europe when an unusual event called him to the French fleet at Vera Cruz.

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1839 Mar 22

Blanc, Bishop Ant(hony)
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

To Father (Matthew Bernard) Anduze
Vera Cruz, (Mexico)

Blanc received Anduze's letter only four days ago. It was given him by a young officer whose Father he saw at a gathering at Mr. David's. Since the letter Blanc has not been able to see the consul until this evening. Mrs. David told him that she had given a letter to the sacristan who must have forgotten to deliver it. He awaits tomorrow to have it; he hastens to write Anduze so that he can send it in the consul's envelope. The new peace treaty has made everyone rejoice. Anduze can appreciate more than they the merit of Admiral (Charles) Baudin. He learned with no less pleasure how the Commandant of the Météor had given attention to Anduze's keeping of Lent. Blanc presumes that Anduze has had other letters telling of Mr. J.'s death. Their retreat was held February 20 to 28. Blanc has appointed Father (Stephen) Rousselon his vicar-general and has replaced Rousselon with Father (Benedict) Roux. If Anduze visits Texas Blanc would be grateful if Anduze saw the Bishop of Monterey and if chance takes him to Havana to make some inquiries about the letters patent relative to the erection of the see of New Orleans. Blanc believes his letter did not reach Father Lopez; Father (Francis) Chambige arrived today from Havana.

Copy (French)

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1837 Jan 6

Bassier, P.E., Recorder of the Senate and Joseph Walker, Recorder of the House of Representatives
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

To Father (Matthew Bernard) Anduze
(New Orleans, Louisiana)

In the name of the Committee in charge of the ceremonies for January 8, they ask Anduze to recall for them the memory of a glorious day and the courage of their soldiers.

Copy (French)

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1840 Jan 11

Lesseps, Ch(arles), Secretary of the City Council
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

To Father (Matthew Bernard Anduze
New Orleans, Louisiana)

The committee in charge of arrangements to lay the corner stone of a monument commemorating the victory of January 8, 1815, in the Place d'Armes opposite the Cathedral, presume to rely on Anduze to speak on this occasion.
(Signed by) E. Duplessis, Lesseps, J. Lefevre, C. Delery, F. Buisson.
N.B. General (Andrew) Jackson is the hero of this celebration.
Copy (French)

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1839 Feb 5

(Blanc), Bishop Ant(hony)
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

As Father Matthew Bernard Anduze is preparing to go to Mexico, Blanc gives him faculties to exercise his ministry. Rousselon signs as pro-secretary.

Copy (Latin)

This was when Anduze was going to Vera Cruz and after the peace treaty he fulfilled a diplomatic mission in Texas. (Following) are confidential letters not to be published.

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1839 Apr 10

Baudin, Charles, The Néréide
Port of Vera Cruz, (Mexico)

To Father (Matthew Bernard Anduze
Vera Cruz, Mexico)

Here is an open letter for the President of the Republic of Mexico. Baudin has said nothing to the President on the object of Anduze's mission. Anduze is to inform him as he sees fit. Baudin believes that Anduze can declare himself frankly in the eventuality of a new quarrel between France and Mexico. Baudin leaves it to Anduze's ability and discretion. He thinks Anduze could precede him by 8 or 10 days in Houston and could have things started when Baudin joins him.
Copy (French)

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1839 Apr 25

Webb, James, Secretary of State
Houston, Texas

to Father (Matthew Bernard) Anduze
(Houston, Texas)

The President has under consideration the enquiries propounded by Anduze in his favor of the 18th and after mature deliberation is of the opinion . . . . The reasons for that conclusion will be found detailed in the enclosed communication to Admiral Baudin which Anduze is to hand to him on his arrival in this country. The President directs Webb to express the satisfaction Anduze's visit has afforded him and to assure him of the desire he entertains to form such amicable relations with France as he believes might be made mutually advantageous.
Copy (English)

On returning to New Orleans, Anduze found that by fraudulence he had lost everything he had; he received the following document:
1842 (?) Jun 1

(Blanc), Bishop Ant(hony)
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

To Father (Matthew Bernard) Anduze
(New Orleans, Louisiana)

By this (Blanc) confers on Anduze the title of Theologal of their Cathedral.

Copy (Latin)

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1842 Jun 20

Manzoni
Mobile, (Alabama)

to Father (Matthew Bernard) Anduze
(New Orleans, Louisiana)

Manzoni wrote a letter, addressed to Anduze, for Moni, which will be given Anduze by Santini and another one for Moni addressed to the bishop by today's mail which should arrive at the same time. Bishop (Michael) Portier has written to Rousselon through Santini in order that he may give the orders required by assistants of the parish relative to the new charge with which Anduze is invested. Moni continues the same, neither worse nor better.

Copy (French)

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1842 June 22

(Blanc), Bishop Ant(hony)
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

To Father M(atthew) B(ernard) Anduze
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

Since Moni, because of ill health, has to be absent from his parish, he asks the Anduze he appointed vicar administrator in his place. By this document (Blanc) approves.

Copy (Latin)

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1842 Jul 6

Moni, Father L(ouis)
Chocta(w) Point, (Alabama)

To Father (Matthew Bernard Anduze
New Orleans, Louisiana)

How happy and at ease Moni is after the appointment made by the Bishop. His parishioners well be very happy to proceed under his wisdom and zeal.

Copy (French)

Anduze is beginning to feel a strange influence.

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1842 Aug 8

(Blanc), Bishop Ant(hony)
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

To Father (Matthew Bernard) Anduze
(New Orleans, Louisiana)

After reflecting on the choice (Blanc) must make for a successor for the pastor of the Cathedral buried yesterday, he has decided on Rousselon. He does not know whether this will surprise Anduze but knowing his desire to see the service of the Cathedral on a worthy basis he hopes that he will see in this step an achievement of his views. (Blanc) counts on Anduze's devotion and advice for the new pastor whose good will he knows as well as (Blanc). He is to have the goodness to continue to represent the pastor until Rousselon has seen him or they have agreed on the time when he will come into the presbytery.
Copy (French)

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1842 Aug 17

(Blanc), Bishop Ant(hony)
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

To Father (Matthew Bernard) Anduze
(New Orleans, Louisiana)

(Blanc) made the effort to go out today at 10:15; he knocked on Anduze's door and was told that he had gone out. This trip tired (Blanc) some and he probably will not go out today. He wished only to tell Anduze that Rousselon would begin his duties as pastor today. He will do the best he can until the rooms assigned to him are ready. If (Blanc) had seen Anduze (here Anduze adds a marginal note saying that Blanc had met him, shown him the letter, talked to him and sent back the letter the same night) they would have defined the duties attached to his office of Theologal. It is not a position which they can canonically introduce in the New Orleans Cathedral as they have neither doctors in theology nor a benefice attached to it. (The duties of the office are outlined here). Anduze is to continue to direct the Ladies of Mercy and the Presentation Sisters until some other arrangement is made. (The allocation of fees is outlined).

Copy (French)

Whoever does not see what this letter contains can follow the progress. Ste, Colombe Davis went to the bishop's house to ask for the things necessary for Anduze to say Mass; at first it was refused because the Bishop said that Anduze stirred up the Americans of Lewisburg against him. H(orati)o(?) Davis told the bishop that he was the only American at Lewisburg and asked who were the authors of these calumnies. The bishop replied that he attached no importance to all that was said. (Anduze says) it is of little importance to deprive a 50 year old priest who has labored for almost 25 years of the faculty to say Mass. He must be left without shelter, food, or employment and horribly defamed. Anduze declares that the Bishop was disturbed as will be seen by the following letter:

A. Note (French)

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1842 Aug 29

(Blanc), Bishop Ant(hony)
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

To Father (Matthew Bernard) Anduze
(New Orleans, Louisiana)

Ste. Colombe Davis will tell Anduze that (Blanc) hesitated to send the things for Mass. (Blanc) gave Davis his reasons. (Blanc) says nothing of the real state of things and the disposition of spirit; Davis knows both better than (Blanc). (Anduze adds a footnote that H. Davis is General of the Brigade and Secretary of the trustees). The rest (Blanc) cannot write because Anduze does not regard his letters as addressed to him only. (Anduze adds a footnote that he was forced to show the letter of August 17 which ordered him to send to the pastor all those who addressed themselves to him). The last one caused great harm. (Blanc) cannot understand how their future relations can be on the footing of mutual confidence so necessary between bishop and priest. (Blanc) cannot understand how Anduze could have any agreement to exercise his ministry among the (trustees). He cannot offer any position to Anduze because he fears that he would not further(?) any offer made to him. (Anduze inserts that this was before his letter of the 30th, that Blanc had decided that Anduze was no longer the preacher at the Cathedral).

Copy (French)

Anduze's letter to Duplessis, which by its publication put so much blame on Anduze, could then be justified. This letter will change the one which follows, which is only a development of the two preceding ones.

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1842 Sep 16

(Blanc), Bishop Ant(hony)
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

To Father (Matthew Bernard) Anduze
(New Orleans, Louisiana)

The moment Anduze published his letter to Duplessis he should have foreseen that the last tie binding him to the diocese was broken. (Anduze adds a footnote that Blanc was waiting to see Anduze ask for an exeat). Anduze's position as theologal is abolished and all his faculties for the parish and city of Orleans are withdrawn; (Blanc) does not object to Anduze's use of ordinary faculties on the other side of the Lake.

Copy (French)

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1842 Sep 17

Anduze, Father M(atthew) B(ernard)
Lewisburg, (Louisiana)

To Bishop (Anthony Blanc
New Orleans, Louisiana)

Anduze acknowledges receipt of the letter of the 16th in which (Blanc) told him that his to Duplessis had broken the last tie with the diocese. Anduze is sorry that a letter, made necessary by the grossest lies, has deprived him of his bishop's good will. He has been in America 28 years; he made all his ecclesiastical studies in this country and has been a priest in Louisiana for almost 25 years to the entire satisfaction of the three bishops who preceded (Blanc) and to his up until today! By withdrawing his faculties (Blanc) has taken away his salary as preacher at the Cathedral. Anduze has debts; his body is worn with his labors. If (Blanc) reduces him to begging he will remain in New Orleans where he hopes to find compassionate friends.

Copy (French)

When the bishop let Anduze without employment or sustenance the Fabrique of the Cathedral sent him the following resolution.
1842 Sep 13

Dubuc, Ant(hony)
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

To Father M(atthew) B(ernard) Anduze
Lewisburg, (Louisiana)

As secretary of the St. Louis Cathedral, Dubuc informs Anduze of the resolution taken in the meeting of September 12. Mr. Genois presented the resolution, passed unanimously, that during the vacancy of the pastorship at St. Louis Church, Anduze, duly appointed temporary pastor, is asked to continue his functions with the fees which Moni received.

Copy (French)

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1842 Sep 14

Anduze, Father M(atthew) B(ernard)
Lewisburg, (Louisiana)

To The Trustees of St. Louis Church
N(ew) O(rleans, Louisiana)

While thanking them for their kindness, Anduze neither can nor should accept their offer. There duties which a priest cannot elude without violating the oath of his ordination and obedience is one of these. His superior having withdrawn his faculties, he cannot again use them without his consent. He has never sought public esteem except in following the rules of conduct of a priest and will never seek to keep that good opinion except by the same measure.

Copy (French)

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1842 Aug 20

Anduze, Father (Matthew Bernard)

(Lewisburg, Louisiana)

To Bishop (Anthony) Blanc
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

In the grave circumstances in which they find themselves, Anduze believes it is his duty to give his opinion frankly and to seek to clear up, by the truth, what is trying to lead astray men excited by jealousy or hate. When Blanc called him thought Dr. Labatut he respectfully received the explanations about what had taken place and promised to do what he could to calm the irritated feelings; he has kept this promise as far as Blanc's subsequent actions have permitted. He said openly that he would have liked to keep his position as preacher and that the humiliating prohibition to exercise his ministry was done rather to furnish the new pastor an opportunity to become acquainted than to force an old priest of the diocese to leave the post. He refused all offers made to him, he gave up his room. He did not wish to take it back, although the trustees recalled the concession made to Father (Constantine) Maenhaut. In order to avoid putting the authorities in the wrong he refused to publish his justification. It would have been easy for Blanc to consult the registers of the fabrique and convince himself that the accusations were false. He begs Blanc by his 25 years of service, by the memory of Bishop Dubourg, by the prudence of Bishop Rosati, by the sanctity of Bishop de Neckere not to go further down a path which will be deadly to religion. In spite of injustice Anduze can never forget his duty as a priest; he will establish his rights with respect and submission.

Copy (French)

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1842 Sep 21

Blanc, Bishop Ant(hony)
N(ew) O(rleans, Louisiana)

To Father (Matthew Bernard) Anduze
(Lewisburg, Louisiana)

Blanc received Anduze's letter of the 17th. Does Anduze not understand that the witness of his conscience and that of his many friends should suffice. Anduze says he has debts; he will find that what he has surpasses his debts and that he will still have the means to live in Europe where he will find the interior peace he will look for in vain here. His remaining here will add to the afflicting scandal they have just had and he hopes Anduze will think twice before deciding. Blanc regrets that he must hold to the instructions in his letter of August 16.
Copy (French)

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1842 Sep 21

Dubuc, Ant(hony)
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

To Father (Matthew Bernard) Anduze
Lewisburg, (Louisiana)

In the meeting on September 20, Mr. Genois presented the following resolutions with a substitution by Mr. La Seroe(?) and an amendment by Mr. Percy: Learning that Anduze has been interdicted without any justification known to the council, it is resolved that the monthly salary Anduze received as a preacher be continued to January 1 and that he be invited to supervise, during that time, the school run by Mrs. Lemper(?), at the expense of the fabrique.

Copy (French)

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1842 Oct 25

Anduze, Father M(atthew) B(ernard)
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

To Bishop (Anthony) Blanc
(New Orleans, Louisiana)

It is more than a month since Anduze has ascended the altar. For more than 22 years he has been a priest of the diocese. When for a time he had permission to leave the diocese it was for the good of religion. At Rome he worked to reconstitute the Church of Mexico; at Vera Cruz he labored with the fleet; in Texas he prepared the way for the new Vicar Apostolic. Returning to New Orleans, he yielded to the entreaties of the people in deciding to fill the post of preacher created for him by de Neckere; the pews brought in $2,000 more than the year before. The jealousy and hatred built up during Moni's illness exploded the very day of his burial. Anduze's obedience to orders made him look guilty in the eyes of the public. When the time comes Anduze will make known the injustices of which he is the victim.

Copy (French)

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1842 Oct 26

Blanc, Bishop Ant(hony)
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

To Father (Matthew Bernard) Anduze
(New Orleans, Louisiana)

Blanc knows how painful it must be for a priest ordained 22 years to see the feasts pass without taking part as a priest. But whose fault is it? If Anduze rereads Blanc's letters and recalls the conversation he had with Bishop Portier on his last visit to Notre Dame he will be forced to agree that Blanc could expect anything but a pompous display of all the services he pretends to have rendered to religion. It is not simply the publication of the letter which was the determining factor in withdrawing his faculties but his conduct since then. Anduze renounced the faculties left to him by returning to New Orleans and accepting from the trustees the office of supervisor of a school for little girls with the modest salary of $133 a month. There was a time when Anduze's conscience would have reproached him.

Copy (french)

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1842 Oct 28

Anduze, Father M(atthew) B(ernard)
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

To Bishop (Anthony Blanc
New Orleans, Louisiana)

After his respectful letter of the 25th Anduze was far from expecting (Blanc's) answer of yesterday. (Blanc) Must realize what Anduze felt when he came to ask a blessing on his departure, to have (Blanc) suddenly put the robe of the centaur on him. Anduze is now going to examine what (Blanc) calls the whole lot of reasons which make it (Blanc's) duty to persist in the rigorous measures toward Anduze. If the end of his troubles depend only on Anduze, what must he do, for the oftener he rereads (Blanc's) letters the less he finds any words of truce. Anduze sees that (Blanc) was deceived about the interview with Portier. J(ea)n B(aptis)te Moreau came to Anduze's house to tell him about his evening with the Bishop of Mobile who had a lively interest in Anduze and who wished Anduze to ask for an interview. He yielded with difficulty to Moreau's request. The meeting was at the house of Mr. Lesne in the presence of witnesses and lasted 3 and hours and certainly he received no reproach from Portier although his conduct was well known to him and Anduze's correspondence with (Blanc) was shown to him. Portier asked him to go with him to Mobile; Anduze refused. Then he proposed to take Anduze on the next day to visit (Blanc) and Anduze accepted with pleasure. The Bishop of Mobile did not keep his word. As for his appointment as supervisor of school for little girls, if (Blanc) had taken the trouble to read the minutes of the trustees' meeting he could have spared himself a page of unmerited reproaches. Anduze did not get one ounce of happiness in saying Mass on a porch in a place where there are only 4 or 5 families during three months of the year. The trustees thought of doing justice to a priest who raised the sale of pews by $2000. (Blanc) is to read the proceedings and see if Anduze is worthy of excommunication. As for the public which (Blanc) mingles with and those who think like Anduze, he has neither flatterers nor parasites and can only help his best friends by his prayers. Anduze's position is untenable. It is in vain that he submits in silence; peace is not restored.

Copy (French)

Page 10 contains the letter of April 4 and the reply of the 7th and a letter written to Father (Napoleon Joseph) P(erch)é(?). (These letters are not on page 10 of this notebook). In January 1841 Anduze received a letter from an Ursuline asking him to use his influence with the Bishop to render her a service. This letter was very curious especially because of certain reflections on the house, etc. Here is Anduze's reply which shows that he was never deceived.

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1841 Jan 29

Anduze, Father M(atthew) B(ernard)
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

To Sister . . .
(New Orleans, Louisiana)

Sister's letter greatly astonished Anduze. It is true, as she says, that he has been in America 25 years, that he has been a priest more than 20 years. Old servants are like old horses; it is foolish to count on past services. Anduze no longer has any influence nor does he desire any. Bishop Dubourg was a Father, Rosati a confrere, de Neckere a dear friend. Anduze does not see Blanc except officially to receive his orders or ask his blessing.

Copy (French)

V-4-m Copies of Letters (French, Italian, Latin, English) 49pp. Folio


1842 Oct 28

Baraga, Father Frederick
Lapointe, (Wisconsin)

To Bishop (Peter Paul) Lefevere
Detroit, Michigan

Baraga acknowledges the receipt of 2 boxes of beautiful candles, and a box of crackers. He is very happy about it. Baraga apologizes for having charged $400 to the Bishop's account, but he is sure that he will receive the money next fall from Europe. If the Bishop was unable to pay the money, it does not matter because the Company does not lose anything, Baraga will pay the interest. There were many sick this fall. Within the last 19 days 4 children died and 3 men. Two of the children were pagans, but were baptized just before death. He carries the sacraments often all day long to the sick, but he himself feels well. The crackers came in very handy because the store did not have any this year and sick people ask for them often. They dip them in sugar water and prefer them to anything else. He will correct the Ottawa books during the winter and send them to l'Arbre Croche next spring. He is sorry that he has no time to write to Father (Otto) Skolla whose letter he has received.

III-2-g A.L.S. French 3pp.
2


1842 Oct 28

Bellune, Duc de
Versailles, (France)

To Bishop (Anthony Blanc
New Orleans, Louisiana)

Leaving New Orleans June 16, he arrived at Marseilles on August 3. In France he fell ill; Madame de Bellune joined him and her care hastened his recovery. He will never forget (Blanc's) kindness. It is 4 months since he has heard from B(ar)on Burthe; he had also promised to write to the Duchess. They would like to know what has become of Mrs. Beaumont. Blanc would do them a favor in letting them know about Burthe and Beaumont.
P.S. Not knowing the address of Father M(atthew) B(ernard) Anduze Bellune encloses a note for him which Blanc is to give him.
V-4-m A.L.S. (French) 4pp. 12mo.
4


1842 Oct 31

(Odin), Bishop John Mary
Houston, (Texas)

to Father E(tienne) Rousselon
New Orleans, L(ouisian)a

On the 26th (Odin) had to give William C. (Byrne) Burnes an order on Rousselon for 100 piastres which Hackney and Benoist had given Rousselon. (Odin) had to raise their little chapel at Galveston which the storm had overturned which cost 150 piastres which Burnes advanced. He has only $125 left to settle; Rousselon is to let him know if Father (Bonaventure) Armengol paid the first note and if Rousselon received the money from Father (Joseph) Evrard and the 100 piastres the Ursulines were to give him. There has been some yellow fever and other fever from which few have escaped. On the second of this month (Odin) had to take to his bed. He has been at Houston since last Thursday; yesterday he began the jubilee. Their minds seem occupied only with ideas of war and the Mexicans. Father (Eudald) Estany, (C.M.) was held prisoner for four days at Victoria; (Odin) does not yet know the reason. Father (Michael) Calvo, (C.M.) is still at San Antonio but most of the people have taken refuge on the other side of the Rio Grande. The San Antonio valley is almost deserted, the families scattered along the Guadeloupe have retired to the banks of the Colorado. The Republic of Texas is in a sad state. (Odin) wanted to write to Bishop Blanc but the boat going down to Galveston is so near he will not have time.
P.S. If the new ordos are printed, Rousselon is to send him a dozen.
V-4-m A.L.S. (French) 3pp. 4to.
10


(1842 Nov 2)

(Blanc), Bishop (Anthony)
N(ew) Orl(eans, Louisiana)

A notebook containing copies of nine letters, all but one in (Blanc's) hand.

--------
(1842) Sep 16

(Blanc, Bishop Anthony
New Orleans, Louisiana)

To The Trustees of St. Louis Church
N(ew) Orl(eans, Louisiana)

The pastorship of St. Louis Church being again vacant, (Blanc) notifies them that he has appointed Father Constantine Maenhaut. He hopes this will be received with pleasure by them and by all the Catholic population of New Orleans.

A. Copy (French)

--------
(1842) Sep 17

(Blanc, Bishop Anthony
New Orleans, Louisiana)

To Father (Matthew Bernard) Anduze
Louisbourg, (Louisiana)

When Anduze published his letter to (E.?) Duplessis, he should have foreseen that the last tie with ecclesiastical authority of the diocese was broken. The position of Theologal is abolished and all Anduze's faculties for the city and the Parish of Orleans are withdrawn. (Blanc) is not opposed to Anduze's keeping ordinary faculties to exercise his ministry on the other side of the Lake. Anduze is to believe that (Blanc) has a real interest in him and desires to see him use his talents which Providence has given him.

A. Copy (French)

--------
1842 Sep 17

(Blanc, Bishop Anthony
New Orleans, Louisiana)

To (E.A.) Canon, President of the Trustees
(New Orleans, Louisiana)

The enclosed letter has not been opened, but as it seems to come from the Secretary of the Trustees, (Blanc) would like to know if it is from their head or by particular instruction that their communications are addressed to him in this form. In the first case it would be an insult; in the second it would indicate that the trustees fail to recognize his position as a bishop and so he refuses to receive their communications. As far as Canon is personally concerned, (Blanc) has been informed that such proceedings would not be approved by him and so he writes him for an explanation.

A. Copy (French)

--------
1842 Sep 18

(Blanc, Bishop Anthony
New Orleans, Louisiana)

To (E.A.) Canon
(New Orleans, Louisiana)

Dating from today, the position of Theologal is abolished. The pastor and Father (Victor) Jamey whom (Blanc) has just named assistant will fulfill the function of preacher without an increase in salary. (Blanc) hopes that Canon and his colleagues will see in this a sincere desire to lessen the expenses of the Cathedral without impairing the religious services.

A. Copy (French)

--------
1842 Sep 21

(Blanc, Bishop Anthony
New Orleans, Louisiana)

To Father (Matthew Bernard) Anduze
Lewisburg, (Louisiana)

(Blanc) has received Anduze's letter of the 17th acknowledging receipt of (Blanc's) of the 16th. (Blanc) is the bishop and can speak only as a Bishop. Anduze says that he is grieved that his letter pf August 30 deprived him of the good will of the bishop especially since Anduze considers that letter a necessity because of the lies spread about him. Why does Anduze not understand that his own conscience and his numerous friends should have sufficed. He has no doubt created some suspicions against his bishop and his confreres by publishing the letter, but most of all against himself. He has scandalized the piety of the faithful and how can he any longer preach charity and pardon. Anduze says he has debts, but he will find that what he has will be enough to enable him to live modestly in Europe where he will find that interior peace which (Blanc) fears he will seek here in vain. Anduze talks of remaining in the city; (Blanc) believes he will think twice about it because of the scandal in which they are involved. The present is only a prelude to peace. (Blanc) fears that Anduze's presence would only revive the feelings which are calmed down at the moment. (Blanc) is obliged to abide by his instructions in his letter of the 16th.
A. Copy (French)

--------
1842 Sep 24

(Blanc, Bishop Anthony
New Orleans, Louisiana)

To Father (Matthew Bernard) Anduze
(New Orleans, Louisiana)

Anduze's note of this morning asking for permission to celebrate Mass would indicate that he did not receive (Blanc's) letter of the 21st. If he did receive it, his action only confirms (Blanc's) belief that Anduze does not have the moral dispositions to ascend the altar. After publishing his letter of August 30 he asks to celebrate Mass without any preliminary reparation. In the meeting of the clergy on the 23rd, Anduze withdrew his statement that Father (Stephen) Rousselon's) appointment was nul. But does he not feel that he revoked this withdrawal by publishing that he was not free in his opinions in this meeting, that he had been "kidnaped." (Blanc) has, up to now, avoided any censure against Anduze, strictly speaking, so that he could certify him truthfully in case of need, but if Anduze brings it on himself, (Blanc) cannot do otherwise. What (Blanc) has said in this letter is dictated by a real interest he still has for Anduze.

Copy (French)

--------
(1842) Oct 7

(Blanc, Bishop Anthony
New Orleans, Louisiana)

To Father (Matthew Bernard) Anduze
(New Orleans, Louisiana)

(Blanc) did not receive the letter Anduze says he sent him at St. James. As to the subject of today's letter, he can only say that he neither approves nor disapproves the plan to establish a college at Mandeville. To approve it would, in a way, encourage an undertaking in whose success he has no faith considering the present times. To disapprove, he has no right.

A Copy (French)

--------
1842 Oct 26

(Blanc, Bishop Anthony
New Orleans, Louisiana)

To Father (Matthew Bernard) Anduze
(New Orleans, Louisiana)

Surely it must be painful for a priest ordained 22 years not to be able to participate as a priest in the religious services. But whose fault is it? Anduze should reread (Blanc's) letters and if he recalls the interview he had with Bishop (Michael) Portier at the time of Portier's last visit, he cannot fail to agree that (Blanc) could expect only a pompous show of all the services Anduze pretends to have given religion, the apparent aim of which was to prove that the pain he had suffered had not been merited. It is no longer simply the publishing of his unfortunate letter, which was the determining factor in the withdrawal of faculties for the city and Parish of Orleans, it is a question of his conduct since then. By an unexplainable condescension, (Blanc) has left Anduze his faculties for the other side of the Lake. Anduze renounced them by coming to New Orleans to accept from the trustees the office of superintendent of a school for little girls with the modest salary of $133 a month! There was a time when Anduze's conscience would have reproached him.

A. Copy (French)

--------
1842 Nov 2

(Blanc, Bishop Anthony
New Orleans, Louisiana)

To Father (James) Lesne
(New Orleans, Louisiana)

This is to inform Lesne that, for reasons they have shown and which (Blanc) has sent on to the trustees without having any answer, the pastor and assistants of St. Louis Church are authorized to withdraw from the presbytery and church and come to the bishop's residence, from whence they will carry spiritual aid to the sick and exercise their ministry without any connection with the trustees. Lesne's duties, if he remains at the funeral chapel, until further notice, are not to be changed in any way. He is to simply bless the bodies without either a funeral or accompaniment to the cemetery. The priests plan to withdraw today; if Lesne wishes to do the same, he will receive the same welcome at the bishop's house.

A. Copy (French)

V-4-m Copybook 13pp. 8vo.
10


1842 Nov 2

Gardner, Edward M.
Nantucket, (Rhode Island)

To O(restes) a. Brownson
Boston, Massachusetts

They had Mr. (George) Bancroft there for a lecture, and that he gave a brilliant one. But the folks are not satisfied. They want Brownson. Not only the Democrats but the Whig friends, also. And the leading Federals are afraid he will come. He asks that Brownson come in the name of Democracy. Brownson's personal friends want to see him. Mrs. Gardner would like to have Mrs. Brownson visit her. They can reach Nantucket in the night by leaving Boston in the morning.

I-3-f A.L.S. 1p. 8vo.
5


1842 Nov 3

(Chanche), Bishop John Joseph
Natchez, (Mississippi)

To Bishop (Anthony) Blanc
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

Chanche has negotiated Blanc's bills on Paris. $1700 have been advanced to him and when they learn what they sell for in New York the balance will be given to him. This arrangement has put (Chanche) above water for a while; he fears embarrassment. The cotton planters have no money and the subscriptions come in slowly. He has heard nothing since Blanc wrote of the affairs of St. Patrick's Church. Have Blanc's priests left the parish? What has become of Father (Matthew Bernard) Anduze?

V-4-m A.L.S. 3pp. 4to.
3


1842 Nov 4

Flagg, William J.
New Haven, (Connecticut)

To O(restes) A. Brownson
Boston, Mass(achusetts)

Some time ago he wrote to Brownson in behalf of the Young Men's Institute in New Haven, inviting him to lecture before them in the coming fall or winter. The letter was directed to New York, as he supposed Brownson had moved there. This he sends to Boston. He tried to get Brownson an invitation from another institution, but failed solely because arrangements could not be completed before Brownson left Hartford. He explains that the Young Men's Institute is a literary society which they are trying to establish upon a strong foundation. Should Brownson accept the invitation, he would like to hear his terms. He advises that the institute is poor, and that Brownson can save expense by lecturing here about the time that he is in New York.
I-3-f A.L.S. 2pp. 8vo.
1


1842 Nov 5

Morning Advertiser
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

To Bishop (Anthony) Blanc
(New Orleans, Louisiana)

Receipted bill for $20 for publishing communication relative to the controversy with the marguillers of St. Louis Cathedral and 20 extra copies. M. Hassard received payment for W. Snethen and Company.

V-4-m A. Receipt S. 2pp. 8vo.
4


1842 Nov 6

Generes, J.C. De
Hydropolis, (Louisiana)

to Bishop (Anthony) Blanc
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

De Generes asks to use Blanc's name as a reference to the support of this young establishment. He has enlarged his building and can now accommodate 16 young ladies. He intends to receive Madame Le Duc, highly recommended by Madame Burth(e) as an assistant to his daughters. He begs Blanc's influence in recommending this school to those gentlemen whom Blanc knows at Natchitoches.
(On the back of this letter in pencil are the following names): Z. Cavelier, T. Mossy, L. Garidel, Ch. Daron, Oct. Des Armas, G. Boyer, A. Pelier(?), B. Blanchet, H. Kernion, N. Jourdan.

V-4-m A.L.S. 2pp. 4to.
5


1842 Nov 8

Mackenzie, W(illia)m L.
N(ew) York, (New York)

To O(restes) A. Brownson
Boston, (Massachusetts)

The bearer of this note, Mr. Panins of Buffalo, has promised to call on Brownson during a stay in Boston, and to return any answer that Brownson may be pleased to send to Mr. Ewbank's letter which requests Brownson to favor this Society with a brief discourse when he comes there next month.

I-3-f A.L.S. 1p. 8vo.
1


1842 Nov 9

Brownson, O(restes) A.
Chelsea, (Massachusetts)

To R(alph) W. Emerson
Concord, Mass(achusetts)

Brownson regrets that a previous engagement prevents him from meeting Emerson at his home the next evening. He is engaged to address the good people of Nantucket. He asks Emerson to make his respects to Messrs. Sam Alcott and Wright and tell them that he would listen to them with interest in ameliorating man's special condition although he must say that he has long since ceased to have any faith in any actual or possible scheme of world reform. The world jogs along in its own way with or without their cooperation. The perfect state is incompatible with the imperfection of individuals will be imperfect until they cease to be finite. All that remains is to make the best out of our present. He apologizes for philosophizing in this way. He has worn out the best part of his life in devising schemes of world reform and to no purpose. He intends to withdraw to discuss the great truths of philosophy and history. He avows his respect for Emerson and his increasing sympathy with Emerson's view which he has at times been disposed to combat.

I-4-h A.L.S. (Xerox copy from Harvard College Library) 4pp. 16mo. 1


1842 Nov 9

Walter, W.J., British Consulate
Philadelphia, (Pennsylvania)

To Bishop (Anthony) Blanc
(New Orleans, Louisiana)

Walter avails himself of the departure of Louis Gros to acknowledge Blanc's kind sentiments expressed in his last letter. He in common with Blanc has to express his sorrow for the present position of things. He laments the failure of a literary project; Blanc has commenced an undertaking which will, Walter fears, weigh heavily. Blanc will the more forcibly face this in looking on the portrait of Pius V of which Walter encloses copies. The artist is an English friend of Walter. The price of the plain copies is 25 cents; the India paper 50 cents. Mrs. Walter joins in regards.

V-4-m A.L.S. 3pp. 4to.
2


1842 Nov 10

Tabor, Martha M.
Lafourche, (Louisiana)

To (Bishop Anthony Blanc
New Orleans, Louisiana)

Tabor's sister has been in bad health all summer so that all her household duties have devolved on Martha. She is now in better health. Nothing would give Martha more pleasure than to hear from (Blanc) her godfather. The distance to church is so great that they cannot at all times have a conveyance to get there. Father (Charles M.) Menard is well and comes down sometimes in the neighborhood but Martha has never seen him. (Blanc) is to let her know if he has heard from Father (Julian) Priour lately. Her mother and family are in tolerable health.
V-4-m A.L.S. 1p. 4to.
3


1842 Nov 12

Doherty, John J.
Rose Hill College, New York

to Bishop John Baptist Purcell
of Cincinnati, Ohio

He has deferred his answer to Purcell's of October 20, until he had seen Bishop (John) Hughes, who was at the time he arrived engaged in a retreat. Hughes has left him perfectly free and while he is grateful to Hughes he feels a definite aversion to the New York diocese. He has little that he can add except that he awaits the word of Purcell as to the time and circumstances of his going to Cincinnati.
P.S. The Archbishop of Camerino, Nuncio to Columbia, South America visited New York and at the invitation of Bishop Francis Patrick Kenrick also visited Philadelphia. He has sailed for Havre de Grace with Father Ariotto, C.M., who could not stand the climate.
II-4-h A.L.S. 2pp. 8vo.
7


1842 Nov 13

Lutz, Father Jos(eph) A.
St. Louis, (Missouri)

To Father E(tienne) Rousselon
New Orleans, L(ouisia)na

The reply to Rousselon's letter about the ordos and sending two boxes, has been slowed up by the delay in the departure of Mr. Rigg who was to be the bearer of the $42. Lutz believes Rigg has given Rousselon the amount probably a little late because of difficulties on the river. The 50 Masses have been said. As to other expenses specified in Rousselon's letter of October 14, which he paid for them by giving them 45 more Masses, he has rendered them a real service. The Coadjutor, Bishop (Peter Richard Kenrick) is still absent; he is very grateful to Rousselon.

V-4-m A.L.S. (French) 2pp. 4to.
3


1842 Nov 13

McLaughlin, Father Peter
(Cleveland, Ohio)

to Bishop John Baptist Purcell
of Cincinnati, Ohio

He could not attend Father (Joseph) McNamee at Tiffin because on the day chosen by McNamee he had arranged to visit his stations as well as for the eight days following. One lady died while he was at retreat but she had received before he went. The people in Cleveland are getting wealthy. Cuyahoga Falls prospers even more than Cleveland. The trouble with Mrs. Golden continues. He offers to pay all if he be given a clear receipt in his own name or that of Mr. Parks but she refuses. At Liverpool he intends to visit only the log church, but will let Purcell choose his own. At Randolph, he proposes to choose the unfinished church and take sides if Purcell approves. He now lives at Mr. Howe's.
P.S. The Protestants are mad against the Catholics. He was at home at seven o'clock Saturday.

II-4-h A.L.S. 3pp. 8vo.
7


1842 Nov 14

Channing, R.G.; Channing, Wm. F.
Boston, Mass(achusetts)

To Rev. O(restes) A. Brownson
Boston, (Massachusetts)

The Rev. Dr. (William E.) Channing has died and it is the desire of his friends to collect his correspondence and all materials from which the most perfect view of his life and character can be drawn. Brownson is requested to loan the letters which have been written to him by Channing and to communicate any acts or traits, illustrative of Dr. Channing's life.

I-3-f L.S. (Printed) 2pp. 8vo.
1


1842 Nov 16

(Chanche), Bishop John Joseph
Natchez, (Mississippi)

To Bishop (Anthony) Blanc
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

Blanc must already have received his letter acknowledging the reception of the drafts on Paris. He was grieved to learn that Blanc was obliged to come to such an extremity with the trustees. By this measure Blanc will be enabled to take a considerable part of the revenue out of their hands. (Chanche) has received a letter from Father (Guillaume) L'abbé; his success has been much greater than (Chanche) had anticipated. After his retreat at the Bay, he had thirty communicants and performed 50 baptisms. (Chanche) expects to visit L'abbé after Christmas. Has Blanc any fasting days during Advent; Blanc is to let him know what is the usage.

V-4-m A.L.S. 3pp. 4to.
2


1842 Nov 18

(Fenwick), Bishop Benedict (Joseph)
Boston, (Massachusetts)

To Bishop (Anthony) Blanc
New Orleans, Louisiana

It is a long time since (Fenwick) received Blanc's request, in behalf of Mrs. Ruddock, to transmit to her the proceeds of a savings bank book which she left in the hands of Father M(ichael) Healy. The difficulty arises from Healy's death in Montreal leaving the Superior of the Seminary there his executor. The Superior empowered Mr. (Kilchen) Kielchen, then Russian consul of Boston, to settle Healy's affairs. Kielchen has been sent to Sweden. The book, however, is in (Fenwick's) possession. The one course left is to obtain from the Superior of Montreal a power of attorney to draw this money. How much (Fenwick) feels for Blanc under his present trials. Have not the parishioners the power to put out such infidels and elect truly Catholic trustees? He finds he is not the only Bishop to experience trials! Their (Sister) Mary Benedict (Barber?) remains as obstinate as ever. Ever since the departure of (Sister) Mary Austin (O'Keefe?), (Fenwick) has charged her to repair to some convent where she may live like a religious but she disobeys and will not let go! She is keeping a little school with O'Kief and his wife in the same house.
(A note in another hand at the end of the letter): John Ruddock lives in Covington.

V-4-m A.L.S. 4pp. 4to.
7


1842 Nov 22

Vivien
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

To Bishop (Anthony Blanc
New Orleans, Louisiana)

Vivien encloses a letter from Bishop (John Mary Odin, C.M.) of Texas and takes this occasion to recommend to (Blanc) an unfortunate artist and Father of a family who has no other income but his talent. Not being known in this country he has been without work for a long time. He is persuaded that (Blanc) would like him to do his portrait or talk to someone about their portrait or other pictures.
(P.S.) He could not deliver the bishop's letter on his arrival because he caught such a cold on the steamboat he got a fever which kept him in bed two days.

A.L.S. (French) 2pp. 8vo.

Enclosure:

--------
1842 Nov 16

(Odin), Bishop John Mary
Galveston, (Texas)

To Bishop A(nthony) Blanc
New Orleans, L(ouisian)a

(Odin) has just arrived from Houston. He finished the jubilee exercises last Sunday; however the confusion which reigns throughout the country is a great obstacle to good. He intended to preach the jubilee along the Brazos but the rains during 3 or 4 months make the roads impassable. He has learned with much regret that the trustees of Blanc's cathedral have begun again to cause him trouble. (Odin) would like to be able to attend the future council in Baltimore but he has received no reply to the letter he wrote to Archbishop (Samuel) Eccleston. What should (Odin) do if he received no reply? (On the back of the letter in Blanc's hand): Cathed(ral), Fathers Maenh(aut), Jamey, D'Hauw, Walsh, A. Faure, Mascaroni, Moracchini; St. Augus(tine), Raviol, Lunel; St. Mary, Rousselon, Billon.
A.L.S. (French) 2pp. 4to.

V-4-m A.L.S. (French) 4pp. 8vo. & 4to.
4


1842 Nov 24

Brownson, O(restes) A.
Chelsea, (Massachusetts)

To (Mrs. George Sophia Ripley
Brook Farm, West Roxbury, Massachusetts)

Brownson's son (Orestes A. Brownson, Jr.) tells him that she has been so kind as on several occasions to notice him and to encourage him. Any regard she may show to him, he shall take as shown to himself. (Gift of Daniel R. Barnes, June 18, 1968)>

I-3-c Transcript (original in University of Virginia Library) 1p. 4to. 3


1842 Nov 25

Lesne, Father J(ames)
N(ew) O(rleans, Louisiana)

To Bishop (Anthony) Blanc
(New Orleans, Louisiana)

The bearer of this letter, Edward Lavergne, asks Lesne to bless his marriage tomorrow evening. Does Blanc have any objection to this or to giving a dispensation from the time? He is to answer by the bearer who has already fulfilled all other requirements. (Blanc writes on the letter): Petition granted.

V-4-m A.L.S. (French) 2pp. 4to.
2


1842 Nov 25

(Odin), Bishop John Mary
Galveston, (Texas)

To Bishop A(nthony) Blanc
New Orleans, L(ouisian)a

(Odin) introduces William C. Byrne, a Catholic merchant of Galveston and a particular acquaintance. He will probably need to leave in New Orleans a box containing some gold and silver and (Odin) thought that Blanc or Father (Stephen) Rousselon would do him the favor to take charge of it. Some weeks ago Byrne advanced (Odin) $100 for which he gave Byrne a draft on Rousselon. (Odin) has heard that Rousselon was no more in New Orleans. If the draft is as yet unpaid, Blanc would oblige by advancing the amount on presentation of said draft.

V-4-m A.L.S. (French) 2pp. 4to.
3


1842 Nov 25

(Odin), Father John Mary
Galveston, Texas

to Father E(tienne) Rousselon
New Orleans, L(ouisian)a

(Odin) wrote last from Houston to tell him about the draft for $100 on Rousselon which (Odin) had given to William C. Byrne. If the order has not yet been presented will Rousselon honor it? (Odin) has only one more debt, $87 to settle for the church at Houston and $60 for the one at Galveston. If Father (Bonaventure) Armengol could pay these two, Rousselon is to let (Odin) know. Have the Ursulines given Rousselon the 100 piastres they promised (Odin)? There are so many needs for poor Texas. Byrne, who will give Rousselon this letter, has a little box; (Odin) will be obliged if Rousselon will take care of it. Byrne has done several favors for (Odin). (Odin) is writing to Father (John) Timon and sends the letter to Rousselon thinking Timon may be at New Orleans.

V-4-m A.L.S. (French) 3pp. 12mo.
8


1842 Nov 27

L(ynch), Anne C.
Providence, (Rhode Island)

To O(restes) A. Brownson
Boston, Mass(achusetts)

She read the last Review and cannot say that she agrees with Brownson. Perhaps she may come around to his point of view. Besides she does not have a metaphysical mind. She went to New York to have some poems published in the Democratic Review but did not see O'Sullivan. Everybody in New York seems so cold and selfish. She was much pleased with Brownson's article on the community. She hears that Brownson has encountered the English transcendentalists.
I-3-f A.L.S. 3pp. 8vo.
1


1842 Nov 28

Brownson, O(restes) A.
Chelsea, (Massachusetts)

To (Isaac T. Hecker)
(New York, New York)

Brownson will be in New York on December 6; he intends to lecture at the Tabernacle that evening, and in Brooklyn the following Thursday, and must leave Friday for home. Mr. McKensie has asked Brownson to lecture on Thursday before the Mechanics Institute. Brownson has put him off hoping to find a more agreeable time, but he can find no free date but Wednesday, the 7th. If Hecker should see Mr. Gordon connected with the Mercantile Library Association, he should tell him that he may say to Mr. Van Cott that Brownson will choose for his subject in Brooklyn: "The Law of the Progress of Humanity." Brownson will stay with Hecker.

I-4-g A.L.S. (Photostat, Paulist Archives)

--------
1p. 8vo.
1


1842 Nov 28

(Chanche), Bishop John Joseph
Natchez, (Mississippi)

To Bishop (Anthony) Blanc
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

(Chanche) thanks Blanc for the information about Advent in his letter of the 21st. He regrets to learn that Blanc's difficulties with the trustees are not yet at an end. (Chanche) has very little acquaintance in New Orleans but if Blanc thinks he can be of any use, he is to command his services. (Chanche) will be in New Orleans immediately after Christmas on his way to Bay St. Louis. He will want a vestment and maybe some other things; will Blanc lend them to him?

V-4-m A.L.S. 3pp. 4to.
2


1842 Nov 28

Garland, Hugh A.
Petersburg, V(irginia)

To O(restes) A. Brownson
Boston, Mass(achusetts)

In Brownson alone he has found correspondence of thought and feeling. Brownson has furnished the lofty ideal for which his soul has been longing. Only from Brownson can he hope to learn the truth. He wishes to know something about the school (Brook Farm), Brownson speaks of in the "Democratic Review." He has six children to send to school. He is satisfied as to intellectual and physical education offered but wonders what moral stamp will be given the character. He asks if it is safe to send his daughters to the school. In sending them, he will have to break through the vitiated prejudices of the Southern people.
I-3-f A.L.S. 4pp. 8vo.
2


1842 Nov 29

Armengol, Father B(onaventure)
Assumption, (Louisiana)

To Father (Stephen) Rousselon
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

They are without money for the last payment on their Negress, $270 due tomorrow. He asks Rousselon to send $200 by Captain Streck. Rousselon is to greet the Bishop who will be pleased to hear that (Adrien) Rouquette is very much pleased and his health is much better. They lack Numbers 79, 80 and 81 of the (Annals) of the Propagation of the Faith. Father (John) Boullier, (C.M.) has not received any for a long time.
(On the back of the letter Rousselon notes that) $200 was sent December 1.

V-4-m A.L.S. (French) 2pp. 4to.
4


1842 Nov 29

Boullier, C.M., Father J(ohn)
Donaldsonville, (Louisiana)

To Bishop (Anthony) Blanc
New Orleans, L(ouisian)a

Boullier hastens to reply to Blanc's letter of the 25th. He did not reply to Blanc's two preceding letters because of illness. He sends enclosed (no enclosure) a copy of the statutes of the (Archconfraternity of the Immaculate) Heart of Mary; they have almost 500 members. He has written to Paris for cards; if it is possible to procure any at New Orleans he will pay for them or replace them when his come. This Archconfraternity is destined to produce great good. He sent the statutes to Paris along with Blanc's approbation. The reply sent by the pastor of Notre dame des Victoires, Father Desgenettes, dated June 4, did not reach Boullier until the end of October. Boullier sympathizes in Blanc's trials. He saw with great pleasure the new paper edited so capably by Father (Napoleon Joseph) Perché. He has only $10 worth of subscriptions but he received the first and third numbers only this week.

V-4-m A.L.S. (French) 3pp. 4to.
4


1842 Nov 29

Stevens, Dr. Alex(ander) H(odgdon)
New York, (New York)

Doctor Guy C(arleton) Bailey has long been known to Stevens as a gentleman of high character and professional standing. Bailey's Father was full of sacrifice to the zealous discharge of his duties as health officer in New York. Bailey is qualified for any official station to which he may aspire.
(Notes of concurrence in the above are signed by) Dr. John B. Beck, Dr. Valentine Mott, Dr. T.(?) McLean(?), John C. Chrisman, and Edw(ard) Delafield, (the last note dated) December 9, 1842.
II-2-n A.L.S. 2pp. 8vo.
6


1842 Nov 30

Gordon, Cuthbert C.]
New York, (New York)

To O(restes) A. Brownson
Boston, Mass(achusetts)

He expects that Brownson will be present at the Tabernacle Thursday next for his lecture on government. If, through illness, he is unable to be present, he would like to be informed as early as possible. He expects, also, that the following Thursday night Brownson will be present to give the same lecture to the Hamilton Literary Association, Brooklyn according to Gordon's agreement with (J.W.) Van Cott. He can guarantee an audience of about 1500 people; and he looks forward to seeing Brownson at the appointed place and time.

I-3-f A.L.S. 1p. 8vo.
1


1842 Nov 30

Hughes, Bishop John
New York, (New York)

To Bishop (Anthony) Blanc
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

Hughes introduces Thomas C. Healy, a young Catholic artist of Boston, who has made up his mind to visit New Orleans in the way of his profession. He is an artist of merit.

V-4-m A.L.S. 2pp. 4to.
2


(1842 Dec 1)

(L'Abeille), New Orleans Bee
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

To Bishop (Anthony) Blanc
(New Orleans, Louisiana)

A receipt for $12 for 12 months subscription from December 1, 1842 to December 1, 1843.
Signed by Morton Quirk.

V-4-m Receipt S. 1p. 32mo.
2


1842 Dec 1

(Eccleston), Samuel, Archbishop of Baltimore
Baltimore, Maryland

to Bishop John Baptist Purcell
of Cincinnati, Ohio

A circular letter announcing that according to the Council of 1840 the next Provincial Council (1843) would meet on the fourth Sunday after Easter, May 14, in Baltimore, and urging the bishops to send their suggestion about the matter to be considered.

L.S. 1p. 8vo. (Latin)

To this Eccleston adds the following:

Eccleston also asks Purcell to give the closing discourse May 21 and at the requests of the people of Baltimore to give several other lectures while attending the council. The Catholic Telegraph announced the appointment of Father (Michael) O'Connor to Charleston, S.C. Eccleston desires to know if Purcell has later word than he since Bishop (Joseph) Rosati had said that he would not be appointed before September, and Cardinal Franzoni had said September 3, that no one was yet chosen. On the request of the Cardinal he now presents three names for that see:
1. ^Father John McElroy, S.J., of Maryland Province,
2. Father Michael O'Connor of Philadelphia diocese and,
3. James M. Lancaster of the diocese of Louisville.
Eccleston would like to know if Father O'Connor has been appointed and if not he wants Purcell's opinion on the men mentioned. He hopes that Purcell will be able to spend some weeks in Baltimore.
II-4-h A.L.S. 3pp. 8vo.
10


1842 Dec 1

Lefevre, Peter Paul, Bishop of Detroit
Detroit, Michigan

to Bishop John Baptist Purcell of Cincinnati, Ohio
He speaks at length of the trials and difficulties he has experienced which nearly caused him to resign. The French congregation caused so much trouble that he announced from the pulpit that unless they opposed the league then being formed he and his clergy would go to another part of the city and consider the French congregation extinct. Another source of trouble has been Father Francis Vincent Badin, whom he indicates practiced simony and extortion, converting to his own use the property of the late Father J. Debruyn and using the Cathedral money for the Indian Missions. Badin has since his departure appointed a doctor his attorney to collect two large sums which he claims for his work from 1832 to 1841. Lefevre knows that he has received more than he deserves, having given him $100 himself more than he spent. Also the rumor is that he was married before becoming a priest and has sons living. Lefevre asks Purcell to try to bring Badin to his senses if he is in Cincinnati.

II-4-h A.L.S. 2pp. 8vo.
6


1842 Dec 1

L(ynch), A(nne) C.
Providence, (Rhode Island)

To (Orestes A. Brownson
Boston, Massachusetts)

Brownson must be getting very savage to scold her the way he does. She begs him to stop off with them for dinner on his way to N(ew) Y(ork). She doesn't know how the trains run, but she expects him on the morning train from Boston some day next week.

I-3-f A.L.S. 1p. 8vo.
1


1842 Dec 1

Tschenhenss, C.SS.R., Father Francis X.
Norwalk, Ohio

to Bishop John Baptist Purcell
of Cincinnati, Ohio

He has been making a retreat according to his rule. He asks Purcell to send him the deed for Thompson because the lines are in dispute and he intends to go there January 1, but fears to go without the deed. From there he will go to Tiffin and have Father (Joseph) McNamee come to Norwalk where there are about ten English speaking families. The jubilee at Pittsburgh kept him two weeks. Father P. Allig has not returned. He supplemented his jubilee by working on the lost sheep bringing in thirty of them. He is not liked by Tschenhenss party because he seems to favor the other party.

II-4-h A.L.S. 1p. 8vo.
6


1842 Dec 2

Parker, Theodore
West Roxbury, (Massachusetts)

To O(restes) A. Brownson
Boston, (Massachusetts)

Since completing his course of sermons delivered in Boston, he has just carefully read Brownson's large and elaborate article on his (Parker's) book. He wishes to thank Brownson for his kindness and respect. They both differ widely on many points. He says, however, that there is one thing that he has long intended to do and that is to write a review of Brownson's journal, treating of the writings under three heads: Philosophical, theological, Ethico-Political.
I-3-f A.L.S. 3pp. 8vo.
1


1842 Dec 3

Mollun
Havana, (Cuba)

To Bishop (Anthony Blanc
New Orleans, Louisiana)

Bishop (Ramon Casaus y Torres), administrator of Cuba is informed of the contents of the letter which Blanc wrote to Mollun. The bishop hastens to reply that should the occasion arise, he will make it his duty to consider Blanc's request.

V-4-m A.L.S. (French) 1p. Folio
2


1842 Dec 8

Alig, Father Matthew
Norwalk, Ohio

to Bishop John Baptist Purcell
of Cincinnati, Ohio

According to the mandate of his superior he has returned to Norwalk and he wants to avoid disturbance by his return. He gave Purcell an account of the German congregation at Norwalk before his departure to Buffalo, N.Y., for the jubilee and since Father F.X. Tschenhenss was also away the conditions have not changed. He does not think it proper for two priests to be in Norwalk because of the dissensions among the people and asks that he be permitted to depart since Father Tschenhenss returned first. He suggests that Purcell so inform the Redemptorists' superior who is now setting out for Europe. In sending him to Norwalk his superior destined him with Father Tschenhenss for the mission in Ohio. These letters were sent to Father (Martin Henni) for Purcell. Alig asks for an abolition of his obligation to remain at Norwalk.

II-4-h A.L.S. 1p. 8vo. (Latin)
5


1842 Dec 8

(Chanche), Bishop John Joseph
Natchez, (Mississippi)

To Bishop (Anthony) Blanc
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

(Chanche) received Blanc's letter of the 2nd. He is glad Blanc does not need his services before Christmas. He thinks he will leave Tuesday after Christmas. He will be happy to make the address on January 8; anything he can do to help Blanc out of his difficulties will find him ready. (Chanche) does not know anything of his Legislature but anything Blanc suggests he will endeavor to accomplish. (Chanche) understands that Blanc's condescension in saying Mass on the feast of St. Barbara has produced a very good effect. (Chanche) received Father (Ghislain) Boheme's letter; he accepts his services with pleasure. He wold be glad if Boheme went to Paulding which is the place (Chanche) destined for Father (Albino) Desgaultière. There are very few Catholics in Paulding but a gentleman there has given ground to build a church. There are already $2000 subscribed besides a promise to support a priest. Bishop (Michael) Portier who interest himself in that congregation can give Boheme more information than (Chanche) can. If Blanc advises Boheme to go to Paulding before (Chanche) goes to New Orleans, (Chanche) would be obliged to Blanc to furnish him with the means.

V-4-m A.L.S. 4pp. 4to.
5


1842 Dec 9

Frenaye, M(ark) A.
Philadelphia, (Pennsylvania)

To Bishop Anthony Blanc
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

Frenaye received Blanc's letter about the two boxes sent Blanc from Havre. Choiselat Gallien's intention was to address them to Frenaye and so he sent him the bills of lading. Since Desponds have informed Frenaye that they changed the destination, Frenaye hastened to write to the persons who are to receive them. Box 161 belongs to the University of St. Louis, Box 162 to Father (J.M.) Bonniot at New Orleans. He believes his letters were written November 21. A few days after the date of Blanc's letter Bonniot claimed Number 162 and St. Louis also claimed 161. Frenaye is not a priest, but he lives with the Bishop and is happy to be of help to the clergy. They have heard of Blanc's troubles; Blanc will be victorious. St. Mary's in Philadelphia, years ago, had a similar scandal but all has been in order long since. The Bishop did not yield an inch. He kept silent and prayed after withdrawing the priests.
(P.S.) Frenaye would like all the bishops to have religious newspapers as they have the Catholic Herald. They rejoice at the establishment of the Propagateur (Catholique). Blanc thus has the means of making the truth known without putting episcopal dignity in contact with that of the trustees.

V-4-m A.L.S. (French) 3pp. 4to.
6


1842 Dec 9

Tabor, Martha M.
Lafourche, (Louisiana)

To Bishop (Anthony) Blanc
New Orleans, L(ouisian)a

Her mother died on November 17. They all feel a full assurance that she is in the company of the just. Martha has been sick for nearly one month but feels a little better now. Her brother-in-law is like a Father to her. All her sisters are at home yet but will leave there in a few days. They will go into families to live; Martha will remain with her sister who is married. Her step-Father is expected to die. She hopes Blanc, her godfather, will not delay in answering her letter.
V-4-m A.L.S. 3pp. 4to.
1


1842 Dec 9

Tefft, B.F.

To (Orestes A. Brownson)
Boston, Mass(achusetts)

He says that he is a friend of Philosophy, and since he knows Brownson is ardently devoted to truth, he has been very desirous of making his acquaintance. Twice he has called at Brownson's with Rev. A. Stevens, but his attempts were unsuccessful. He now writes requesting that Brownson name a convenient day so that he may have an interview with him at his house, or an hour when Brownson could call at his house.

I-3-f A.L.S. 1p. 8vo.
1


1842 Dec 10

Foulon, C.V.
(New Orleans, Louisiana)

To Bishop Anthony Blanc
(New Orleans, Louisiana)

A bill for $17 for services as notary on January 13 for recording a private agreement; on December 6 for an agreement with Depouilly and Goudchaux; on December 10 for a receipt by Charles Gerard. Approved by D.(?) Seghers, assistant. Lewis Quemper signs as receiving payment for Foulon.

V-4-m Bill (French) 1p. 12mo.
6


1842 Dec 10

(Odin), Bishop John Mary
Galveston, (Texas)

to Father E(tienne) Rousselon
New Orleans, L(ouisian)a

(Odin) received the package Rousselon sent; he has already begun to say the Masses. He read the first numbers of the Propagateur Catholique with interest. Rousselon is to register (Odin's) subscription as well as that of Peter J. Ménard. He will pay when he goes through New Orleans toward the end of March. News from the western part of Texas is very sad. Since the withdrawal of the Mexicans, a large number of Texans have gathered at San Antonio, with a view of carrying on hostilities on the other side of the Rio Grande. This project is ridiculous but lacking everything at home they thought it would be better to live at the expense of the poor Mexicans. They steal, pillage, burn the houses and commit the most revolting outrages. Almost 200 Mexican families have already had to leave Texas and many more will soon seek refuge in other countries. (Odin) sends his respects to the Bishop and other priests.

V-4-m A.L.S. (French) 2pp. 4to.
4


1842 Dec 11

(Hailandière), Celestine (de), Bishop of
(Vincennes, Indiana)

To Bishop Peter (Paul) Lefev(e)re
Detroit, Michigan

Hailandière asks why he should be offended by Lefevere's silence. They should be rather consoled that they have offended neither God nor a brother. He is astonished at the contrarities in the path of Lefevere but the previous history of poor Detroit could not make things otherwise and Lefevere has the weapons and must defend the kingdom of God. The bishops of flourishing dioceses must also have their trials, such as Bishop (Anthony Blanc) of New Orleans. Hailandière participates in Lefevere's trials. They will have a happy ending. If Father (Francis Vincent) Badin goes away rich from a mission which lives on alms will he not be so represented? Badin did not go to Vincennes but Hailandière met him at Louisville last week. He prepares to go to France. Hailandière, if he were in Lefevere's place, would write to Father (Stephen) Theodore Badin, his brother, at Louisville and again to the Bishop of Orleans France, where he goes to retire, and to all other bishops he knows to bring the matter to the attention of the bishop of Orleans. He would send to Rome to get an order against Badin. Father (Louis) Dufour, if he returns to Rome, could carry the message for Lefevere since he has complained of Badin to Hailandière. Hailandière asks for prayers, saying he needs them most.
P.S. Hailandière has sent to South Bend (Indiana), Father (Edward Frederick) Sorin. Sorin goes to found a college and a novitiate for the Brothers of Holy Cross. He recommends Sorin to Lefevere. He has given him faculties for the part of Lefevere's diocese at his doorstep and suggests that Lefevere change or restrict his jurisdiction.
III-2-g A.L.S. (French) 3pp. 8vo.
8


1842 Dec 11

(Kenrick), Peter Richard (Coadjutor) B(isho)p (of St. Louis) St. Louis, M(iss)o(uri)

To Bishop (Peter Paul) Lefevere
Detroit, Michigan

Having just received Lefevere's letter of (December) 9, Kenrick loses no time in acknowledging it. He neglected to reply to an earlier one because he was absent from St. Louis almost constantly since Easter. He is sending Lefevere a Pastoral address which he made to his people concerning the seminary, now at St. Louis. His only hope of completing Trinity Church is in Father (John) Timon to whom he has made an offer. Father (George) Hamilton has laid the foundation of a new church in the northern part of the city, the lot for which was given by Mrs. ( ) Biddle, and to which Mrs. ( ) Mullanphy has subscribed $1000. Kenrick expresses his opinion about Father (John) Kenny; of the rumors about his addiction to drink; of his appointment to Galena (Illinois); and his dismissal. Kenrick regrets that Father (Francis Vincent) Badin has disappointed Lefevere, and hopes Lefevere will not pay his demand. Kenrick does not believe Badin's attorney would be able to succeed at law. He hopes to find Lefevere in St. Louis on his return from Arkansas. He is glad Lefevere's firmness put a stop to the disturbers of the peace about whom he wrote. What great evils (Bishop Anthony Blanc) of New Orleans has to struggle with. God grant that out of this scandal lasting peace may arise! Kenrick received a letter from Bishop (John Baptist Purcell) of Cincinnati. (Purcell) is displeased with Father (Michael) O'Connor's nomination to the See of Charleston (South Carolina), because the rule of the council was not followed. Kenrick states what he believes are the facts: that unfavorable information about the first of the three persons recommended by the late Bishop (John England) of Charleston was communicated to the Archbishop (Samuel Eccleston of Baltimore) and to Bishop (Joseph) Rosati (of St. Louis). Rosati then proposed O'Connor without the knowledge of (Bishop Francis Patrick Kenrick). He mentions this lest Lefevere should think O'Connor's nomination was effected by Kenrick's brother, or with his concurrence and consent. Kenrick has been obliged to dismiss Father (Timothy) Conway and Father (Charles) Meyer. Meyer continued to exercise his ministry after withdrawal of faculties, and published an insulting letter in the German paper. Kenrick has since then learned other unfavorable facts about him. All this shows that St. Louis has its difficulties as well as Detroit.
P.S. Father (Stephen Theodore) Badin is in Lexington or some other part of Kentucky.
(Note on first page by Lefevere indicates that this letter was answered February 15, 1843).

III-2-g A.L.S. 4pp. 8vo.
18


1842 Dec 12

(Portier), Bishop Michael
Mobile, (Alabama)

To Father (Stephen) Rousselon
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

(Portier) sends a letter of exchange which he asks Rousselon to give, with the letter enclosed, to Suzette Grissom, at the home of Th. Barret in Bourgoyne street near the Peyroux ladies. It is to buy things for the orphans. Rousselon is to warn the Bishop that he will receive a visit from an Irish priest named Waters who spent several months in (Portier's) diocese and whom he found a bad subject. (Portier) plans to go soon to New Orleans.

V-4-m A.L.S. (French) 2pp. 4to.
4


1842 Dec 13

(Eccleston), Archbishop Samuel
Baltimore, (Maryland)

To Bishop (Anthony) Blanc
New Orleans, L(ouisiana)

The Bishops of this Province in council in 1840, fixed the next Provincial Council for May 14, 1843. They are to send in any questions they may wish to be discussed.

Form. L. (Latin) 1p.

On the same paper:

--------
(1842)

(Eccleston), Archbishop Samuel
(Baltimore, Maryland)

to Bishop (Anthony) Blanc
New Orleans, L(ouisian)a

(Eccleston) spoke to Chief Justice Roger (Brooke) Taney relative to Blanc's Cathedral property. Taney answered that as the case might come before the Supreme Court he was not at liberty to satisfy (Eccleston's) questions. The Telegraph of Cincinnati has announced the appointment of Father (Michael) O'Connor, (S.J.) to the See of Charleston. (Eccleston) thinks the announcement premature although such will probably be the result. A short time before, (Eccleston) had transmitted to Cardinal (James Philip) Franzoni three names for that station: Father J(ohn) McElroy, S.J., O'Connor of Philadelphia, and Father J(ames) M. Lancaster of Louisville. He added that he thought it would be better to defer the recommendation until they could make it more advisedly at the next council.

A.L.S. 2pp.

V-4-m Form L. (Latin) A.L.S. 3pp. 4to.
6


1842 Dec 13

Lucas, F(ielding) Jr.
Baltimore, (Maryland)

To Bishop A(nthony) Blanc
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

Lucas sends a parcel containing 100 Catholic Almanacs for the next year. (The bill for $18.75 is at the top of the letter). He presumes Blanc would require the same number that he usually had.
(P.S.) The parcel was put on board the Brig Ada and not the Irad Ferry.

V-4-m A.L.S. 2pp. 4to.
1


1842 Dec 13

(Purcell), Bishop J(ohn) B(aptist)
Cin(cinnati, Ohio)

To Bishop Ant(hony) Blanc
New Orleans, L(ouisian)a

Everyone is rushing down to New Orleans so there is no lack of opportunity to send a letter if one has time to write it. It is really a pleasure to see that Blanc has started a Catholic paper. It has "verve" in the two numbers (Purcell) has received. Encompassed as Blanc is with scorpions he needed a scourge of fire to last them. In the first article (of the Propagateur Catholique) it strikes (Purcell) that a mistake is made in saying that none but Greek and Latin writers are reputed Doctors of the Church; Ephrem who wrote in neither was one of the most illustrious. Another slight blemish, in (Purcell's) way of thinking, will be the continuance of the ads - "A mulatto for sale, or hire." The main object of (Purcell's) letter is to put Blanc and his clergy on guard against lending money to a certain De Felhorn and wife who have gone from Cincinnati to New Orleans, leaving plenty of gaping creditors behind. (Purcell) hopes Blanc will come up this way this spring on his way to the fourth or fifth Pr(ovincial) Council. Father (Michael) O'Connor's nomination to Charleston was unknown to (Purcell) until he heard of it from France. He is a most worthy and learned priest but their way of doing business after so much legislation, is anomalous. It is said by the two Badins, (Father Francis Vincent Badin) and (Father Stephen Theodore Badin) who were in Cincinnati this week, that Bishop (Peter Paul) Lefevere has given up to the State of Michigan nearly all the lands of the Church as they were not worth paying taxes, which are enormous there. "Sic transit sapientia (Bishop Frederick) Résé."

V-4-m A.L.S. (Part French) 3pp. 4to
8


1842 Dec 13

Sautois, (S.J.), Father F(lorian) J.(?)
Grand Coteau, (Louisiana)

To Father (Stephen) Rousselon
(New Orleans, Louisiana)

He has received the money from two new units for the
Association of the Propagation of the Faith, $15. He thinks Father (Victor) Jamey will bring this little sum.
(P.S.) He sends his respects to the Bishop and Fathers Jamey, Maenhaut, and Walsh.

V-4-m A.L.S. (French) 2pp. 12mo.
3


1842 Dec 15

(Loras), Mathias B(isho)p of Dubuque
Dubuque, (Iowa Territory)

To (Bishop Peter Paul Lefevere)
(Detroit, Michigan)

Loras acknowledges Lefevere's favor of November 30. After reflection he adds to what Bishop (Peter Richard) Kenrick says the M.K. (Father John Kenny) is given to lying and has given scandal at Galena. If he is repentant Lefevere could try him for a month. The general rule adopted by the Bishop of Dubuque with regard to strange priests is to allow one year's trial during which he could leave or the bishop dismiss him. Loras deplores the conduct of Father (Vincent F.) Badin, and explains the regulation adopted by himself in synod to obviate such conduct. The regulations cover salaries, Mass intentions, collections, and surplus funds. This rule has, so far, preserved his priests in a spirit of disinterestedness and zeal. Loras considers Lefevere's severe measure concerning the St. Anne Congregation (Detroit, Michigan) as the best, which along with those adopted by B(isho)p (Anthony) Blanc of N(ew) Orl(eans) will support the wise measures of B(isho)p (John) Hughes. Loras is about to conclude (a deal) on the English catechisms. He will keep 100 for Lefevere from this first edition.

III-2-g A.L.S. 2pp. 8vo.
7


1842 Dec 16

Dupre, Jacques
^Opelousas, (Louisiana)

To Father Albin Desgaultier(e)
Opelousas, (Louisiana)

At a meeting today, Dupre gave the trustees an account of the expenditures and revenue of the fabrique. They were convinced that it would be impossible to cover the expenses with the ordinary receipts. They decided unanimously that in the future the sale of the pews and graves would belong exclusively to the fabrique except an annual allocation of 150 piastres to pay the wages of a servant or a grave digger. In the same resolution they renounced the portion allowed the fabrique out of Desgaultier's fees by a motion on March 9, 1814. The trustees thought that by allowing him the entire fees it would give him an advantage.

A.L.S. (French) 3pp. 4to.

Enclosure:

--------
1842 Dec 16

(Labiche, P.)
Opelousas, Louisiana

A copy of the resolution unanimously adopted on December 16. A treasurer will be named to replace Father Victor Jamey, former pastor, plus a secretary to keep the records. The council appointed Gustave Cahanin treasurer and Labiche secretary. The trustees renounced the portion of fees assigned to them on March 9, 1814; the pastor will enjoy the fees without any deduction. The money from the pews and graves will belong to the trustees and be used for the improvement of the church. The treasurer will pay the pastor 150 piastres a year to hire a servant.

Copy (French) 2pp. Folio

V-4-m A.L.S., Copy (French) 5pp. 4to. & folio
5


1842 Dec 16

Leveque, J.A.
West Baton Rouge, (Louisiana)

To Bishop A(nthony) Blanc
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

Leveque writes to inform Blanc about the affairs which Father (Joseph) Evrard left in his hands. He has collected only 15 piastres of the little accounts which he left with him. He sold Evrard's horse for 35 piastres which Leveque will bring to Blanc in January. Mr. Dousau promised to pay, in a short time, the note for 100 piastres which he endorsed for Mrs. Patin(?) whose business he manages. At Evrard's request Leveque sends Blanc his books; Evrard thought Blanc could get them to him. Blanc is to send on the endorsed letter (no enclosure), putting on the rest of the address. (On the address side of the letter) "Care of Eli Landry."

V-4-m A.L.S. (French) 2pp. 4to.
5


1842 Dec 17

Giustiniani, C.M., Father J(oseph)
Natchitoches, (Louisiana)

to Father (Stephen Rousselon
New Orleans, Louisiana)

Giustiniani asks permission to marry Joseph Mission Rachal and Sébérine Lacour, cousins. Also he asks (Rousselon) to continue to send them the Annals of the Propagation of the Faith, they could have in their parish at least ten groups who would pay regularly. He asks to have the ordos for next year and several dozen English catechisms and some prayer books . He will pay with an order on Plauché and Company. Mr. Leconte whom he has asked to go to the bishop's will bring it all. He will also show (Rousselon) the subscriptions from Natchitoches for the Propagateur Catholique. He consoles himself in advance of the happy results for religion which he is sure God will give against the sacrilegious audacity of the trustees. All is peaceful there; church is attended much better. At present they are working on a gallery over the door for the organ. Last spring when the Bishop was there, Giustiniani talked to him about the child of a widow who became a Catholic, a woman who, if not distinguished by her pecuniary means, surely is so by her good qualities. He asked the Bishop to have the child placed with the Ursulines. The mother proposes, if the Bishop demands it, to pay $100 a year. The lady is Mrs. Tallon and the child is 8 years old. Giustiniani's confreres are well and join in greetings.
V-4-m A.L.S. (French) 2pp. 4to.
7


1842 Dec 17

(Odin), Bishop John Mary
Galveston, (Texas)

To Father E(tienne) Rousselon
New Orleans, L(ouisian)a

(Odin) has learned of the death of his young brother at Lyons. They have asked (Odin) for a power of attorney in order to settle the inheritance. (Odin) sends Rousselon the package containing it; Rousselon is to stamp and send it by way of New York. He will reimburse him next spring. He sends his respects to Bishop Blanc. There is nothing new in Texas to interest Rousselon.

V-4-m A.L.S. (French) 2pp. 4to.
1


1842 Dec 18

R(ipley), G(eorge), Brook Farm
(West Roxbury, Massachusetts)

to (Orestes a.) Brownson
Boston, Mass(achusetts)

Orestes (A. Brownson, Jr.) is as good a lad as Brook Farm can boast of. He never heard any complaint of him. Leach speaks of Orestes' prowess with the axe. There is no fear but that he will be an efficient man. If Ripley had never known Brownson, he would never have been engaged in this enterprise. He considers it as the incarnation of those transcendental truths which they have held in common. He feels gratified in seeing those lofty visions embodied in the most truly democratic state. He is disappointed that Brownson should give them such little recognition. But never has he felt estranged from Brownson. Their young people unconsciously worship R(alph) W(aldo)
E(merson) with a too blind adoration. They are so guarded by a host of influences that he apprehends no evil results. Their term for board and tuition are $4 per week.

I-3-f A.L.S. 3pp. 8vo.
4


1842 Dec 19

(Hecker), Isaac
New York, (New York)

To (Orestes A.) Brownson
(Boston, Massachusetts)

He did not write sooner because of his health. Dr. Channing has promised to take him to see Dr. Buchannan but Dr. Channing too has not been well enough to make the necessary arrangements. It was also his earnest wish to go to Boston last week. May come to Boston this week.

I-3-f A.L.S. 2pp. 8vo.
1


1842 Dec 19

(Kenrick), Francis Patrick, B(isho)p of
Phil(adelphia, Pennsylvania)

To Bishop Peter P(aul) Lefevere
Detroit, Michigan

Kenrick is grieved to learn of the pain given Lefevere from an unexpected quarter. Even if the debt were just, Lefevere cannot be held responsible for debts incurred before his appointment if he has not by his own act assumed responsibility. He has heard that the only fault of the person was attachment to money. No scandal should be taken if he has been a married man since the church permits a man once married to orders. Kenrick has not seen him but if he does he will try to get him to abandon his claim. The silence of Rome may arise from
embarrassment. The Bishop (Frederick Résé) ought to be decently maintained even in his retreat. Kenrick cannot see how property in Bishop Frederick (Résé's) name can be defended except with the imperfect power of attorney given to B(isho)p (Claude Mary) Odin. Perhaps an act of the Legislature could give Lefevere all the temporal rights of the absent bishop. The Cincinnati Telegraph's announcement of Dr. (Michael) O'C(onnor)'s appointment to the See of Charleston has no foundation save that he has been proposed by B(isho)p (Joseph Rosati) of St. Louis. The Archbishop (Samuel Eccleston), in deference to Kenrick's wishes to retain O'Connor for the See of Pittsburgh, sent three names: Rev. John McElroy (S.J.), Very Rev. M(ichael) O'Connor, and Rev. James Madison Lancaster. The Telegraph's announcement has been copied into the Religious Cabinet. As the matter has become public, Kenrick believes it necessary to withdraw opposition to the nomination. Lefevere can express to the S(acred) Cong(regatio)n his views on this; and thus have an occasion to arduous duties.
P.S. He wishes Lefevere all the consolations of the approaching festivities.

III-2-g A.L.S. 3pp. 8vo.
11


1842 Dec 20

(Purcell), J(ohn) B(aptist), B(isho)p of Cin(cinnati) Cin(cinnati, Ohio)

To Bishop P(eter) P(aul) Lefevere
Detroit, (Michigan)

The affairs of the Diocese of Detroit were in such a predicament when Lefevere undertook its administration that Purcell anticipated the trials Lefevere would have to endure. Compliance with such an order was as meritorious as martyrdom. The two Fathers (Vincent F. and Stephen T.) Badin stayed so short a time in Cincinnati that Purcell could not find time to speak to them about the subject of Lefevere's letter of December 1. But Purcell's brother (Father Edward Purcell) did, and Vincent (Badin) wrote to his lawyer to refrain from bringing suit against Lefevere. Purcell fears that (Vincent Badin) kept the money that Father John B. DeBruyn had for ^Father (Emanuel) Thienpont. American bishops are very much isolated and have need of faithful and enlightened counselors, as well as smaller and more compact dioceses, and their temporalities placed on a more solid footing. If Lefevere has more embarrassments of one kind, some of his neighbors have more of another. Purcell finds consolation in meetings, such as the one to which all (bishops) are summoned by Archbishop (Samuel Eccleston) in Baltimore in May, though these are expensive and inconvenient. He would submit to remaining longer in (Baltimore) this time, if they could remedy existing evils and enforce the canons of former councils more effectually. Purcell hopes to see Lefevere soon, at least when Lefevere is on his way to the council, and probably travel together with some of the West(ern) and South(ern) bishops to Baltimore.

III-2-g A.L.S. 2pp. 8vo.
7


1842 Dec 21

(Chanche), Bishop John Joseph
Natchez, (Mississippi)

To Bishop (Anthony) Blanc
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

Day before yesterday (Chanche) received a letter from Father (Ghislain) Boheme announcing the reception of (Chanche's) last letter to Blanc and informing (Chanche) of his intention to go immediately to Paulding. (Chanche) hopes Boheme's English will be good enough to give him success. (Chanche) has received the result of the negotiation of the 10,000 francs in New York. It brought $1813.64. He sold the bill in Natchez at 5 per cent discount which left him $1717 and some cents. They will talk of it when he reaches New Orleans which he thinks will be Thursday after Christmas. A priest by the name of Waters from New York applied to (Chanche) a few days ago; his papers seemed to be good so (Chanche) sent him to Jackson, (Mississippi). They are preparing to build a church in that place. (Chanche) needs someone he could keep in Natchez.

V-4-m A.L.S. 3pp. 4to.
5


1842 Dec 22

Francais, Father (N.)
Avoyelles, (Louisiana)

To Bishop A(nthony) Blanc
New Orleans, L(ouisian)a

Five years ago, a young woman from Francais' parish married, in a civil service, a young Frenchman who left her after one year. At that time there was no priest in the parish and the marriage was not ratified. A little girl was born from this marriage. The man wrote from New Orleans that he consented to a divorce. It is supposed that he was married in France before coming to this country but there is no certainty. Now the young woman wants to marry again. She is a good Christian and Francais has never refused her the sacraments. Francais asks Blanc to tell him what to do in this case. In the dispensation Father Rousselon sent he said he would write Francais but he has not yet received a letter.

V-4-m A.L.S. (French) 3pp. 4to.
1


1842 Dec 24

Laurent, Father, Vicar General
Strasbourg, (France)

To Father (Stephen Rousselon)
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

Laurent recommends Mr. Peter, one of their most zealous professors. (Rousselon) will greatly oblige Laurent in finding Peter a place in one of his institutions or in recommending him to a good house as a tutor.

V-4-m A.L.S. (French) 2pp. 4to.
2


1842 Dec 26

(Odin), Bishop John Mary
Galveston, (Texas)

to Father Stephen Rousselon
New Orleans, L(ouisian)a

Having learned that Bishop (Anthony) Blanc is absent from New Orleans (Odin) addresses Rousselon to ask for information on Father (John D.) Urquhart, Irish priest, who has just written that he was about to leave for Texas. (Odin) would not like to employ him without being informed about his past conduct. Religion has already suffered much here from scandals; it would be unfortunate to renew these painful scenes. If Urquhart is still in New Orleans, Rousselon is to give him the letter addressed to him. A few weeks ago (Odin) concluded the purchase of a fine property here in Galveston for which he gave an order favor $500 on Blanc payable April 15. At the time of payment (Odin) will be in New Orleans and after a letter of advice from Father (Jean-Baptiste) Etienne, (C.M.) He will be able to honor the order if Rousselon does not have the means to repay the small sum (Odin) left in Blanc's hands. Rousselon is to put (Odin's) and Father (Charles M.) Menard's names on the subscription list for the French paper published under the auspices of the priests of New Orleans. A good number of people approached the Holy Table on Christmas; it seems the poor Catholics of Galveston have some desire to do better.
V-4-m A.L.S. (French) 2pp. 4to.
6


1842 Dec 29

Cargill, Valentine
N(ew) Y(ork), New York

to O(restes) A. Brownson
Boston, Mass(achusetts)

He has been directed to transmit to Brownson a copy of a unanimously agreed upon resolution of the Board of Directors of this Corporation (Mechanic's Institute). The thanks of this Board are tendered to Rev. Orestes A. Brownson, Boston, for his highly interesting lecture.

I-3-f A.L.S. 1p. 8vo.
1


1842 Dec 29

Gallinger, Father Joseph
Zanesville, Ohio

to Bishop John Baptist Purcell
of Cincinnati, Ohio

In the short time he was in Columbus many Germans received the sacraments. On December 26 he went to Zanesville where he was received by the German community. Although very poor they have determined to build a church which will be ready in a few weeks. He asks Purcell's permission to bless it. The English congregation would not let them hold services in their church so he holds services in a bedroom. The Germans lack all the vestments. He also has but two portable stones of which he must leave one there. He asks for another stone and for an old chasuble.

II-4-h A.L.S. 1p. 12mo. (Latin)
4


1842 Dec 29

Kundig, (Father) M(artin)
Milwaukee, (Wisconsin)

To Bishop Peter Paul Lefevere of Zela
Detroit, Michigan

Kundig wrote to (Father Edmund) Kilroy some time ago, but Kundig conjectures Kilroy did not receive the letter. Kundig and associates received the ordo for 1843 and thanks Lefevere. Since his return from Detroit Kundig did not write Lefevere. There was nothing of importance and Lefevere's time is precious. He wishes to tell Lefevere of an idea that weights on his mind. Kundig is credibly informed that Mr. Williams, treasurer of Trinity Church, will not be able to pay him the money due him after the collection is made because of the demands made on it by Kundig's creditors. Some of his creditors are willing to take 35 c(ents) on the dollar but he cannot pay them that, and the others dollar for dollar. Kundig sees but one solution. He will give Lefevere a receipt to Mr. Williams for all due him from the congregation, if Lefevere will accept it. Kundig wants the money as soon as possible since the interest on debts he could cancel at 25 c(ents) on the dollar is accumulating rapidly. He cannot save anything for six or eight months to come. He is opening the way for someone after him to earn. Such it was in Detroit and Ohio. He desired to leave Detroit because he could not meet his creditors. Some have appointed lawyers in Milwaukee to call upon him, but he has more rest from them. With $700 he could clear himself of all debt. Not having it and being unable to get it he prays that God may do what he pleases with him. He and Father (Thomas) Morrisey are so busy as sometimes not to know what to do first. He should now go 150 miles to Mineral Point, (Wisconsin) where the first inhabitants are Catholics, General Becket, Colonel O'Neil, Captain Dotch and their families, Doctor McSherry etc. and to two other places too Catholics who never yet saw a priest in Wisconsin. He would explain their doings but, having written them up for Mr. Smith editor of the Detroit Catholic paper, Lefevere can read them there. He writes these letters at home; he has no time on the mission. He is sorry to have to stay at home now answering six weeks back correspondence, and neglecting urgent calls. He is convinced Wisconsin will take a noble place among the dioceses as soon as a bishop is appointed for it. If Lefevere toured the zealous and contented Wisconsin congregations he would return well pleased. Most Catholics here came last year or this, are poor but healthy and have good land and water. They are hopeful and thank God for having brought them to Wisconsin. He sends Lefevere the handbill for the school arrangements. The plastering not being finished the opening of the institution for boarders had to be postponed, though many have called for the purpose.
P.S. He wishes Lefevere a happy new year that as it is the first for Lefevere as Bishop, it may be the best of his life. Father Morrisey would wish the same, but is on the mission.

III-2-g A.L.S. 3pp. 8vo.
4


1842 Dec 29

Priour, Father J(ulian)
New Iberia, (Louisiana)

to Father (Stephen) Rousselon
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

Having discovered an impediment of relationship between Jean and Suzanne, Priour asks for a dispensation for them as they wish to marry the third or fifth of January, 1843.
(P.S.) He sends his respects to the Bishop. On Christmas day he had more than 80 Communions in his little church.

V-4-m A.L.S. (French) 2pp. 8vo.
2


1842 Dec 30

Humbert, J.
New York, (New York)

To Bishop (Anthony Blanc)
New Orleans, L(ouisian)a

Though not a member of (Blanc's) church, Humbert is an afflicted and heartbroken parent. There is now in New Orleans a ruffian priest by the name of (John D.) Urqu(h)art who seduced Humbert's daughter, Mrs. Brown, from her husband and two children. He took her to Rio de Janeiro where a subscription was raised by which she was sent back and is now with Humbert, Urquart also having been sent to England. In order to prevent a dreadful tragedy Humbert warns (Blanc) that his daughter's husband has sworn to follow him and have his life. Should (Blanc) doubt this statement he can write to the Bishop of New York who knows all the particulars.

V-4-m A.L.S. 3pp. 4to.
3


1842 Dec 30

Rousselon, Father E(tienne)
New Orleans, (Louisiana)

Bishop Anthony Blanc informs Father (Constantine)
Maenhaut, pastor of St. Louis, that a dispensation from second degree relationship is granted to Charles Savory and Mary Suzanne Tricou.

V-4-m D.S. (Latin) 1p. Folio
4


1842 Dec 30

(Signay), Bishop Jos(eph)
Quebec, (Canada)

To Bishop Ant(hony) Blanc

(Signay) writes for information on two persons formerly of his diocese and who lived and died in Blanc's diocese. Jean Baptiste Papin, a printer, left Quebec about 10 years ago; his family recently learned that he died last year. Hospice Bedard was a lawyer in Montreal; his parents heard that he died about 2 years ago. (Signay) would be very grateful for any information about these two persons.
V-4-m A.L.S. (French) 3pp. 4to.
3